"This & That" News - August 2004

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Below is August 7, 2004 to August 28, 2004.

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Saturday August 28, 2004 T&T Weekly - Circulation over 4,000 Vol 8 Issue 384

Last week I mentioned how I had tried for over 20 years to get 2 of those long white concrete grave covers made for my family's plot at Rosehill. It seems the present day area monument companies do not want to mess with making them, especially trying to duplicate those made by Artie Arnold on C Street SE. I have been told there are a couple of companies that make the full length grave covers, but not like Artie Arnold made, predominate around this area. This picture shows the older Arnold covers in the back and a newer 1997 grave cover in the front. <----- Click Here

This week I talked to Tom Arnold, whose grandfather, Lee Arnold, of Arnold Monuments on C Street SE here in Ardmore. Tom said Mr. Arnold started out in the business in the 1940s making grave vaults and the eventually the grave covers I talked about in last weeks T&T. After Mr. Arnold's death, his son Artie Arnold continued making the grave covers at the monument company. But the grave covers pretty much came to an end after Artie died in 1972. Erie Taylor, an Indian employee, did make the covers a couple of years after Artie passed away, but then because of age and bad health, Erie stopped making the grave covers too.

As a wee lad Tom Arnold helped his dad make the grave covers and he gave me a lot of insight into how they were constructed. I've made some mechanical drawings of the covers, and a friend is going to make the forms, and pour the concrete and all. The actual white finish is a mixture of white concrete and chicken grit. You don't know what chicken grit is you say? That's small pieces of broken up oyster shell. The chickens need the grit in their craw to help grind up the food they eat. I'll let everyone know how it goes with the grave cover making a future issue of T&T. <----- Click Here <----- Click Here

A Reader emailed me a picture this week taken around 1968 from The Daily Ardmoreite. Its a photo of Southern Oklahoma Ambulance Service manager Bill Lewis and employee Troy Loard. The Chevrolet station wagon converted to an ambulance is a 1967 model. I am guessing the picture was taken about 1968. I went to work at the ambulance service part time around October 1969, and then full time in July 1970. Troy and I transported many patients in that station wagon before the ambulance service traded it off for a new 1975 Dodge raised-top conversion van. I remember one day Troy and I were making an emergency run in that station wagon from the south part of town, down North Washington toward the hospitals. We got to around 10th and North Washington, and Troy start getting slower and slower. I was with the patient and wondering, what's wrong? Troy said "I dont know, it just wont go". Troy radioed for a backup ambulance, and we soon found out the transmission just went out on North Washington. Boy, were those the days. <----- Click Here

Speaking of old pictures, I received one this week, a 1975 or thereabouts pic of the Carter County Sheriffs Department. This is when the sheriffs office and jail was located where the election board is today, 107 Hinkle Street in Ardmore. Those in the picture are: 1 Shorty Claxton, 2 J.R. Ragsdale, 3 Bud Hunt, 4 Sam Smith, 5 Bob Kelty, 6 George Strawn, 7 Loyd Hudson, 8 Don Turley, 9 Melvin Grover, 10 Ralph Richards, 11 John Smithers, 12 Dean Plank, 13 John Sigler, 14 T.C. Varner, 15 Sheriff Robert Denney. <----- Click Here

I was over in Atoka the other day and stopped on Court Street. Court Street in Atoka is like Main Street in most towns. Its a beautiful old historic area, even older than Ardmore, and as I walked down Court Street I look at several of the antique stores. Antiques Emporium in Atoka had some really neat stuff that caught my eye including a group of old law enforcement badges. <----- Click Here

This is an old hand held blow torch. I remember them when I was a teen, but cant remember what fuel filled the tank. <----- Click Here

This pic is kinda dark but its an old wooden lathe, ran by some kind of belt to turn the lathe. <----- Click Here

This item is unusual for this area of the U.S. Its a steel wood stove with a porcelain finish. <----- Click Here

This is a pic of the old bank in Atoka. <----- Click Here

Here is a pic of Atoka's old Masonic Temple on Court Street. <----- Click Here

Here is the business card for Antiques Emporium in Atoka, Oklahoma. 580-889-5675 <----- Click Here

A T&T Reader brought me by one of those little stick-on magnets like you attach to your refrigerator. Now this ain't no ordinary run of the mill stick-on magnet mind you. On its face is a picture of the newly reconditioned bells of the First Presbyterian Church here in Ardmore. <----- Click Here

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Hello, I have an ancestor, my great-grandfather, who worked as section master in Ravia in the early century. I do not have the exact dates, and I'm hoping someone can help. His name was Clem Kuykendall. Thanks!" jenniferjeancharter@hotmail.com
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Butch, I have an old letter (Chickasaw Indian Hattie Williams 1904) from I.T. days that you might like to put in your newsletter. Thanks. -Jack Blundell, 308 Twisted Oad Dr., Cantonment, FL 32533. 850-479-7700. photosavers@cox.net <----- Click Here
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"Butch, The white grave markers were made by Arnold and Craddock Monument Co. There was no mold just some 2 x 6 boards. We used lathe and rebar to keep the concrete from cracking. The markers were made using white cement. That was how I worked my way through two years of M I T. That's 'Murray In Tishomingo'. Artie Arnold was the shop foreman that was responsible for carving the monuments, adding dates to stones already set in the cemetery and the white markers. They were built on the south side of the old sheet metal building and the best I can remember now they were built on the ground that was formed with an underlay. Boards were pinned in on the sides and then a step in another set. The next time I am in Ardmore I will go by the cemetery and see if that helps my memory. The vaults were built inside the building using forms built of wood and covered with a smooth sheet metal. These bolted together and before bolting we would use an oil to wet the sheet metal so the concrete would come loose without sticking. After the markers were poured and had partially dried they were rubbed down with a piece of grind stone. Usually they were set on top of a concrete vault that was underground. I had my FUN doing this from 1951 to 1953."
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"Someone wrote in and asked for a picture of the old Troy school in Johnston Co, OK. I, too, am interested in getting a picture. My mother and siblings attended school there many moons ago. When I was growing up here in Ardmore, we would go to Troy every year to check on the family graves in the Troy Cemetery, which was located right next to that school. The school was already closed at that time but was still standing. I would have sworn that we had taken some snapshots of the school with us kids standing in front of it but I can't find them anywhere. This was a big deal for us...a trip to Johnston County (that's what we called it). We would get so excited that we were going to the cemetery and then on to the Ten Acre Rock, which is just down the road from there. We would climb it and run all over the top of it. It is very grown up around the TA Rock now, and very snakey, so we don't get out there anymore. I did go up on top of it a few years back and videoed from up there. Back to the cemetery. My mother always told us a "ghost story" about something that the children and some of the teachers saw in the school yard. During the time my mother attended there, back in the 1920's, the school had a janitor who lived in a home located right behind the school. He would go home for lunch each day and then return in time to ring the school bell, signaling that noon recess was over. One day he didn't show up and someone went to check on him. They found him dead...apparently had a heart attack. He had at least one child but his wife had died several years ago and was buried in the Troy Cem. At that time the cemetery either wasn't fenced in or it had a fence that was broken in places,and some of the area farmers' cattle would wander thru and trample on the graves. This custodian was concerned about that and had urged the citizens of the community to fix the fence. Shortly after his death, a young girl was in the outhouse at the schoolyard and came out screaming. She said she saw a grayish-white figure in it. No one really believed her until several days later, it happened again, but to another person. The children and their teachers were in the school yard for noon recess and when this girl screamed, and came running out, everyone looked in that direction. According to my mother, who was present, a grayish, smoky-looking form floated out of the outhouse and into the cemetery, where it disappeared. Shortly after that happened, a fence was constructed (or if there was one already there, it was repaired) - I can't remember which. After that, no one saw that ghostly figure again. I have often wondered why the apparition appeared to the girls, instead of the boys, but have decided it was probably because it knew that the girls would scream and tell everyone what they saw. The boys might not have admitted seeing it. Who knows, but it makes a good spooky story, esp., when we've gone to the cemetery on a dark, misty night. As you can tell from this, we led very simple lives and didn't get out of Carter Co. very much, so a trip to the cemetery (where we had a picnic - seriously), was a highlight for us. Our lives were so much more simple then and we appreciated things more readily. At least, I did. Thanks Butch for all you do to stir our memories."
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"As promised here is a chart showing the businesses that occupied Main streer throughout 1940 and 1950's as we remembered it. The chart was made by my niece Laura Lamb and her mother Rita Lamb. Rita was the daughter of Lawrence Sprekelmeyer and Laura was his Granddaughter. We can't verify accuracy as 100 per cent. I note that the A and P store and the Peoples Federal Loan agency do not appear on the corner of Main and C street because the buildings were torn down. but all in all its a pretty good illustration of the businesses of Ardmore. You must remember this all resulted from my request to Laura to photograph Main street from the Sante fe Station to the First Methodist church then cross the street and photograph the other side of Main street back down to the railroad. Laura did this for me on a Sunday morning when there weren't any cars dr. Sorry, I can't send you a copy of those pictures." -Bill O'Heran <----- Click Here
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"Good Day Mr. Bridges, The story about the grave covers, Vol 8, Issue 383 has a history beyond and before Oklahoma or Carter County. They were used in Richmond, Virginia in the early days of the founding of this country. According to local folklore the covers were to keep the medical students at the local college from digging up the bodies and using the cadavers to assist in the study of anatomy. This was the only way many medical students could obtain bodies to help them advance their education. You can see many of these grave covers at St. Johns Church in Richmond, Virginia. Most churches doubled as church and graveyard in those days and graves encircle St. Johns. Tours are given daily as this is the same church where Patrick Henry, the first Governor of Virginia, said those famous words, "Give me liberty or give me death". This was before the beginning of the Revolution War on March 23, 1775. Even an old Okie like me can remember reading about that in my history class in Oklahoma." -W. E. (Wally) Glasscock. Richmond, VA. E-Mail: wallyg@erols.com
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"I believe from the accounts that were told to me growing up that old Doc Brown from Davis is the one who cut a part of Trigger's tail off during the filming of Home in Oklahoma. Still say some of the best shots ever of Turner Falls can be seen in the movie - before it became so commercialized. The memories of those days are and will be forever etched in my mind. Nice people Roy and Dale who took the time out some 40 years later to answer a letter from Jennifer which included a photo of Dale, Roy, and their favorite cat in their den."
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WIRT FRANKLIN RESIDENCE, also known as Gault Residence. Edward Gault's home was built in 1914. Mr. Gault was inspired to build this nineteen room home after his successful venture in the discovery of the Healdton Oil Field with partners, Wirt Franklin and Roy Johnson. This home has an exterior of white stucco with a hip type roof. The front terrace of the house has red terra cotta tile floor and a fountain featuring playful children which greet all guests upon their arrival. In addition, there are two goldfish ponds adjacent to the home to make outdoor time more pleasurable. Inside this home all of the floors are of hardwood which was very typical for the fine homes of the period. The entry is appointed with a spiral stair case that leads to the second floor. Four wood burning fireplaces are located on the first floor, each having its on design to suit the setting of each individual room. "Rook-wood" is the tile work used in the home, also being a very popular and desirable feature of any home of this period. A crystal chandelier appends from the ceiling and hand-painted foil paper adorn the walls in the formal dining room. Hand painted murals adorn the walls in the doll room and the east sun room. Many of the light fixtures throughout the home are hand made with embossed relief glass shades, background glass in white with blue garland trim. The stately home was equipped with central heat. The heat source being generated from the basement with steam radiators. There are six bedrooms on the second floor of this beautiful home, two of which adjoin sun room on either end of the house. This early day, but very modern home to Ardmore, also has four baths, three of which are located on the second floor. The Gault home shared the knoll with Roy Johnson's property to the east. The neighbors and business partners often visited one another. There is still evidence of a red terra cotta tile path; upon close scrutiny, one can see that this path joins the two oilmen's properties. The Gault's lived in the home for approximately seven years and then sold the residence to the third partner of the Healdton Oil Field, Wirt Franklin. Mr. Franklin lived in the home from the early 20's until his death in 1962. The estate was purchased by Otey Johnson, son of Roy Johnson, and was transferred to the Ardmore Institute of Health in 1984 upon the request of Otey Johnson.
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I am looking for any and all ghost stories ( real or regional) relating to Oklahoma. I am particularly looking for ones from Henryetta, Ardmore, Dustin, and Ryal and anything along Insterstates I-40 and/or I-69...especially if anyone can relate to the sighting of an "old man" on either of these interstates.

Please feel free to contact me at Caitorrie@hotmail.com, or send to Butch and he will forward it to me. Identities will kept confidential as to who relates them, as I am only interested in the stories themselves
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The Daily Ardmoreite February 2, 1912 THE NEW ROYAL IS HOME PRODUCT Moving Picture Show Opens Saturday Afternoon, Has Many New Features. The new Royal theatre will be opening tomorrow afternoon with a matinee. Workmen have been busy for several weeks constructing the prettiest moving picture show in the entire state. Last summer the Lowenstien Brothers had this venture in mind, and on their visit to Chicago they visited the show houses there and mapped out the plans that would be followed in building their show house here. The booth is lined with asbestos. If the films should catch fire the flames would be confined within the booth and the building would be absolutely safe. Deagan's electric orchestra bells line the walls and will chime in beautifully with the music. A six-piece orchestra will be present at the opening Sat. afternoon and the orchestra will be at every show. The Lowensteins will not be able to take any outside engagements to furnish music. What are known as pot lights are suspended from the ceiling and the show house is never darkened, and the Royal will overcome one objection in the picture shows. Ben Scott, an Ardmore boy, will be at the helm of the Motiograph. C.W. Bigert did the inside decoration work and it is a piece of art in plastic that will be appreciated by anyone who has an eye for the beautiful. Daniels & Babinton installed the Deagan chimes. Mr. Hicks did the outside decoration work and the beauty attracts every passer-by. There are 42 lights in the lobby. The Lowenstein Brothers have spent nearly $34,000 in new equipments and the new play house will open for business tomorrow afternoon.
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February 4, 1912 Homer Hinkle, one of Ardmore's best known and popular young business man has resigned his position with the real estate firm of Mullen & Mullen and has purchased an interest in the Mark Kirkpatrick & Co. insurance firm. The Kirkpatrick company has recently purchased the interests of the W.T. Freeman company.
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Mr. G.H. Bruce, secretary of the board of education, says that he receives from one to three or four letters daily from contractors and builders from all over the country, both in Oklahoma and other states, making inquiries about the letting of contracts for erecting the high school building.
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February 25, 1912 HOBBLE SUITS FOR MEN NOW New York--Hobble suits for men are the very latest thing, according to the dictum of the National Association of Merchant Tailors, which recently held its convention in this city. The following conclusions as to styles of masculine garments were given out. The spring fashions shall represent long lines and striped materials. The lines will follow the natural figure with no padding, no hip pegs, no double collars, and narrow, long revers for stout men. That the new Tuxedos shall be gray, instead of black, to enable one to distinguish one's friends from the waiter. That American men hate the high silk hat and only wear it under cover of a carriage after nightfall. That too many American men are bow-legged to wear the dress suit to advantage. Finally padding is out of date for men, as well as women, and that the new lines for men will follow the hobbie gown for women comfortable, of course, but perfectly natural.
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August 6, 1916 STYLE SHOW OPENING WILL BE SUCCESS Nothing but the most unfavorable weather conditions can put a damper on the opening of the first annual spring style show tonight, and already scores of visitors are in evidence, and at half past seven tonight Ardmore will be seen as she has never been seen before. From the Santa Fe tracks to C street on Main, and from Main to The Ardmoreite office on Washington street, there will be attractions galore in every block. The merchants have "kept the faith" and have not done things by halves. Every store will be worth visiting and there will be surprises all along the line. Thousands of flowers have been ordered and will be given away by the different concerns. The men are not to be forgotten, either, as there will be something for them also. The band arrived on schedule time, and immediately let the town know it, as they marched to marital strains from the train to Shuman's Cafe, where dinner was awaiting them. Everything is ready at the automobile exposition. The cars are being assembled as The Ardmoreite goes to press, and still more are en route. These will be unloaded and place in position immediately on arrival, and before tomorrow night, it is expected that every available space in the big tent will have been taken up. J.W. Krueger, president of the Business Men's association, said today: "All is in readiness. It's great the way all have responded. Nothing but bad weather can mar the occasion and we are in for a splendid week."
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Alymer Moore, one of the pioneer citizens of Ardmore passed away this morning. Mr. Moore has been prominently identified with the growth of the city ever since becoming a citizen. He was progressive, and for many years, was superintendent of city streets.
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L.W. Cruce has purchased the A.C. Cruce home at the corner of C and Stanley. This home has an east front and is located on what is considered the prettiest street in the residence section of Ardmore. Mr. Cruce probably paid a sum approaching close to $10,000 for this beautiful home.
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January 6, 1931 WIFE CHARGED WITH SHOOTING Tishomingo--With a bullet wound in each arm just above the wrist, Robert Ayers is in a Durant hospital, and his estranged wife, Mrs. Alice A. Ayers, is in jail here, charged with the shooting. The affair occurred on Main street here late Sunday afternoon when the two met in front of the Tishomingo Drug company. Ayers condition is not thought to be serious. Ayers, a Johnston county farmer, was convicted in the May term of district court here last year of the murder of Ira Sanson, a farm youth on October 22, 1929. He was released on $40,000 bond pending an appeal for a new trial. Arthur Keltner, charged jointly with Ayers for the murder of Sanson, was given 50 years in the state penitentiary also by the same jury which found Ayers guilty. He was released recently on bond pending an appeal. Keltner and Ayers are alleged to have slain Sanson on a Washita river bridge southwest of here when a quarrel is said to have arisen over liquor transactions.
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March 19, 1931 GOVERNOR SAYS YOUTH ENTITLED TO HAVE REVIEW Governor Murray today granted a stay of execution to a "boy who killed the son of one of my best friends." The stay was granted to Colquitt Davis, 20, sentenced to die April 2 for the death of Con Keirsey, Carter county deputy sheriff, in a gun battle at Wirt last Dec. 10. It was the first such respite granted by Murray. No time limit is fixed. The governor said the youth is entitled to a review.
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THEY SAY Herbert Pate, Madill--I am moving the paper from Kingston and starting a semi-weekly instead of a weekly. Cal Stewart--I am a native of old Indian Territory. My mother was a member of the Judge Love family.
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March 23, 1931 MAN IS SHOTDOWN AND ROBBED OF $300 M.N. Rogers, 55, recluse of County Line, is in the Hardy sanitarium with a dangerous gunshot wound in his abdomen as the result of an attack on him Sunday afternoon by three unidentified hijackers. After shooting Rogers, the three men took three $100 bills and a revolver he had in his possession and departed. Sheriff Elmer Byrd and Deputy Sheriff Cecil Crosby are on the trail of the three men, and have important clues, it was stated, as to their identity. Rogers has informed officers that he can identify the three men who came to his home, where he lived alone, and at the point of guns forced him to give over his savings. He made an effort to defend himself and one of the bandits fired pointblank. The bullet plowed its way into his abdomen.
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March 31, 1931 OFFICERS TEAR MAN FROM YOUNG BRIDE Robert K. Smith 29, alleged under conviction in Georgia for forgery of checks was arrested last night by Bill Guess, Bill Ward, and Elmer Byrd of the sheriffs office at Healdton less than five hours after he had married Cazetta Stanley, 17, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Stanley of Healdton. Smith was arrested after he had paid for an elaborate wedding supper for nearly 25 guests with a worthless check. He is also alleged to have paid for a wedding ring the same way. He and Miss Stanley were married by Rev. Pattye Horn Gilmer after the marriage license had been bought in Ardmore. Mrs. Stanley signed permission for her daughter's marriage to Smith. The officers found papers in Smith's possession indicating that he and a former wife may not have been divorced. A copy of a divorce petition relating that Smith and his former wife had married on Nov. 13, 1930 and lived together only two days was found. Whether this petition was ever acted upon is not known. It related, however that Smith had been indicted and convicted of forgery and given two years in the penitentiary early this year. Smith posed as a private detective at Healdton. He wore a badge labeled "marshal", it is stated. Smith is being held in the county jail.
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May 2, 1954 Rambling Reporter ** Gene Gardner and his wife Ruth, were both reared in Ardmore, but when they started raising a family they moved to the country near Deese. They have seven youngsters ranging in age from nine to four months, namely, Betty Jean, Billy, Mary, Barbara, Judy, James, and Ruth Elaine. Judy, a year old, is at the present in the Crippled Childrens hospital in OKC. Gene works as a roughneck in the oil fields. ** Springdale school was well represented in Ardmore the other day by Kay Arthur, Bobbie Holden, Joyce Woolery, Mary Holder, Sue Arthur, and Reta Woolery. ** M/Sgt. Ed McQuade, attached to the Ardmore Air Force Base, has 14 years service in the air force and is making it a career. He and his wife, Emma, had their youngsters, Erin 15, and Jimmie 3, out to the zoo getting acquainted with our animals. The family resides at 700 Seventh Avenue Northeast.
** Bill Cason, garage operator, has lived in Ardmore most of the time since he moved here from Texas 23 years ago. His hobbies are hot-rods. Bill and his wife, Bertie, are the parents of Gary, Jeff and Cheryl--with still another ordered. They live at 416 Second avenue southeast.
** Bennie Meadows came to the original Ardmore base 10 years ago and met Betty Bishop--another war romance of a GI from Richmond, VA., and an Ardmore girl. The Meadows own their home at 1109 Hargrove, with Bennie building a good part of it himself.
** Sally Word is Ernest Tate's attractive secretary, who counts her home town as Lone Grove, although she now resides in Ardmore.
** Ed Teague is another one of Jack Williamson's busy pop peddlers. He and his wife, Martha, are the parents of a pair of cuties, Carol Ann and Joyette Lynn and live at 1021 Wolverton street.
** Mary Sue Grover and Jo Hull assured me that they had sense enough to come in out of the rain.
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"Butch... regarding the piece on Bill Guess this week. Guess had a busy1931... if you remember back in January, 1931 he was the deputy who tracked down the killer of Ardmore police policeman Buddie Moorhead (my father) and killed him over in Esteline, Texas just a few days after the shooting in Ardmore... you had this in your newsletter about a year ago... also another mention of Guess a few months later." -Jack Moorhead
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(Judge Asa Walden presided over the court of the death of deputy sheriff Con Kiersey and recommended death sentence for Colquitt Davis in January 1931.)

RESOLUTION.
WHEREAS, Asa E. Walden, was born March 1, 1893, at Melisa, in Collin County, Texas, being a son of W. E. Walden and Mary Alice Walden, nee Roberts; that the parents of said Asa E. Walden came to Pike, Indian Territory, (now Love County) in 1900, where young Walden attended his first school, thereafter he attended school at Thackerville, and Marietta, Oklahoma, he then attended Southeastern State Teachers College, and taught school a year and attended Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, and obtained his law course, and was admitted to the bar in Oklahoma in the summer of 1914; at the election in 1914, Asa E. Walden was elected representative from Love County, was re-elected twice and served the people in the Legislature of this State for six years, and in 1920, resumed the practice of law; that in December 1914, Asa E. Walden married Exa Wiseman of Thackerville, and to this union was born five children; Helen Walden; Alice Joe Walden; Jimmie Walden; Rose Marie Walden and Sue Walden; thereafter and in April of 1923, the Governor of the State of Oklahoma, appointed Asa E. Walden District Judge of the Eighth Judicial District of the State of Oklahoma, he being then 29 years of age and the youngest District Judge in Oklahoma; that Judge Walden was re-elected twice to his position, and was District Judge when he died September 1, 1934; that Judge Walden served the people of this District and the State of Oklahoma fearlessly and honestly and was widely and favorably known. That Judge Walden was a member of the Methodist Church of Marietta, and teacher of the Bible Class of that Church, the class being named for him; he was also a member of the Masonic Order.

THEREFORE be it resolved that in the death of Judge Asa E. Walden the Judiciary of this State has lost one of its most valuable Judges; that the Bar of this State has lost one of its brightest members.

THAT THE FAMILY of Judge Walden has lost all, he being a devoted husband and a loving father;

That the Methodist Church has lost an active worker and valuable member.

Page 495

That the people have lost a real friend, for he was in fact a friend of the common man, believing at all times the rights of the oppressed should be protected.

Be it further resolved that a copy of this resolution be spread of record on the journal of the District Court of Love County, Oklahoma; a copy sent to the Historical Society of the State of Oklahoma, a copy to the Historical Society of the State of Texas, and a copy to the family of Judge Walden.

Respectfully submitted,

B. W. Jones
J. W. Dixon
Crawford W. Cameron
John Steele Batson
C. C. Wilkins
O. E. English
W. J. Williams
J. I. Goins,
THE BAR OF LOVE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA.
(Committee)

<----- Click Here
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The story begins in wartime 1942 near Ardmore, Oklahoma. <----- Click Here

2nd part <----- Click Here
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"Here's a web page listing all sorts of antique and odd-ball tools and objects. Can you guess what they are?" <----- Click Here
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"I seem to have misplaced the murder of a relative again, James Martin was shot & killed either in Carter or Love Co OK (or IT) he was married to Laura Cox, my husbands Grandfathers sister. Apparently there was more than one man convicted and sent to prison. The last man still alive was turned down for parole about 15 or so yrs ago and he died in prison. Unfortunately this is every scrap of info I have on this, I sure could use some help finding the offenders names and the particulars of the incident if anyone knows them." -Linda Hamner (Great Niece-in-Law of Deputy Sheriff Walter Tate) genilin2850@yahoo.com <----- Click Here
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"Oklahoma's Poor Farms, Orphanages, Sanitariums and Institutions." <----- Click Here
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"A goose quill is more dangerous than a lion's claw." - English

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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Saturday August 21, 2004 T&T Weekly - Circulation over 4,000 Vol 8 Issue 383

A Reader posted a question to me a couple of weeks ago after reading in the mailbag about "Slim" Guess of Murray county, asking if Slim was the same person as Bill Guess, a deputy sheriff in Carter county in the 30s. Bill Guess was the Carter county deputy who cause in international incident between Mexico and the U.S. when he shot and killed the nephew of the President of Mexico at about "E" Street NW and 10th Street on June 8, 1931. Some of you will remember we talked a month or two ago about Jim Guess of Davis being the original proprietor of Agri Products here in Ardmore. Since Bill Guess lived in Murray county 75 or 80 years ago, I would bet a dime to a donut the Jim Guess of today who lives in Davis is kinfolk. <----- Click Here

In answer to the question about Bill Guess and Slim Guess being the one and same: "The Daily Ardmoreite January 6, 1931. C.E. BYRD TAKES SHERIFF'S POST; NAMES DEPUTIES. All of Byrd's deputies are well know to Carter county....... W.E. Guess has been a member of the police force of the city of Ardmore for some years. He also served as a deputy sheriff in Murray county years ago."

This week I received an email from someone I do not know, from someplace I know not where. He said he was looking over my website and saw the old photo of my mother Louise Bridges. He ran it through his photo program, emailed it to me, and the end retouched photo overwhelmed me. I sure miss my mom. She passed away in 1990. <----- Click Here

James Lindsey is head of Maintenance at the courthouse and when he arrived home SE of Ardmore the other day, there laying right at his front porch was a timber rattler! Yikes!! The pics below are not for the faint hearted, so take a chill pill if you need to. This 3 footer has 8 rattlers. <----- Click Here <----- Click Here

Of course the above incident does not compare to the time last Fall James Lindsey drove to work that morning and unbeknownst to him, in the back of his pickup was one of his chickens. It jumped out and ran off. At 5pm James left for home without the chicken. The next day at 5pm when he went out to his pickup to go home, there was that chicken in the bed of his pickup. Now folks, thats the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, so help me God, as best as I remember the story. hahaha

Speaking of the courthouse, everyone around the complex is very proud of our District Attorney, Mitch Sperry. He was in Oklahoma City a couple of weeks ago being recognized as Oklahoma's District Attorney of the Year.... The David Moss Memorial Award. <----- Click Here <----- Click Here <----- Click Here <----- Click Here

Across the street from the courthouse in the Colston Building is, or was, Dana's Cafe. It changed hands and re-opened for business as the Colston Cafe on Wednesday August 11th. The owners is the same family that owns Casa Roma on West Main just east of the Tivoli Theater. Of course as soon as I heard they were open I had to go over and order a hamburger! Pretty good eating! <----- Click Here

We've talked about Fulton Pies several times the past few months. I found out this week there is a business at the big mall in Gainesville that sells Fulton Pies. Mine sure tasted good! <----- Click Here

I snapped a pic of the buffalo statue that stands in front of the Ardmore Depot last weekend. <----- Click Here

I thought sure someone somewhere would email me this week after I asked if anyone knew where to have some of the long white grave cover markers made, but nary a person wrote me. They are scattered all over Rosehill cemetery, and I know a place on "C" Street Southeast made them when they were in business back in the 70s. I find it hard to believe no one has a mold to make them today. Maybe these grave covers are only found in Carter county? <----- Click Here

A Reader wrote in this week asking if I had a picture of the old Troy School (Johnston county). I looked through my photos and couldnt find one. If anyone has a pic of the Troy School, let me know.

A T&T Reader reminded me this week that August 26th is Sucker Day in Wetumka, Oklahoma <----- Click Here <----- Click Here

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"not many people knew that Mr. Roy Johnson was a railroad man fan. while there he showed me one of his many pictures on the subject and ask me what's wrong with this picture? not being a fan i had no idea. he pointed out that the smoke coming out was from a tube type stack when the picture showed a bulb or billows type. i.e. big round bulb of a stack and a thin line of smoke like it came out of a tube. he thought that was so funny. wish i could remember more of him. also wish i could remember what i was doing out there. regards to all y'all on the sunny side of the arbuckles." -Gerald Cobb gtcobb@cox.net
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"An informative article on safe surfing (grazing for all you Okies) with links to AV & update sites." <----- Click Here
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"Just as I promised you about one of your southern settlers in Indian Territory in the late 1890s and early 1900s. I got the information from the source index in the back of the book Howard K. Berry, Sr. wrote about Moman Pruiett - He Made It Safe To Murder. Here are some newspaper sources that might of interest to your T&T readers. This should keep you busy as a dog for awhile checking out these southern Indian Territory newspapers of cases that Moman Pruiett defended. I am also attaching a doc file of the notes I jotted down from Berry's book about Moman Pruiett and his defense of Charles Bias in 1899 and took all the way to the US Supreme Court in January 1900."

Chickasaw Enterprise, Pauls Valley, I.T.
April 11, 1895 -- "A Terrible Tragedy: Judge Joe Paul Shot and Killed by Jennison McClure." December 18, 1896 -- "The Stevenson Case" January 18, 1900 -- "Charlie Bias' Death Sentence Commuted to Life" (See attached doc file) May 30, 1901 -- "Sam Ashton Acquitted." November 14, 1901 --- "Serious shooting." December 1, 1904 -- "In District Court." December 5, 1901 -- "Tom Powell Case." January 16, 1902 -- "George Hancock Acquitted in Killing of Marshal Charles Liddell"; "Moman Pruiett Stepping High These Days." January 30, 1902 -- "Pruiett Finds Father's Lost Uncle in St. Louis While on Wade Hampton Case." April 10, 1902 -- "Court Proceedings." May 15, 1902 -- "Eulogy to Mrs. Lilly Belle Pruiett." January 1, 1903 -- "A Lawyer with a Reputation." April 23, 1903 -- "The Thrasher Case." July 9, 1903 -- "Cupids Work." July 16, 1903 -- "Stabbed to Death." December 14, 1903 -- "Ashton Acquitted." March 3, 1904 -- "Pruiett Receives Office Safe"; "Lawrence Walker Acquitted"

Daily Ardmoreite, Ardmore, I.T.
February 10, 1891 -- "Putty Kills Thurlow." May 26, 1896 -- "Beatty Assassination." June 24, 1896 -- "Desperado Arrested." February 21, 1897 -- "Jennison M'Clure Dead." July 22, 1898 - "Murders Committed" November 1, 1899 -- "Pauls Valley Court" November 3, 1899 -- "Banished (Jury) From Court" December 3, 1899 -- "Stillwell Russell of Dallas" January 15, 1900 -- "Death Watch Set" (Charles Bias - see attached doc file) January 16, 1900 -- "Under the Gallows Shadow" June 10, 1900 -- "At the Jail" September 9, 1900 -- "This Land Our Home" September 13, 1900 -- "Tired of Dodging" September 19, 1900 -- "Killing at Iona" January-March, 1901 -- "Shooting at Thackerville"; "Charles Liddell Dies"; "Liddell;s Slayer Arrested"; "George Hancock Charged" January 27, 1901 -- "Shooting at Thackerville" February 5, 1901 -- "Liddell Dies from Wounds" March 4, 1901 -- "Liddell's Slayer Arrested" March 11, 1901 -- "George Hancock Charged" April 15, 1901 -- "Witch Killers Acquitted" July 9, 1902 -- "Some Dave Putty History" July 19, 1901 -- "Over Eighty Thousand Have Registered for 13,000 Homes" January 12, 1902 -- "The Lawyers Speeches" August 5, 1902 -- "Important Murder Case" November 4, 1902 -- "Bert Casey Gets Justice" November 5, 1902 -- "Grim Fate of Outlaws" January 7, 1903 -- "Deadly Fight" October 11, 1903 -- "The Ada Shooting" July 6, 1902 -- "Resist Arrest, Killed" November 22- December 30, 1920 -- :Clara Smith-Jake Hamon Shooting" March 23, 1921 -- "James A. Stillman Accuses Wife of Criminal Intimacy" March 24, 1921 -- "Mrs. Stillman" March 25, 1921 -- "STillman's Child"

-Linda McGill Wagner <----- Click Here
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"I was looking for some information on old grocery stores in Doughtery, okla. I am interested in this information because my family were from Big Canyon..If you could help I would appreciate it. Thank you." -Oneta omr4ok@sbcglobal.net
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"wild plum tree" <----- Click Here
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"Wanted to write you about Fort Washita which we visited recently. What a great site! I think much of the state is unaware of its existance or historical significance. I have created a Virtual tour of the location in hopes of bringing more interest. Should be viewed with windows media player version 9 for best results." <----- Click Here - this is the Cable/DSL version <----- Click Here - this is the dialup 56k version.
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"If you have popup ads all of the time try this from yahoo. I downloaded it this morning and it puts 2 little buttons on your toolbar and in ten minutes it had blocked 47 ads. Also my computer started running faster. Hope you don't need it but those Messenger service ads had taken over my computer completely." -Doug <----- Click Here
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Mr. Roy Roring who owns Roy W. Roring Oil Co. has again allowed me to photograph some of the old Oil Field Equipment that he owns. The first photo shows the pump jack and the original engine house. The pump jack is an IDECO unit which stands for International Derrick Equipment Company. I didn't see the model number but I found a tag on the unit with the date, September 1938 so it will be 66 years old next month. It's still in regular service and I don't think Roy is planning a retirement party for the old unit. Maybe he could give it an extra shot of grease! The pump jack was very interesting but the real find was inside the engine house. It was originally powered by a Twin Vertical Cylinder Superior Gas Engine as shown in the second photo. I have never seen this type of engine and I was amazed to see it still sitting there after all these years. An electric motor now operates the old IDECO unit so I guess the old Superior engine finally got to retire some years back. I'm assuming the engine was installed at the same time as the pump jack so it should be a 1938 year model as well. The photo doesn't do it justice as it is quite impressive to see up close. I'll try to go back and get some information from the engine plates. I didn't have my engine plate cleaning stuff with me at the time. (Where's my oil field hunter sidekick Kenneth Eck when you need him?) I'm posting some of my "Early Day Oil field Equipment of Southern Oklahoma" finds on the Internet for any of you Healdton Herald readers and Butch Bridges Newsletter readers to see. If you are interested in this kind of stuff just type the following link into your web browser and hit search. <----- Click Here

OR, go to Webshots.com and do a member search for "railheadok." I also have some of my Railroad photos posted there as well. Apparently there are lots of folks interested in seeing this kind of equipment because I have had over 13,000 total hits on the photographs since I started posting them earlier this year. I've had interesting emails and phone calls from folks and some Oil Companies from all over the country concerning the old oilfield equipment in our area. What's that old saying, "One man's junk is another man's treasure." (Roy, I'm not calling your equipment junk!) Seems that lots of out of state folks are interested in our rich oil field history. -Dwane Stevens onmp@juno.com <----- Click Here <----- Click Here
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"Hey there Butch. As always i enjoyed your newsletter......but i fell in love with Squeeky the squirrel. He reminds me of one we finally coaxed into a cabin i was staying at a state park. Of course I had to attach his picture. His name in Thumper! Thanks for all your great history!! -Tracy, in finally cooler Atlanta <----- Click Here
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"The story of the man and his dog and rabbit brought back a funny memory. Many years ago when my husband, Hurmon Anthony, was selling cars, he worked with James Carroll and Harold Rudd. We had a pet rabbit named "Hoppy." A dog knocked over his cage one night and broke Hoppy's leg. I took him to the vet and they said that since they did not know how much anesthetic to give a wild animal that he may not pull through. Later in the day they called to tell me that he didn't make it. My children and I were very upset and I called Hurmon to tearfully tell him that Hoppy had died. James Carroll told him that he had a freezer that we could freeze him in and Harold made a remark similar to James'. I went to Goldner's Florist and asked Mr. Goldner to make up a ticket for me for flowers for Hoppy and make it out to James and Harold. I then went down to the car lot and presented the ticket to them telling them that since they were so concerned about my rabbit that I was sure they would want him to have flowers. You should have seen their faces because they knew I was just the person that would do something like that. They didn't tease me anymore. The last trip Hurmon and I made to Arkansas a few months before he died in 1975, we found a soft drink bottle that had Chief on it. It was bottled by the Ardmore Coca Cola Co. I forgot the date on it but it was old. At that time James was working for the Coke Co. and asked Hurmon if he could take it down there. Hurmon died before getting it back, then James died. I don't know if Betty may still have it. I can never think to ask when I see her. Always look forward to Friday evening and T&T." -Frances
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The Daily Ardmoreite
December 10, 1912. The new clock on the court house is on another rampage and looks like a collection of young school girls that refuse to play. One face keeps correct time while the other three dissenting in as many opinions. As soon as the cold weather is over, it is expected that they will get it all together and tell the truth.
************
January 9, 1912. CONFESSES TO MANY BANK ROBBERIES Frank Holloway says he was implicated in robbery of banks in Oklahoma Chicago, IL--Frank Holloway confessed to the police today the he was concerned in the bank robberies of Panama and New Westminster, in which $450,000 was stolen. He also said he was wanted in two murders and many robberies in Oklahoma.
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January 10, 1912. A statue of Senator Stewart of Hugo will be unveiled at the Girls Industrial Institute and College at Chickasha next Saturday. Senator Stewart was the author of the bill creating the school. Judge Frank M. Hatley will deliver the address.
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January 21, 1912. FIND RELICS OF THE PAST Davis,OK--While a force of workmen were employed yesterday in "Park-o-Joy," a new recreation and outing place on Honey Creek, in the Arbuckle mountains, some relics of by-gone days were unearthed. these relics bear mute evidence of the changes which have been made during the past century or more in the Arbuckle mountain region. It has long been stated by many of the old Chickasaw Indians that this vicinity was at one time the burial place of a tribe of aborigines who roamed the mountains and that excavates would reveal many of the personal effects of the vanished race, owing to the ancient custom of burying their early possessions. No steps were taken to unearth the relics, however, and the discovery yesterday was accidental. The discovery consists of curiously wrought pottery and knives. There are also the parts of guns and a bullet mould. These are heavy with rust and from their pattern must have been manufactured prior to the war of 1812. Only small fragments of the firearms remain as the action of nature long since removed the wooden parts. Two of the guns were evidently muzzle loaders, "smooth-bored," while the third appears to be a type used by the Puritans. The bullet mould was so rusted that when picked up it broke into small sections. C.J. Cox, engineer in charge of the work, stated today that he would probably send them to the Smithsonian Institution or give them to the Oklahoma historical society. He said old Indians believe these relics belong to a race of aborigines long since extinct, and predicts that as further excavations are made other important evidence of the past will be unearthed. He said many relics could be found around the crest of burning mountain, in that region, and expressed the hope that along Honey creek, when the grading gangs reach the deep canyon, valuable scientific discoveries would be made.
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May 4, 1954. RAMBLING REPORTER...by George Norris Ed Sandlin, vice-president of the First National Bank, begged to differ with Tate Glenn and Bob Watkins about the location of the first Federal jail. He says it was never near Daubes but on North Washington street on a lot owned by Mrs. Vernor where Tom Wilkes' cleaning plant now stands. The jail was in frame buildings back of the present building and were burned in the big fire of 1895. Ed says he well remembers the Annabelle fire-hose cart for he was No.2 nozzleman and helped to pull it quite frequently. He even remembered that Von Dollins was his supervisor, No. 1 nozzleman. Ed says that the L.L. Stowe fire engine was bought first and the Annabelle hose cart shortly thereafter.
***
Those mentioned that were all bundled up on the bleachers to watch a cold night's ballgame between the Cardinals and McAlester were: Mrs. Will Easley; Jerry Putman; Lizzie Jameson; Carl Lindahis; Johnny, Richard, & Esther Bagwell; Joe Frank,Gladys, JoAnn & Linda Roberson; John Wallis (an 80-odd year old fan); the Gid Cunninghams; Doug King; Fleet Cooper; Bob Barnett; the Henry Keith's; the John Poindexter's; and the Max Jones'.
*******
Betty (Mrs. Wayne) Barnes of Healdton, says she lived in Ardmore most of her life and never did "make" this column. Her husband, Wayne, works for Husky Guns, well shooters, out of Healdton. Other members of the Barnes family are Kelley, Jimmie and Dewaine. Betty's mother is Mrs. Clyde Leeper of Ardmore.
*****
Betty Colvert was indulging in a coke at Taylor's drug along with Betty Barnes and casually mentioned the fact she had a husband, Rex, also working for Husky, and a trio of youngsters, Jerry, Mike, and Lonnie.
****
Also mentioned at the Taylor drugstore were: Sue Hess; Joyce Hill, Joyce Riddle; Jo Beth Garrett; Nancy Hawes; Pat Kerps; Margaret Speakes; "Bear" Kale; Jack Howe, Bert Howe; Billie & Myra Crowder; Mrs. Donnie Laney; Sue Harper; Fay Taylor; Janean McBride; Nadean Ramirez.
*******
Edith Priddy Barker, sister of the Ardmore Priddy boys, introduced me to her husband, Speedy, cabinet maker. Her youngsters are Bill and Marilyn Hamm.
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The Evening News, Ada, Oklahoma September 18, 1911. FURTHER DETAILS OF THE DEATH OF JOHN PIRTLE Hart, OK --This neighborhood was greatly shocked Thursday by the finding of the dead body of Johnnie Pirtle, the 19 year old son of Mrs. Kittie Jackson, with a bullet wound in his head. Johnnie left home Wednesday morning on his horse, "Syrock" to look for his horse that had got away from him the night before. Some time about 11 o'clock Syrock came up to Mr. Hurley's house dragging his rope. Mr. Hurley and Mr. Poe caught the horse and Mr. Poe took him home, and finding no one there turned the horse in the lot. Wednesday night a searching party hunted all night for Johnnie and continued their search until near noon thinking his horse had thrown him, and either killed him or crippled him. About noon Johnnie's uncle, Isaac Fulsom discovered the body about 350 yards southeast of their house. He fired two shots, the signal agreed upon by the searching parties. Within a few moments, there were about fifty or more men on the ground. On the account of its being quite a distance to the nearest justice of the peace, and owing to the condition of the body, the people selected ten reliable men to make an examination of the body. They found that he died from the effects of a bullet wound which entered his head at the top of his ear. His revolver was lying near his feet, with one cartridge exploded. Johnnie was well liked by everyone and was an especial favorite of all the young people, and the tragedy has cast a deep gloom over the entire neighborhood. All the neighborhood feels deeply for Mrs. Jackson, Johnnie was her only child. The body was laid away in the Hart cemetery Friday at three o'clock by the Woodmen of the World.
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"don't want to sound like a big time operator but at one time i did have a secretary. she was from back east and her husband was with the treasury department so she moved around alot. well i dictated a letter (once) and closed with "regards, gerald theo cobb" i looked at the results. most was acceptable until i got to the closing. it read "Gerald, the old cop" another time my onery cuzin back there called me. i was on the phone at the time and when i got off that call she came in and told me my cuz had called and "what does fixinto mean?" i didn't know what she had reference to and asked. she said "your relative said he was fixinto go home" "i'm fixinto bust your head open" love it!! another- "iwasgunna" i was going to do that afterwhal. what one "does for a livin" one time i was cross-examining a smartelick doctor and aks him "when you released her from treatment did you know what she did for a livin? "would you repeat the question? i don't understand. (the woman had injured her back and she was a baggage handler at one of the hotels) after i finished and the doctor was leaving the witness stand the judge (who was an OU football fan) said "doctor, i think you just got ardmorized" (reference the selman brothers when they both hit the runner as being selmanized) believe it or not that judge is now the chief justice of the nevada supreme court. C YALL." -Gerald Cobb
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"I read that ants will not cross a cinnamon barrier so I tried it and it really works. I put down just a little cinnamon powder across ant path and they disappeared. Went away. So, if you be bothered by ants try a little cinnamon powder and see what happens. If you try it, please let me know how it works for you. I swear they were gone in minutes."
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"My wife's car stalled in the middle of a very busy intersection. stalled? it just quit. no warning, lights, bells or whistles which was a part of the car. She called AAA and asked for a "Wrecker" to come and deliver the junker to the Honda place. The AAA girl said "I don't know what a wrecker is" seems she only knew the term "tow truck". -Gerald Cobb in Las Vegas
------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Evening News, Ada, Oklahoma September 18, 1911
FURTHER DETAILS OF THE DEATH OF JOHN PIRTLE Hart, OK --This neighborhood was greatly shocked Thursday by the finding of the dead body of Johnnie Pirtle, the 19 year old son of Mrs. Kittie Jackson, with a bullet wound in his head. Johnnie left home Wednesday morning on his horse, "Syrock" to look for his horse that had got away from him the night before. Some time about 11 o'clock Syrock came up to Mr. Hurley's house dragging his rope. Mr. Hurley and Mr. Poe caught the horse and Mr. Poe took him home, and finding no one there turned the horse in the lot. Wednesday night a searching party hunted all night for Johnnie and continued their search until near noon thinking his horse had thrown him, and either killed him or crippled him. About noon Johnnie's uncle, Isaac Fulsom discovered the body about 350 yards southeast of their house. He fired two shots, the signal agreed upon by the searching parties. Within a few moments, there were about fifty or more men on the ground. On the account of its being quite a distance to the nearest justice of the peace, and owing to the condition of the body, the people selected ten reliable men to make an examination of the body. They found that he died from the effects of a bullet wound which entered his head at the top of his ear. His revolver was lying near his feet, with one cartridge exploded. Johnnie was well liked by everyone and was an especial favorite of all the young people, and the tragedy has cast a deep gloom over the entire neighborhood. All the neighborhood feels deeply for Mrs. Jackson, Johnnie was her only child. The body was laid away in the Hart cemetery Friday at three o'clock by the Woodmen of the World.
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The Daily Ardmoreite. December 10, 1912 The new clock on the court house is on another rampage and looks like a collection of young school girls that refuse to play. One face keeps correct time while the other three dissenting in as many opinions. As soon as the cold weather is over, it is expected that they will get it all together and tell the truth.
************
January 9, 1912 CONFESSES TO MANY BANK ROBBERIES Frank Holloway says he was implicated in robbery of banks in Oklahoma. Chicago, IL--Frank Holloway confessed to the police today the he was concerned in the bank robberies of Panama and New Westminster, in which $450,000 was stolen. He also said he was wanted in two murders and many robberies in Oklahoma.
**************
January 10, 1912 A statue of Senator Stewart of Hugo will be unveiled at the Girls Industrial Institute and College at Chickasha next Saturday. Senator Stewart was the author of the bill creating the school. Judge Frank M. Hatley will deliver the address.
*****************
January 21, 1912 FIND RELICS OF THE PAST Davis,OK--While a force of workmen were employed yesterday in "Park-o-Joy," a new recreation and outing place on Honey Creek, in the Arbuckle mountains, some relics of by-gone days were unearthed. These relics bear mute evidence of the changes which have been made during the past century or more in the Arbuckle mountain region. It has long been stated by many of the old Chickasaw Indians that this vicinity was at one time the burial place of a tribe of aborigines who roamed the mountains and that excavates would reveal many of the personal effects of the vanished race, owing to the ancient custom of burying their early possessions. No steps were taken to unearth the relics, however, and the discovery yesterday was accidental. The discovery consists of curiously wrought pottery and knives. There are also the parts of guns and a bullet mould. These are heavy with rust and from their pattern must have been manufactured prior to the war of 1812. Only small fragments of the firearms remain as the action of nature long since removed the wooden parts. Two of the guns were evidently muzzle loaders, "smooth-bored," while the third appears to be a type used by the Puritans. The bullet mould was so rusted that when picked up it broke into small sections. C.J. Cox, engineer in charge of the work, stated today that he would probably send them to the Smithsonian Institution or give them to the Oklahoma historical society. He said old Indians believe these relics belong to a race of aborigines long since extinct, and predicts that as further excavations are made other important evidence of the past will be unearthed. He said many relics could be found around the crest of burning mountain, in that region, and expressed the hope that along Honey creek, when the grading gangs reach the deep canyon, valuable scientific discoveries would be made.
***************************
May 4, 1954
RAMBLING REPORTER...by George Norris Ed Sandlin, vice-president of the First National Bank, begged to differ with Tate Glenn and Bob Watkins about the location of the first Federal jail. He says it was never near Daubes but on North Washington street on a lot owned by Mrs. Vernon where Tom Wilkes' cleaning plant now stands. The jail was in frame buildings back of the present building and were burned in the big fire of 1895. Ed says he well remembers the Annabelle fire-hose cart for he was No.2 nozzleman and helped to pull it quite frequently. He even remembered that Von Dollins was his supervisor, No. 1 nozzleman. Ed says that the L.L. Stowe fire engine was bought first and the Annabelle hose cart shortly thereafter.
***
Those mentioned that were all bundled up on the bleachers to watch a cold night's ballgame between the Cardinals and McAlester were: Mrs. Will Easley; Jerry Putman; Lizzie Jameson; Carl Lindahis; Johnny, Richard, & Esther Bagwell; Joe Frank,Gladys, JoAnn & Linda Roberson; John Wallis (an 80-odd year old fan); the Gid Cunninghams; Doug King; Fleet Cooper; Bob Barnett; the Henry Keith's; the John Poindexter's; and the Max Jones'.
*******
Betty (Mrs. Wayne) Barnes of Healdton, says she lived in Ardmore most of her life and never did "make" this column. Her husband, Wayne, works for Husky Guns, well shooters, out of Healdton. Other members of the Barnes family are Kelley, Jimmie and Dewaine. Betty's mother is Mrs. Clyde Leeper of Ardmore.
*****
Betty Colvert was indulging in a coke at Taylor's drug along with Betty Barnes and casually mentioned the fact she had a husband, Rex, also working for Husky, and a trio of youngsters, Jerry, Mike, and Lonnie.
****
Also mentioned at the Taylor drugstore were: Sue Hess; Joyce Hill, Joyce Riddle; Jo Beth Garrett; Nancy Hawes; Pat Kerps; Margaret Speakes; "Bear" Kale; Jack Howe, Bert Howe; Billie & Myra Crowder; Mrs. Donnie Laney; Sue Harper; Fay Taylor; Janean McBride; Nadean Ramirez.
*******
Edith Priddy Barker, sister of the Ardmore Priddy boys, introduced me to her husband, Speedy, cabinet maker. Her youngsters are Bill and Marilyn Hamm.
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Ever since June 2000 when we had the dedication of the Remembrance Memorial Part at the airpark and that first memorial, what came to be called the American Flyers Memorial, Paul Mitchell has helped with the mowing. Paul lived in the first house just north of the memorial, and used his riding lawnmower to mow the larger areas around the monuments. I mowed the immediate area in and around the monuments, but Paul took a load of me by using his riding lawnmower to keep the out perimeter mowed. Paul Mitchell died suddenly August 12th. Thanks Paul for all your help, people all over the country appreciated your volunteer work in helping keep the memorial site beautiful. <----- Click Here

SOAP BOX: The past month I have been collecting all the junk faxes we receive at the county commissioners office here in Ardmore. From July 15th to August 15th, 2004 we received slightly over 1 a day. About 35 for the 4 week period. So, with about 15 fax machines scattered all around the county government complexes, and taking into consideration some offices receive more junk faxes then others, I estimate over 5,000 sheets of paper a year are being used for worthless, unsolicited and illegally received faxes by Carter county government. Multiply that times 77 counties, now we are talking about maybe 500,000 sheets or more of wasted paper per year by county governments in Oklahoma because of unsolicited junk faxes. And the ink wasted to print them? I ain't even going there.

I said illegal junk faxes. I remember years ago I read or heard on the news it was illegal to send unsolicited junk faxes. There is a Federal law (1991) against it...... 47 U.S.C. Section 227, to be exact. "Restrictions on Use of Telephone Equipment". <----- Click Here

The 30 day collection of faxes I saved can all be placed in basically 3 categories: Vacations, Refinancing Loans, and Stock Tips. And I would bet all those faxes are being sent by less than half dozen mass broadcast fax equipment and their companies across the U.S. But if there is a good side to all this, there does seem to be a line these mass faxers won't cross.... porn. We have yet to received sexually oriented faxes, unlike the emails, thank God.

Some have told me, "there is a toll free number on the faxes you call to be removed." True, most of them do list a "removal number" (some dont even have the Station Identifier on the fax as required by law) but I have called those numbers with little success or none at all of having our fax number removed. But this is what chaps my cheeks, you should not have to call a number to be removed from some mass fax database when its illegal for them to send the faxes to you in the first place. So, when we consider all the fax machines in Oklahoma that receive unsolicited junk faxes, be it: city, county, state, businesses, corporations, non-profits and even the growing number of privately owned faxes in peoples homes, we are talking about a lot of wasted trees.

Excellent website on the junk fax problem. <----- Click Here

I did take a pic of all the faxes we received the four week period from July 15 to August 15, 2004 for what good it will do. <----- Click Here

"Opportunities are usually disguised as hard work, so most people don't recognize them." -Ann Landers

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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Saturday August 14, 2004 T&T Weekly - Circulation over 4,000 Vol 8 Issue 382

I had a visitor this week from Saginaw, Texas by the name of J.R. England. He was in town and had an old soft drink bottle to show me. It was bottled at the Ardmore Bottling Works, Ardmore, I.T. meaning Indian Territory, meaning before 1907. How much before 1907? J.R. said he thinks this particular bottle stopped being made around 1899, so it must go way back. J.R. is wanting to learn all he can about the Ardmore Bottling Company and this bottle. This bottle is still capped and has coke, sarsparilla or some kind of concoction in it! J.R. does not have email, but if you have any info to pass along to him, his phone number in Saginaw, TX is 817-232-0648 and his mailing address is 205 Pimlico Way, Saginaw, TX 76179. <----- Click Here <----- Click Here

A Reader emailed me the program for the 1969 Miss Ardmore. It lists a lot of the people who helped the show together including the officers of the Ardmore Jaycee Janes. Some of the queen contestants that year was: Paulette Collins, Polly Murphy, Beth Howell, Brenda Sue Dobson, Donna Nicholson, Sharon Brinkley, Ingrid Maria Ritchie, Janene Elaine Hilton, Mary Elizabeth Beard. Barbara Zimmerman was Miss Ardmore 1968. Boy these bring back a lot of memories. <----- Click Here <----- Click Here <----- Click Here <----- Queen Contestants Click Here <----- Queen Contestants Click Here

We have a squirrel coming around the courthouse everyday, and several of us are feeding him pecans. We have named him Squeeky and he's fun to watch. Once he knows you, he will take the pecan right our of your hand. He is storing those pecans fast as we can give them to him. I wonder if he is trying to tell us something: its going to be a long, cold winter? <----- Click Here

I told everyone I was going to buy a watermelon a couple of weeks ago at the farmer's market that's held at the Ardmore depot every saturday morning. Well, I got behind, but did make it down there last saturday. Instead of a watermelon, I bought a cantaloupe. I guess everyone knows how to tell a sweet, ripe cantaloupe dont they? You smell the top on the cantaloupe where the stem broke away from the melon, looking for that strong sweet delicious smell. The first place I looked last saturday, wally world, theirs didnt even have a smell, so I went on down to the depot, found some with the right smell, and sure enough, it was sweet. But the best cantaloupe I've ate this summer was just 3 weeks ago, and it came from the William's fruit stand at the farmers market in Durant on Evergreen Street. Boy was that sweet and delicious. <----- Click Here <----- Click Here

Last week someone sent in some info on the old Roy Johnson mansion out at Dornick Hills. Even more famous then his house is his above ground mausoleum. It just south of the main gate at Rosehill. <----- Click Here

And just a few feet from the Johnson mausoleum is the Apple mausoleum. As teens us kids use to go there in the middle of the night, knock on the door, and ask, "Is anybody home?" Boy, the crazy things we did as kids, but it was all good clean fun. <----- Click Here

Several of the Carmon grave markers on my mother's side of the family at Rosehill had sunk down several inches below ground level over the years. This week I hired P.A. Russell of Lone Grove to go out and level them up. He sure did a great job, and at a very resonable price. I sure wish I could find someone who still pours/makes those long flat markers. I was told 20 years ago that no one in Ardmore made them anymore. Maybe a Reader knows who might make a couple for me? <----- Click Here <----- Click Here

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

1907 The Ardmore Electric Railway Company (trolley cars) begins operations on Main Street. Tracks eventually ran west on Main from the train station to C Street, north on C to 8th, west on 8th to Wolverton, and north on Wolverton to Dornick Hills and the car barn. Service ended in 1922.
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"I have lived near stonewall since 1972. my wife drove a school bus for stonewall for 13 years and know a lot more of the local people than I do. I'll make a few inquiries and see if I can find someone familiar with this grocery store. I know of a pleasant hill community with an old church and cemetery north and east of stonewall about 5 miles. perhaps this is the area you are talking about."-John Lashbrook, stonewall ok.
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"Cisco Road went all the way to Cisco Beach not Crisco Beach. It is where you go to Elephant Rock, you just kept going east and that was main beach back in 50's. I have several pictures taken there. It had a pier and was a nice beach, but after the highway changed to go to lodge, the beach was unused and grew up and wasn't taken care of. I live near there now and have since 1944 and I don't think there was ever a Crisco Beach." -Rita C
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"The picture of the "castle" at Turner Falls almost brought tears! I lived with my parents the summer of 1942 at the Bar C Ranch on US Route 77, just north of the horseshoe bend and south of the Cedarvale Restaurant and skating rink. Mom and dad operated a souvenir shop and I can still see the rattlesnake ash trays and taste the cactus candy we sold. Directly across the highway was located an old guy who offered mule rides into the mountains for a small price. I got to ride free at least once every day because all the mules were not "sold out." I took the foot path along Honey Creek past the castle to the Blue Hole at Turner Falls to swim daily. What a life for a 13 year old boy! Anyway, as Bob Hope used to say, "thanks for the memories."
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Someone had asked about rolls served at school cafeterias. This recipe was given to me by Muriel Swango, a dear friend and supervisor of the Food Service at Welch Schools. I don't know if this is the desired recipe, but...
BASIC YEAST ROLL RECIPE (1970s)
18 servings
From: Nannie Huffman - Broken Arrow Schools

1-pkg. dry yeast
1/4 cup lukewarm water
1/3 cup shortening
1/4 cup sugar
1/8 tsp. salt
1/2 cup boiling water
1-egg, beaten
3-1/2 cups sifted flour
2 Tbsp. butter or margarine (melted)
Dissolve dry yeast in lukewarm water and let stand for 3 minutes. In mixing bowl, place shortening, sugar, salt and boiling water. Stir until dissolved. Cool. Blend yeast and shortening well. Add egg, beat well. Gradually add flour and beat constantly. Place dough in a greased bowl. Cover with a cloth and let rise for 1 hour or until double in bulk. Shape into your favorite roll and let rise 1 hour. Bake on a greased pan in a 450 oven for 12-15 minutes. Brush with melted butter or margarine.
-Anna Marie.
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The Evening News, Ada, OK
February 9, 1911
Oscar Collins was here from Roff yesterday afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. C.F. Bhrashear were here from Francis on business. Mr. Bhrashear has the contract to build six big store buildings in Allen. Dr. King made a trip to Stonewall today.
***************
February 10, 1911
Oscar Collins was here from Roff today.
*****************
July 18, 1911
TRAGEDY AT ROFF MONDAY EVENING
About 7 o'clock yesterday evening a tragedy occurred at Roff that resulted in the death of Oscar Collins and will probably also end in the death of Pate Beauchamp. >From the best information obtainable, it appears that the two men, who until a week ago had been the best of friends, had some words over the matter of running the fire team through the streets at a high speed. Ed Bunyard was the driver at that time and Collins, who was both city marshal and deputy sheriff, thought the run was made for the purpose of irritating him. Bunyard was discharged and Beauchamp, who had been Collins deputy, was put in his place. He was guilty of the same offense, it is said, and Collins considered that it was a scheme to run matters over him. Yesterday while somewhat under the influence of liquor, he renewed the trouble with Beauchamp and a fight followed, in which Collins was knocked or thrown down. Beauchamp, it is said, grabbed him by the hair and hammered his head against the floor a few times. When they were finally separated, Collins went away swearing that no man could treat him in that manner and live. Everett Deacon took him home and he tried to get his gun but his wife and Deacon would not let him have it. He then went to Jones' hardware store and securing a shotgun, went back to the store of the Brass Hardware Co., where Beauchamp was employed. As he approached the door Beauchamp shot him twice with a pistol. Collins went off a few feet and sat down a moment. Then telling the crowd that he was dead man anyway, he swore he would kill Beauchamp before he died. He again approached the door and fired a load of shot into his opponents abdomen. Beauchamp shot twice more and Collins fell dead. All four shots took effect. A bullet passed through each breast, one through his arm and the other struck him in the region of the stomach, although it was rather glancing. Collins is survived by a wife and a child. Beauchamp is a single man. Collins was ordinarily a peaceable man, although inclined to be quarrelsome when drinking. He was a man who feared nothing and of late had done some good work in enforcing the law. At the last city election he led the ticket. Both men were popular with the entire citizenship of Roff and Sheriff Mitchell states that the tragedy is deeply regretted by all. When news of the trouble reached Ada Sheriff Mitchell, Deputy R.E. Duncan and County Attorney Wimbish at once left for Roff, returning this morning.
*******************
July 19, 1911
FUNERAL OF OSCAR COLLINS
The funeral of Oscar Collins took place at Roff yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock, conducted by the Masonic fraternity of which he was a member. T.R. Cardwell, who was there at the time, states that the procession was the longest ever seen at Roff. Expressions of deep regret were heard on every hand. (O.E. Collins was born November 10, 1875 and died July 17, 1911 and was buried in East Hill Cemetery, Roff, Oklahoma)
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July 21, 1911
The news from Pate Beauchamp of Roff continues to be of an encouraging nature. His condition this afternoon is said to be better and hope of his ultimate recovery is now much stronger. (then three days later...) Beauchamp is still improving today. He is feeling well enough to want to sit up and his recovery is now confidently expected.
**********************
Sept 16, 1911
COMMERCIAL HOTEL WILL CHANGE HANDS
Yesterday a deal was made where by Claud Price and wife sold their lease and furniture of the Commercial hotel to Mrs. Oscar Collins of Roff. They will give possession at once.
***
WAS IT MURDER OR SUICIDE
This morning Deputy Sheriff Eli Morris phoned in word that John Pirtle, an Indian, the son of Joe Pirtle, had been found dead near his home, in the neighborhood of Hart. He had been shot in the right side of the head with a revolver and had evidently died instantly. Deceased was unmarried and about 22 years old. From the account given by Mr. Morris, it appears that Pirtle's horse got away from him Tuesday night and Wednesday morning he caught another horse and started off to hunt the other, riding bareback. He had not returned by night and his family becoming uneasy, gave the alarm. The neighbors turned out and hunted all night and until noon Thursday before the body was found. Isaac Folsom, an uncle of the dead man made the discovery. The body was about a quarter of a mile from the home of the Pirtle's. When found Pirtle was stretched out on the ground with his hat still on his head. His pistol was on the ground a short distance from his feet and one chamber was empty. There is some reason to think it was a case of suicide, but the fact that there was no sign of powder burn around the wound and that the gun was fully ten feet from his head would seem to disprove this theory. The manner in which his body was stretched out indicates that he might have been asleep and that the murderer had slipped his own gun from his pocket and killed him with it. Mr. Morris reached the scene of the tragedy late Thursday and has been working on the case ever since. The only clue thus far discovered is that three or four persons saw Pirtle riding along the road in company with a stranger on a big white horse. No one was close enough to identify the man, however, and no trace of him has been found since the killing.
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Woodworth lynching
<----- Click Here
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Some readers might want to adjust their computers such that the pictures that download remain the size where a person can read the text. Here is how to do that.
Open Internet Explorer
Click on VIEW
Click on Internet Options Scroll down to Multimedia and uncheck the option: Enable Automatic Image Resizing The letter written by Mac MacGalliard will be full size then.
-Gene
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The Evening News, Ada Oklahoma
April 3, 1907. At Roff on Tuesday the election passed off quietly, and the following city officers were elected: For mayor, L.R. Boyd; for treasure, John G. James; for attorney, J.L. Anderson, for recorder, Joseph Anderson; for assessor and collector, L.J. Shook; for marshal, Oscar Collins. About 265 votes was the voting strength demonstrated.
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January 19, 1909 Deputy Sheriff Collins of Roff was in town.
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September 10, 1910
At The Sheriff's Office
Oscar Collins of Roff, placed Howard Menely in the county jail yesterday. Menely was charged and convicted of stealing some wagon wheels and was fined $10 and cost amounting to eleven dollars, and will have to serve a jail sentence of 15 days.
********
March 07, 1910
WILL HENDRICKS IN LAW'S GRASP
Hundreds of people who were congregated at the Frisco depot and around the courthouse yesterday afternoon when the 3:04 train arrived were sorely disappointed when the officers did not alight from the train with Will Hendricks, outlaw, who has been very much wanted at Paris, TX, to finish serving a life sentence for murder. Hendricks was caught about noon yesterday at Roff by a posse of Ada man hunters. Saturday night about mid-night the following persons left Ada for Roff near where Hendricks was operating. Deputy Sheriff's Goyne and Jim Adair, Chief of Police Culver, J.M. McCarty, Hookie Miller and John Smith. They went in buggies to the home of Joe Daniels. Hendricks' brother-in-law, three miles west of Roff. Hendricks was said to be there and the house was surrounded but the bird had flown. After some time, the officers heard that Hendricks was at Roff and, not having eaten breakfast, they arrived in Roff at 12 o'clock noon Sunday, Culver and Smith arriving abour fifteen minutes in advance of the others. All morning Hendricks had been making gun plays while riding up and down the streets and had the inhabitants inside their houses. The sheriff's office here was telephoned that the outlaw was shooting up the town and that help was wanted at Roff quick. The people were informed that a posse had left here the night before and were likely to put a stop to Hendricks fun at most any time. When the officers rode into town Hendricks and a well digger named Jess Lucas were in front of a residence apparently awaiting their arrival. The first shot was fired by Hendricks and was answered by the officers at a distance of about 75 yards. The shots did no damage but succeeded in sobering up Lucas, who had been drinking for several hours. He handed his Winchester to Hendricks and raised his hands. Hendricks got busy with the Winchester firing two times but hit no one. Several shots were fired at him and one went through his clothes. After this warm reception Hendricks ran into the house but immediately appeared at the door with his hands in the air. He walked to the fence where he was relieved of his weapon which was an automatic six-shooter and about 200 rounds of cartridges. Chief of Police Culver put his hand on his shoulder and Hendricks said; "Don't kill me, I've given up." Jim McCarty took his gun from him. There were about fifteen shots fired, but no one was injured, except a boy who lived in the house where Hendricks sought refuge. He was hit in one cheek with buck shot. The posse boarded the afternoon train with the intention of bringing Lucas and Hendricks to this city but when the large crowd at the depot was seen they decided to take Hendricks to Holdenville and return him today. He was in charge of Deputy Sheriff Goyne and Chief of Police Culver Lucas and the other officers unloaded here and he (Lucas) was put in the county jail. Yesterday afternoon Hendricks father and Chas. Fondrem were brought in by Hookey, Miller and John Chapman and placed in jail, charged with assisting a criminal. This makes three of the Hendricks outfit in jail. Brit Hendricks having been brought in several days ago. Both Hendricks and Lucas, it is said, were pretty well jagged. It seems that Lucas has never been mixed up with the Hendricks gang but got a neat jag aboard yesterday and desired to help Bill fight his enemies. The taking of Hendricks was so easy that it was surprising as he was expected to die before being taken. The prediction was freely made that he would kill several men before he would be captured, which would be after he was unable to shoot. The thing that led people to believe he would not be taken alive was the life sentence in Texas and his reputation as a bad man. There are five who will probably participate in the reward of $650 being Miller, McCarty, Culver, Goyne, and Adair. Smith did not take part in the shooting business. Boldness can be attributed as the undoing of Hendricks. Several times during the past few weeks he has called by telephone and had conversations with officers, daring them to come and get him. Deputy Sheriff McDonald of Paris, TX, spent several days with Deputy Oscar Collins hunting him but there was nothing doing. One night he appeared at a dance near Roff and shot up the place because the fiddler quit playing. He exhibited a roll of green backs as big as a man's arm. Most everybody at the dance recognized him, but so disregardful of his identity was he that he did not care. Will Hendricks arrived in Ada from Holdenville this morning in charge of Chief of Police Culver and Deputy Sheriff Goyne and put in jail. He will be held here for the Paris TX officers and after the reward matter is adjusted. There was a reward of $300 offered by Oklahoma and $350 by Texas. Hendricks was in a talkative mood while on his way here and told the officers that he was arranging to leave the country for parts unknown, hoping to ever keep out of the way of the law. However he expressed his confidence that he wouldn't have to serve his time in the Federal penitentiary. Joe Daniels, Hendrick' brother-in-law was arrested today and placed under a $1000 bond charged of aiding and abetting Will Hendricks. His hearing is set for March 17.
*********
March 11, 1910
AN ECHO OF WILL HENDRICK'S CAPTURE
DIFFICULTY ARISES OVER GUN TAKEN FROM HIM
Deputy Sheriff Collins Demands It From Jim McCarty at Court House
An echo of the Hendricks capture was heard yesterday at the sheriff's office and the details as gathered there are that Jim McCarty, one of the men who went after Hendrix, went into the office, having in his possession one of Hendrix's 45 calibre automatic pistols which he was going to keep to satisfy a dept of $35 which he said Hendrix owed him. Oscar Collins, deputy sheriff of Roff was in the office on business and asked McCarty is if he was an officer or had any right to carry a gun. McCarty is said to have told him no, and Collins as an officer, asked him for the gun. McCarty refused to give up the gun. He pointed it at Collins and told him he would shoot if he didn't leave him alone. Collins attempted to reason the matter with him by telling him he was his friend, etc. They went out of the court house and McCarty again pointed the gun at Collins, repeating that he would shoot him if he didn't leave him alone. The men went into the Pontotoc cafe, Collins holding McCarty by the left hand, still asking for the gun. Hookie Miller and others were in the cafe and McCarty gave Miller the gun. Miller put it in the waistband of his trousers and Collins immediately grabbed it, saying he would give it to the proper authorities as he had no desire to keep it. He offered it to the undersheriff but he refused it, saying he had no right to it. Collins also offered it to a deputy sheriff, but he refused it. Collins returned to Roff yesterday.
********
PLACING CREDIT
We have been informed that the list of names of posse concerned in the capture of Hendrix given the Ada News by one of the parties, contained the names of Ed Fussell and Pate Beauchamp. Yet their published report omitted these names. We ask why? Ed was with the boys on every night spent in the sticks. They came here on word from Ed. Ed rode out and brought the posse back to get Hendrix. The report that Ed was held up by Hendrix is absolutely false. It is not right that a brave man be slandered in this way. And every one of the posse should have credit for his part in the affair--Roff Eagle. The several reports the Evening News received of the above mentioned affair did not contain the names of Fussell and Beauchamp, which is the reason they were not given. The Eagle contradicts itself by saying the Evening News did not mention Ed's name and then saying we slandered him by reproving that he was held up by Hendrix. If he was held up we did not hear about it until we read it in the Eagle. This paper is perfectly willing that both Ed and Pate shall have credit due them and with this aim we today reproduce the Eagles article which very briefly dwells on their names.
******************
February 9, 1911
Oscar Collins was here from Roff yesterday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. C.F. Bhrashear were here from Francis on business. Mr. Bhrashear has the contract to build six big store buildings in Allen.
Dr. King made a trip to Stonewall today.
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July 18, 1911
TRAGEDY AT ROFF MONDAY EVENING
About 7 o'clock yesterday evening a tragedy occurred at Roff that resulted in the death of Oscar Collins and will probably also end in the death of Pate Beauchamp. >From the best information obtainable, it appears that the two men, who until a week ago had been the best of friends, had some words over the matter of running the fire team through the streets at a high speed. Ed Bunyard was the driver at that time and Collins, who was both city marshal and deputy sheriff, thought the run was made for the purpose of irritating him. Bunyard was discharged and Beauchamp, who had been Collins deputy, was put in his place. He was guilty of the same offense, it is said, and Collins considered that it was a scheme to run matters over him. Yesterday while somewhat under the influence of liquor, he renewed the trouble with Beauchamp and a fight followed, in which Collins was knocked or thrown down. Beauchamp, it is said, grabbed him by the hair and hammered his head against the floor a few times. When they were finally separated, Collins went away swearing that no man could treat him in that manner and live. Everett Deacon took him home and he tried to get his gun but his wife and Deacon would not let him have it. He then went to Jones' hardware store and securing a shotgun, went back to the store of the Brass Hardware Co., where Beauchamp was employed. As he approached the door Beauchamp shot him twice with a pistol. Collins went off a few feet and sat down a moment. Then telling the crowd that he was dead man anyway, he swore he would kill Beauchamp before he died. He again approached the door and fired a load of shot into his opponents abdomen. Beauchamp shot twice more and Collins fell dead. All four shots took effect. A bullet passed through each breast, one through his arm and the other struck him in the region of the stomach, although it was rather glancing. Collins is survived by a wife and a child. Beauchamp is a single man. Collins was ordinarily a peaceable man, although inclined to be quarrelsome when drinking. He was a man who feared nothing and of late had done some good work in enforcing the law. At the last city election he led the ticket. Both men were popular with the entire citizenship of Roff and Sheriff Mitchell states that the tragedy is deeply regretted by all. When news of the trouble reached Ada Sheriff Mitchell, Deputy R.E. Duncan and County Attorney Wimbish at once left for Roff, returning this morning.
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July 19, 1911
FUNERAL OF OSCAR COLLINS
The funeral of Oscar Collins took place at Roff yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock, conducted by the Masonic fraternity of which he was a member. T.R. Cardwell, who was there at the time, states that the procession was the longest ever seen at Roff. Expressions of deep regret were heard on every hand. (O.E. Collins was born November 10, 1875 and died July 17, 1911 and was buried in East Hill Cemetery, Roff, Oklahoma)
*********************
July 21, 1911
The news from Pate Beauchamp of Roff continues to be of an encouraging nature. His condition this afternoon is said to be better and hope of his ultimate recovery is now much stronger. (then three days later...) Beauchamp is still improving today. He is feeling well enough to want to sit up and his recovery is now confidently expected.
**********************
Sept 16, 1911
COMMERCIAL HOTEL WILL CHANGE HANDS
Yesterday a deal was made where by Claud Price and wife sold their lease and furniture of the Commercial hotel to Mrs. Oscar Collins of Roff. They will give possession at once.
***
WAS IT MURDER OR SUICIDE
This morning Deputy Sheriff Eli Morris phoned in word that John Pirtle, an Indian, the son of Joe Pirtle, had been found dead near his home, in the neighborhood of Hart. He had been shot in the right side of the head with a revolver and had evidently died instantly. Deceased was unmarried and about 22 years old. From the account given by Mr. Morris, it appears that Pirtle's horse got away from him Tuesday night and Wednesday morning he caught another horse and started off to hunt the other, riding bareback. He had not returned by night and his family becoming uneasy, gave the alarm. The neighbors turned out and hunted all night and until noon Thursday before the body was found. Isaac Folsom, an uncle of the dead man made the discovery. The body was about a quarter of a mile from the home of the Pirtle's. When found Pirtle was stretched out on the ground with his hat still on his head. His pistol was on the ground a short distance from his feet and one chamber was empty. There is some reason to think it was a case of suicide, but the fact that there was no sign of powder burn around the wound and that the gun was fully ten feet from his head would seem to disprove this theory. The manner in which his body was stretched out indicates that he might have been asleep and that the murderer had slipped his own gun from his pocket and killed him with it. Mr. Morris reached the scene of the tragedy late Thursday and has been working on the case ever since. The only clue thus far discovered is that three or four persons saw Pirtle riding along the road in company with a stranger on a big white horse. No one was close enough to identify the man, however, and no trace of him has been found since the killing.
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At the Greater Southwest Historical Museum they have a book for sale, "Indian Territory and Carter County Pioneers 1840-1982. Within this book are stories about James Holmes and Leora (Steed) Akers, Lee Dempsey and Maude (Terry) Akers, and Louis and Bertha Hill Akers. It has two pix of Lee and Maude Akers. You may visit the site of the museum at <----- Click Here
------------------------------------------------------------------------- "Butch, I put Nancy's Hot Roll Dough recipe in my recipe software program and for an average serving of rolls this is what I came out with."
8 cups flour
1-13/16 tsp salt
2/3 cup dry milk powder
2/3 cup shortening
2/3 cup sugar
2-1/2 Tbs yeast
2-1/3 cups water
Don't know how this will taste but I'll try it sometime.
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"Here is the web site that explains about the Buffalo art project. See the "gallery' to see the photos of the brightly painted buffalo." <----- Click Here
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"I recently stumbled upon your website and wanted to take the time to write to you. I was thrilled to see your paragraphs dedicated to my great-grandparents Charles Hobart Heald and Eliza Jane Guy. My father was Charles Farlee Heald, youngest son of Benjamin Carter Heald, who was Charles and Eliza Jane's son. I just returned from a 90th birthday celebration for Benjamin Carter, Jr. held in Lubbock, Texas. My father, Charlie, died July 3, 1998 in Amarillo, Texas. He was a decorated WWII hero and survivor of 42 months as a Japanese POW. He worked on the Bridge over the river Kwai and was ON THE BRIDGE when it was bombed for the last time by U.S. forces. The war ended shortly after that event. I have a number of photos and a great deal of information on the Heald family and can certainly tell you how to get more if there is an interest. Thank you again for showcasing the Heald's." -Serena Heald Holder, Mesa, Arizona
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Hi Butch. The Ardmore High School class of 1954 is having its 50th reunion this October. There are some folks we cannot locate this time around and I'm enclosing their names in the hope that maybe one or more is a T&T reader -- or knows someone who is. We'd love to locate the following people and any help will be appreciated: Any addresses can be sent to Claire Hamilton at joclaire@brightok.net

Geneva Joan Brooks, Jerry Dean Brown, Shirley Wilson Byers, Fred Conway, Flora Mae Holland, Marjorie Valley Jones, Dannie Jo Wilhite Jordan, Jimmy Matlock, Irma Mayfield McCarty, Jerry Hodges Ross, Carolyn Poe Taylor, Bobby Taylor, Shirley Callahan Day, Sybil Fuller Trent
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"Lifeline offers a monthly discount of $8.77 on your local phone service if you participate in food stamps, OK sales tax relief, Medicade, SSI, TANF, Voc Rehab, (including hearing impaired). Federal Public Housing/Sec 8 or LIHEAP. Line connection discounts may also apply. Additional discounts available if you live on tribal lands. Call 1-800-464-7928 for more information, or to sign up." -This was on page 4 of my monthly Southwestern Bell Company phone bill.
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"Terry Dickson who had been featured on the nationally televised "Real Stories of the Highway Patrol" became a local hero here when he was shot by murder fugitive, Michael Whitmill in 1988 during a traffic stop near Ardmore"
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"After the family left Ardmore during our trip back home we also stopped at the cemetery in Davis, Oklahoma to visit our not so talkative relatives who have been laid to rest there. While putting our flowers on the relatives grave-sites I remembered the site of the "unknown" the gentleman who burned to death in his car just off Falls Creek road back in the 50's. Mom would always comment as to why with today's new DNA why someone had never opened the grave to run some DNA tests to see if the gentleman could be identified. She would always say that somewhere there is a family who is wondering whatever happened to their loved one? I always agreed with her. Anyway, we had extra flowers left over (made it a point to do so), and I walked over to the grave-site and put out to flowers. The grave is just inside the east fence of the cemetery on the right as you enter the main entrance - you turn right - count about five or six bushes down and right there is a maker that just reads, "corpse". If anyone knows of a DNA team looking for an interesting project, this one would gel a worthwhile adventure for them."
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"Mr. Bridges, I thought you might like to know since I have tease with you in the past about our dog and the rabbit. Today is a sad day, Hetoe is 20 years old, I had to take him down to be put to sleep. But on a happier note now he can play all he wants to with Frier Rabbit, which his life ended the other day in the road. So the two buddies will be with each other. Hetoe, may have been a very small Wired Terrier, but lay to odds, he was and all the besta' cow herding dog around with pure heart. Hetoe, was a family member that always took care of us. He will be miss. Hetoe now in Doggie Heaven. Where he is happier."
Aug. 10, 1984
Aug. 10, 2004
Frier Rabbit
2003 - 2004
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"Old West history game entertains American troops in Kuwait by Dusty Grothusen, creator of the Old West board game." http://ardmoreite.com/stories/080504/loc_0805040024.shtml
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"Within the last couple of days, the HISTORY channel mentioned Ardmore's infamous railway fire of 1915. The program's theme dealt with the history of hauling hazardous material around the United States and gave specific instances of disasters. They gave a brief summary of the 1915 explosion/fire even detailing the railway worker's involvement with the tank car. I believe it was the following video shown." http://store.aetv.com/html/product/index.jhtml?id=43753
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I want to be a cowboy's sweetheart.
I want to learn to rope and ride.
I want to ride o'er the plains and the deserts
Out West of the Great Di-vide.
I want to hear the coyotes howlin'
While the sun sinks in the West.
I want to be a cowboy's sweet-heart,
That's the life I love the best.

-Patsy Montana 1935

Link to a 30 second music clip of Cowboy's Sweetheart by Patsy Montana. <-------- Click Here

This is the entire song Cowboy's Sweetheart in RealPlayer format. You must have RealPlayer installed on your computer to hear it play. One of the true pioneers of country music was Patsy Montana, the original yodeling cowgirl. She was the first woman in country music to have a million-selling single -- 1935's "I Want to Be a Cowboy's Sweetheart" -- and was a mainstay on WLS Chicago's National Barn Dance for over 25 years. Boy can she yodel! This file takes a few minutes to download, but worth the wait if you have RealPlayer! Cowboy Sweetheart - RealPlayer Format

<----- Patsy Montana Bio

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Saturday August 7, 2004 T&T Weekly - Circulation over 4,000 Vol 8 Issue 381

Former Ardmoreite and now T&T Reader Bill O'Hearn lives in Canada but he emailed me a map of the route taken by trolly car to Lorena Park at Dornick Hills. We have talked about Lorena Park several times over the years. I even remember attending an Emergency Medical Technician Association meeting in Chicago around 1978 and the Executive Director of the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians, Rocco Morando, mentioned the name Lorena Park to me. When he found out I was from Oklahoma, Rocco said as he was a young man in the Army, he came to Ardmore and rode the trolley to Lorena Park as a tourist. Bill O'Hearn has drawn a circle around the area where Lorena Park was located on the map. <----- Click Here

Bill O'Hearn also sent me a scan of an interesting letter dated September 28, 1970 written by Mac MacGalliard. The letter by Mr. MacGalliard was written to a Mr. Allison Chandler of Salina, Kansas. In the letter MacGalliard gives some background history on the trolley cars that took people from downtown Ardmore to Lorena Park. <----- Click Here

Another interesting email this week from a Reader is a Daily Ardmoreite clipping from years ago. The article was written by AHS class of 1954 Dale "Oz" Young of Tulsa. In the clipping Dale talks about his life in Ardmore as a teen, making the drag, the Super Dog, and going to Crisco Beach. Does anyone know where Crisco Beach was located? It seems I remember Cisco Road used to going east from Highway 77 all the way to Lake Murray? <----- Click Here

This is a pic of a 1930 raffle ticket by Ardmore's Coca Cola Bottling Company. They were raffling off a Chevrolet. <----- Click Here

A friend sent in this pic of the train bridge located about 2 miles west of Wetumka, Oklahoma (Hughes County) on Wewoka Creek. This particular photo was taken about April 2004. <----- Click Here

I talked to Nancy Porter this week about reducing the yeast dough mix. She tried halving it once, but the rolls did not turn out ok. I have updated her recipe to make it a little easier to understand but its still for a big bunch of hungry mouths. <----- Click Here

An sad email I received this week: "Butch, I don't know how well you knew Bob Peterson, from Durant, but he died last Friday. Cancer. Had been very ill for a couple of months, was in a nursing home and hospice was called in about a month ago. Just thought I'd let you know. There is a memorial service tomorrow, but I'm not going. I understand the church will be so full I probably won't be able to even get in."

It is always sad when I lose a T&T Reader, especially one who goes back as a friend to almost when I first started my T&T 8 years ago. Bob Peterson of Durant emailed me history tidbits and photos on several occasions, including photos of the now unaccesssible Devils Den north of Tishomingo, Oklahoma. Bob was co-owner of the Durant Daily Democrat newspaper. His "Keeping In Step" column was a staple of life for Durant Daily Democrat readers for 47 years. That must be a near record in this state. I'll miss you Bob. <----- Click Here <----- Click Here <----- Devils Den Pics

A couple of weeks ago a Reader wrote in asking if there was any info on the shooting of Mark Stephens by a peace officer named Guess. The details found through research this week can be found in the Mailbag below.

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Butch love your issues of This & That every week although I live in Johnston County. Remember last year The Teller Cemetery Association sent a booklet on Teller to everyone who sent donations. This year a booklet has been prepared on a pioneer family James M. Russell & Martha Sharp Russell. Mr. Russell was a CSA soldier and a POW, his account of his two years in service is in the booklet, pictures of all Russell headstones and some family members. The address is: Teller Cemetery Association, 3944 W. Golf Course Rd, Tishomingo, Ok 73460 if anyone wants the booklet send donations to above address." -Ruby Beaver, Tishomingo, Ok
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"Butch, My cousin, Minnie Lou Whittington from Grandfield recently sent me a link to find out about CCC workers. She told me I could find the group my Dad worked with thru this link. She was able to locate her Dad's records. Mother told me that she remembered Dad telling her that he helped with the road that circles Mt. Scott. If any of your readers happen to have someone in their family who might have worked on it with him, I would sure like to speak with them. In the meantime, here is the link.......someone may find it as interesting as I did." -Joy Willingham 580-529-3016 purple@sirinet.net <----- Click Here
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"Butch, Smith's Cafe was still the place to run off too in the 70's too. The Cafeteria food was still bad. Lillie Smith's ran the place and she would have our hamburger and fries ready when we got there. Then we would have more time to play pool... You know you had to have your quarters on the table quickly or you would run out of time and not get to play a game for having to go back. Lillie had three grandkids she was raising... Glenn, John and Helen, John was in my class.. The mighty class of 1979. Lillie has been gone for many years now but her granddaughter still lives in her home place which is about a block south of where the Cafe was at (it is a Dollar General now and before that it was a Western store for years.) My father talks about the Longhorn cafe in many of his stories in the Ledger (Memories from the Old Rock Schoolhouse), but I don't remember much about it other than He and mom took me there as a small child. Lone Grove's First Community Bank was built on the spot where it stood. Smith's was the first place I remember mom telling me don't go there at lunch,( too many big kids there) as you can tell I never listen really well back then either. Then we got a pizza place Ranfan's, us younger kids would call from the Risner's Groc next door to the high school and order the student lunch special so it would be ready. We had to hurray because they were located a little be further down the highway to the East. We had to really make time to get there and back before the bell rang. There were as many as 20 or 25 kids there at times. I don't know how they put up with us. If you didn't like those choices for lunch you could always see Mr. Risner's Groc next door or go across the street to Graves Groc for a hand made sandwich to your liking. Now days you go to most stores and they have pre-wrapped sandwiches you microwave. No special service just pick up and go. Grove Mart just North of the High School has now taken over as the place to stop and get great hand made sandwiches... Kenny and Kay Brown take good care of the kids of Lone Grove... it is the place of the 49 cent sodas and the $ 1.75 Bologna and Cheese sandwich. Add a bag of chip and it is lunch for 3 buck or less. The person who wrote about Smith's brought back some good memories..... Those were the days." -JL
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The Wichita Mountains

Beautiful mountains the Wichitas,
Beautiful mountains indeed!
I`m glad you came to share these sights,
of buffalo roaming free,
Of prairee dogs, of giant elk,
of deer and longhorn cattle,
It makes me wish we had a horse
and a week up in the saddle.
Look! Up ahead, buffalo cross the road,
not one bit in a hurry.
They pose for just the perfect shot,
our pictures won`t be blurry,.
There`s bursts of color everywhere,
every color we`ve been told.
The Indian Blankets warm the ground,
with their hues of red and gold.
Mt. Scott invites us up to stop
And gaze out endlessly.
We wind slowly up his narrow roads
Until we reach his peek.
I do! I see forever,
Oh look an eagle flies!
My soul rejoices in the sights
And will be in my dreams tonight.

-Joy C. Willingham
Copyright July 2004
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"There is a great story at Hope that it answers your questions. My brother graduated from St. Gregory's in Shawnee, OK, and I attended Mount St. Scholastica College in Atchison, KS - both were Benedictine schools." -Anna Marie, Lone Grove, Oklahoma <----- Click Here
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"Hi Butch, is there any way for me to find out a time frame for Mr. Hamm recording Dibrell Cemetery near Leon? I could only find nine burials there in his database. In Mr. Hamm's description of the cemetery, he wrote in part, "From a previous survey it is said that the Dibrell cemetery was started beford the Civil War by Ike Cloud.... They say that at one time there were at least a 100 graves in this cemetery, now it is almost completely gone.... "Not sure if it's true, but I read on the net a "local area farmer" stole the headstones. Does anyone know what previous survey he was referring to? I believe my great-grandmother, Eliza Taliaferro dca 1889, may have been buried at Dibrell and don't know what records to try and source. ANY help/advice would be most truly appreciated." vrypubboards@adelphia.net
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"ALRIGHT NOW BUTCH, we all know that at 55 years of age, you're younger than many (or most) of your readers, but if I were you I'd watch my back when I start thinking that "in his '70s" is old. I can remember when as a youngster, many of us thought that our parents in their 30s were old and we couldn't even imagine them knowing as much about life as we did. Age is all relative. My great uncle was in fantastic health and I could hardly keep up with him when he turned 100. His driving scared a lot of us when he was in his 90s because he drove like a race car driver......fast and ducking in and out of traffic as though the other cars were mere obstacles to be dealt with. Many of the readers that I correspond with in this list are in their late 60s, 70s, 80s, and even 90s, and I suspect that very few of them would classify themselves as "dull". After all, computers are not just for the kids anymore (and today's youngsters probably think that at 55 years of age, you're too old to know how to use the keyboard). Incidentally, that great uncle of mine fell and cracked a vertebra at 101; then went to a nursing home and died in his sleep shortly after that. My mom was only 93 when she died of complications from alzheimers and heart problems (also in her sleep). One of my ancestors (at age 100) rode his horse "Sibbie" from his farm in Ohio to Washington, D.C. to demand his pension from military service (and a bayonet wound to the head) in the Revolutionary War. He got it (they thought he was deceased), and the following year he rode that same horse into three states visiting his descendents. When he returned home, his daughter took the horse away from him (much like we take the car-keys away now). He was almost 104 when he died." RoyKendrick@oklahomahistory.net
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"The weekly newspaper that his mother used to purchase might be the Capper' Weekly. I know that my Mother looked forward to receiving her issue and would read it from cover to cover." -Sandra
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"Information in the news letter from Oct./Dec. 1998 mentions someone who had lived in Stonewall Oklahoma for the last 28 years. It called attention to a Erma E, Couch. I am trying to locate my birthplace. It was located a little south and east of Stonewall. I am told a grocery store in the area was owned by A.G. couch. This would be in the late 20's or early 30's. There was also Pleasant Hill school near by, Just taking a chance, may be some connection. If this reaches someone who could help in my search please E-Mail me." bgatewood@webtv.net Betty "Bryant" Gatewood
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"hi Butch... the mention of clara bow brought to mind that i worked with her son, rex bell, in the district attorneys office in las vegas. he is now in private practice,(not doing much of anything) he sat at our table during an awards banquet honoring jack cason, another ardmoreite, into the sports hall of fame... (rex didn't remember me) i was sooo hurt (smile). one other comment and due to age i can't remember what it was. will re-read t and t. hello to ardmore and all the fine people there."
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info on the "castles" at turner falls built by Dr. Ellsworth Collings, Dean of Education at the University of Oklahoma <----- Click Here
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Otey Johnson Estate
The Otey Johnson Estate is also known as Oak Crest. This was the home of Roy Millisander and Odessa (Otey) Johnson. Roy chose this beautiful site for his home in the hills on the outskirts of Ardmore overlooking the Arbuckle Mountains to the North and Ardmore to the South. The home was completed in 1917. The costs of the home were $250,000 which was a staggering sum in 1917. Roy Johnson was an independent oil producer, local philanthropist and newspaper publisher. Mr. Johnson intended for this home to be a "fortress" for his wife, although Odessa was terrified of Oklahoma storms. Oak Crest was exceptionally well constructed, exhibiting excellent craftsmanship that has endured despite long periods of non-occupancy. The home can be easily identified by its Spanish red clay tile roof and terra cotta balustrade surrounding the front terrace. The home has architectural styles of both the Italian Renaissance and a Spanish Villa. This home features construction of massive blue and gray granite blocks which were transported by mule drawn wagons from a quarry near Tishomingo, OK. The house is structurally supported by cast concrete walls, ceiling, roof deck and some flooring. The home contained four bedrooms. The interior was typical of the trend away from lavish Victorian era, so was rather very simple, though there was luxurious features, including fireplaces in the living room, glassed in porch and library, fountains in both tiled flower room and the courtyard, cedar closets in all bedrooms and chilled water outlets above each lavatory. The home was lit by ornate handmade light fixtures of leaded glass and copper. A carriage house designed for house servants is sited East of the main house. A small log cabin sits to the East also, built as a gift from Roy Johnson to his young son Otey. The ownership of Oak Crest was later passed on to their son, Dr. Otey Johnson and subsequently to the Ardmore Institute of Health. The institute has since restored the home in memory and a tribute to Roy M. Johnson.
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"I am trying to locate some old photographs of the original Whittington Hotel that was destroyed in the fire of 1895. I received pictures of the pre-1915 explosion hotel, but no one seems to be able to help me on pre-1895. If anyone knows where I may be able to find such a photograph or two, please contact me. My husband and I are attempting to gather photos of the downtown area from before the fire, and perhaps write a history of the city. Any help you could give us would be appreciated."
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"Dear Butch, My name is Ken Patrick, I live in Great Bend Kansas. I'm doing geneological research on my Akers family roots. I recently read an article on James Holmes Akers, first sheriff of Carter County in your newsletter. I gleaned a lot of information from it and I thank you for putting it on the web. I am doing research on one of James Holmes Akers, brothers who is a distant relative of mine. His name was John Dempsey Akers and he along with two other brothers of James Holmes Akers ran a grocery store business in Woodford Oklahoma. John Demsey Akers wife Jackie Ann, mentioned in your article, raised my mother, Irma Jacqueline and her sister and brother, when their parents died of tuberculosis when she was 6 years old in the early 1930's. That saved them from being put in an orphanage by the rest of the family. I have tried all kinds of routes on the internet rootsweb, ancestry.com trying to get more information on my mothers people the Akers of that area. John Dempsey Akers also had a son named JD Akers who had another son named JD Akers who was my mothers father who died when she was six years old. You mentioned this information I saw came from "1983 Indian Territory and Carter County Pioneer book.. Maybe there's more information that would help me. How do I get a copy of it or other geneological records of that area and name to help me. I'd like to know who the first JD Akers and James Holmes Akers father was and where they came from. I have a listing of carter county cemetary at Woodford from Bill Hamms records on the web...most of the Akers Im talking about are buried there... If you would know of any sources I could contact regarding any info that would help me put some dates and people together I would appreciate anything you could do. Thank You for your time." -Ken Patrick 1300 Eisenhower, Great Bend, Kansas 67530 Ph. 620-792-7190 kpatrick57@sbcglobal.net <----- Click Here
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pioneer papers on Turner Falls history
<----- Click Here
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"When looking for yet more free spyware, I came upon your link. I'm a fellow Okie and am having a heck of a time with Spyware/browser hijackers. I have installed,as an anti virus, AVG and am pleased with that aspect. I currently have installed Spybot S&D and Adaware. Recently, I also installed Spyware Blaster, which although it doesn't get rid of what you have already, it will block anything else. NOTHING is working! It seems to be getting worse, as in I can't type in an address in the address bar now without it getting hijacked.....resets to about:blank and then runs a little thing down that tells me I have spyware and should click on this button for help....hmmmm. ANY help would be appreciated!" <----- Click Here
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The Davis News July 20, 1911
Roff Officers Have Fatal Fight
Ada, OK--July 17, Oscar Collins, deputy sheriff of Roff, fifteen miles from here, is dead, and Pete Beauchamp will die as a result of a gunfight between the two men in the Bass hardware store at 6 o'clock Monday evening at Roff. Beauchamp is the city marshal of Roff. The fight was supposed to have occurred over the purchase of a pair of horses for the fire department. Beauchamp is said to have fired first. He fired three times in all using a revolver. Collins fired only once with a shotgun which took effect.
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The Daily Ardmoreite December 22, 1911
SHERIFF RESTORES STOLEN BICYCLE
About three weeks ago a bicycle was stolen from the front porch of C.H. Brown's residence and Sheriff Garrett was not notified of the fact until two days ago. He began work in his own peculiar way and this morning delivered the wheel back to its owner. The wheel was found at a residence on West Main street, where it was taken by a youth who lives there with his parents and from all appearances was given hard usage as it was practically new when stolen but is now in very bad shape. It doesn't seem to make much difference to Buck whether it is a horse thief, or a bicycle thief, a safe cracker or a second-story worker, he lands them all.

RECOVERS GUN AFTER THREE YEARS
Today must have been Buck Garrett's day for catching thieves. He began early this morning and to noon had apprehended two, and is working on another that will be landed if he don't watch out. The first thing he did was recover a bicycle and then next, was to land a thief that has had in his possession for over three years a gun belonging to S.S. Tolson. About three years ago S.S. Tolson loaned a valuable ladies' shotgun to J.E. Hamilton the shoe man. After a few days the gun mysteriously disappeared and no trace of it was found until a few days ago. Very little was said about the matter at the time, but a few days ago the gun was brought to the repair shop of Ritter & Son, to be repaired, and there Mr. Tolson in passing chanced to see Mr. Ritter at work on it and identified it as his. Mr. Ritter stated that a black man had brought the gun there to be repaired, but could give no accurate description of him, and could only describe him in a general way. From this clue, Buck went to work this morning and soon had under arrest Jesse Prater, a waiter in a local boarding house. It was not before Jesse acknowledged the fact and now he will have a tale to tell before his honor next.
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PREPARING TO SET OUT MANY TREES December 26, 1911
There is a campaign about to be inaugurated in this city by the property owners, who are determined to make the city beautiful. Trees planted three years ago on property that was not so very desirable has enhanced the value of that property more than three fold and the owners of the desirable lots who have them on the market realize that a row of trees add as much to the value of a lot as does a cottage. The best varieties to set out in this vicinity is the water elm and the maple and there will be a good business done to those varieties here the coming spring. The maple is the most rapid grower but the elm attains gigantic proportions and is the most majestic tree in the world. A row will be planted around the new court house in the spring.
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HOW ABOUT OUR FEDERAL BUILDING December 28, 1911
Through the efforts of Congressman Carter, aided and abetted by Senator Thomas Pryor Gore, an appropriation was obtained for a federal building to be erected in Ardmore at a cost of something like $200,000, stipulating that a suitable site could be obtained. The citizens of the city got busy when the good news was brought to them and ere long the site of the old Chickasaw Lumber Company's yard at the corner of Washington street and Broadway was secured. Work was begun demolishing the buildings in anticipation of early work on the new federal building, but as yet there has not been a ripple. The people are beginning to wonder when work will begin on this new building. At present the lot resembles a miniature frog farm and is being used when possible as a hitching ground for farmers' teams. It is hoped by many citizens that the chief draftsman of the department will get to the plans for the building at the earliest possible moment and give us a building that will add to our civic attractiveness.
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Ada Evening News November 22, 1912
A railroad contractor recently advertised for three hundred wooden sleepers. By return post he received a letter from a neighboring clergy-man offering him the whole of his congregation.

Adv--TRAVELERS HOTEL CAFE
Drop in today and enjoy a meal prepared by a chef who understands the Culinary Art from A to Izzard. Meals, de Luxe 25 cents. C.O. Bennett, Prop.
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Wichita Daily Times November 28, 1923
Sterling Silver Thimbles special 25 cents each Krugers Jewelry Company Eighth and Indiana
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The Davis News
March 6, 1924
Hennepin Citizen Receives Threatening Letter The letter received by Mr. Perkins of Hennepin and forwarded to us for publication follows:
Mr. George Perkins At home. Say let that school petucion out or some more of your stuff will go up in smoke it may be your barn or your house are both. Don't turn it to Hennepin. Tare that petucion up are we will do the work. KKK

Dear Mr. Editor, I have been circulating a petition for a union graded school composed of Homer, Hennepin, and Woodland districts, said school to be located centrally. This very malignant letter appeared mysteriously in my mail box. Geo. Perkins (Mr. Perkins does not think the letter was from the Klan)
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The Daily Ardmoreite
June 14, 1926
Twenty years ago
June 14, 1906 went down in American history as the day when congress granted statehood to Oklahoma and Indian Territory. News of the senate's action was received by deafening cheers from both sides of the house. It was the end of a six year bitter fight and an attempt to inject sectionalism in the discussion was promptly and vigorously called down.

R.W. Randol, Lee Cruce, and W.S. Wolverton were appointed as a special committee to act in raising funds sufficient to enlarge the dormitories and improve Hargrove college.
Thirty years ago
Judge Hobby's court was the center of attraction, the case of Receiver Bruce against about 100 citizens of north Ardmore being the prompting cause. Thomas Gladney and also A.B. Roff were shipping a total seven train car loads of fat steers to Chicago.
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June 2, 1954--Rambling Reporter
Sam Coe and Isaac Larue were teaching Beverly Lane and Maryanne Parker the fine points of swimming and diving. Employee of the pool, Mattie Berryhill, is very helpful when Bill bought candy, she sampled it just to make sure Bill wouldn't be poisoned. Others mentioned that were at the Kiwanis pool today also included: Raymond and Bessie Childress, and son Tommy; Mary Lou Scott, Sylvia Paschall, Dianna Schaub, Ava Ricketts; and Bob Williams, daughter Jeannette, and son Ave Jr., Lynda Byrd, Judy Douglas, Judy Lewis, Linda Harrell, Amanda Hardy, Jackie Drennan, Charles Davenport, Clifford Davis, Buddy Smith, Jimmy Baxter, and Laurell and Harrie Fay Tharp. Also, Kathryn Cornish, and daughters Connie and Kim, and cousins Sonny and Metha Epley. Bill Tapp, a husky young man was the hero of the swimming pool. Mrs. Ray Reddin drove her car up to the iron rail around the pool a bit too fast and the bumper caught under the rail, she was unable to back it out. Bill pried it loose with a board. Mrs. Reddin's daughter, Marsha, enlivened the proceedings by honking the horn will all her might.

Edith (Mrs W.L.) Winston of Ardmore, along with the missus, were representing the Winston family at McMillan. Mr. Winston before his death 7 years previous had been in business at McMillan for more than 50 years. Others mentioned at the McMillan gathering were: Woody Scott, his son, Larry, his sister, Mrs. Ed Hepps, along with Milton and Ralph Scott; Mrs. James (Carrie) Pennell and daughters, Vela and Barbara; Port Williams, Argra Bright, Blande Byrne, Jess Bean, Harold Jackson, and Edith and Sara Greer.
------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Davis News November 29, 1923
Mart (sic) Stephens Killed by Dougherty Officer
W.E. (Slim) Guess, city marshal and constable of Dougherty, shot and killed Mart (sic) Stephens, son of Jno. E. Stephens, last Saturday night, about 10:30 o'clock. The tragedy occurred a mile and a half west of Dougherty at the home of Shorty Blumley, where a dance was being held.

According to officer's statement, Stephens was drunk and disorderly at the dance and when he undertook to take him outside the house, Guess had to hit him over the head with his gun, and in the scuffle that ensued, the gun went off accidentally. The weapon was an automatic pistol and the bullet entered the temple and penetrated the brain.

Both men had families. Guess went at once to Sulphur and gave up. His examining trial will be held Saturday. Stephens was buried in Dougherty Monday afternoon, Rev. T.H. Carden of this city conducting the funeral service.
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In Memororian
Mark, 25 year old son of John E. Stephens, and wife of Dougherty was shot and killed November 24th, two miles west of town. Mark was born January 29, 1898, at Dougherty, and was married to Ethel Parish, October 29, 1910 and to this union three children were born, the oldest being five years old. Mark was a good boy. He had lots of friends. He leaves a mother, father, wife and three children, one brother and four sisters and a host of friends. Let our hearts go out in sympathy to his loved ones and friends in sorrow.

"Death our dearest ties can sever
Take our loved ones from our side
O'er the dark cold water a tide
In that happy land we'll meet them
With those loved ones gone before
And again with joy we'll greet them
There where parting is no more."

-a Friend
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December 13, 1923
Guess Released on Bond
Slim Guess, Dougherty peace officer, charged with the recent killing of Mark Stephens, was admitted to bond on habens corpus hearing Friday night at Pauls Valley, before District Judge A.C. Barrett. His bond was set at $20,000, which he made and was released Saturday night. The bond was signed by about fifteen prominent citizens of the county and its value is easily estimated at $300,000
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January 10, 1924
Mr. Slim Guess was in Sulphur Saturday on business.
------------------------------------------------------------------------- "The one photograph of a store front is probably of Porter Staples the "red headed grocer" with the slab of meat over his shoulder. This is probably one of the earliest photographs of Ardmore grocers and has a telephone number on the wagon that may date it to a certain era." -Robert W. Hunnicutt, Vail, AZ <----- Click Here
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"Maybe you can help me with this. In Lamar, Oklahoma at Jody's restaurant, there is an article on the wall about a vaseline mine. It no longer exists but did and is the only one known of in the world. do you have any information on this? The story, so i've heard, when it comes out of the ground its green. people used it for greasing hubs on wagons. see what you can find out for me please."
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"Good morning Butch. Have been asked when OHP Terry Dickson was shot, but don't remember. Do you or any of your Readers happen to know the date Terry was shot? Thanks."
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"When I find myself fading, I close my eyes and realize my friends are my energy." -Anon.

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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