"This & That" News - Oct, Nov, Dec 2003

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Below is October 4, 2003 to December 27, 2003.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Saturday December 27, 2003 T&T Weekly Vol 7 Issue 349

Some of you will remember that last month (November 13th) the historic George Washington Inaugural Bible was on display at the Southern Oklahoma Museum of History. The bible was printed in London in 1767. Jonathan Hampton was sworn in using this bible as the Master of the oldest Masonic Lodge in New York on Number 28, 1770. On April 30, 1789 George Washington was sworn in using this same bible. He put his right hand on the 49th and 50th chapter of Genesis. When the oath was completed, President Washington added the phrase, "I swear, so help me God", and bending forward, kissed the open book. Here are some photographs a T&T Reader took of this famous piece of U.S. history. Here are a couple of those pics when it was on display in Ardmore last month. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/GeorgeWashingtonBible03a.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/GeorgeWashingtonBible03b.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/GeorgeWashingtonBible03c.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/GeorgeWashingtonBible03d.jpg

Back around 1970 and the years before in the southeast of corner of 12th and North Commerce stood the English Village. It was a site of small economy cottages that could be rented by the day or week. I remember Mrs Evelyn Potts (1905-1994) working the old telephone switchboard in the motel's office. I'm not sure exactly how many years Mrs Potts answered the phones for English Village, but it was over 20 years. She was quite a character in her own way and very interesting to talk to. She lived at Springdale Road and "P" Street SE when she was alive. When I did refrigeration work in the 70s I worked on many of the English Villages room air conditioners. Mrs. Potts always had a story to tell. I wish she was still here, I'd pick her brain. The English Village occupied the land where the present day Citizens National Bank is located http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/englishvillage3.jpg

I was traveling through Wynnewood, Oklahoma Christmas Day and decided to look around a minute. I went one block north of the only traffic light in Wynnewood, down the old red brick street, and there next to the Wynnewood lumber yard was an old ATSF mail cart! It looks like its all there, and I bet someday someone will get their hands on this piece of railway history, restores it, and sells it for a pretty penny. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/WynnewoodMailCart03.jpg

A Reader in Arkansas sent me a page out of the 1944 Ardmore phone book. The page she scanned was the "B"s (and some "C"s) where the Bridges' are listed. I see a lot of names I recognize, like Betty Brown, Charles Buckholtz, Harlan Boyd, Dr. J.J Boyd, Virginia Fraley Boyd, Thelma Boyd, Bob Bullock's Grill, Charles H. Brewer, Jack Brewster, (Judge) Earl O. Brown, Cecil Baber, Joel Bettes, Calvary Presbyterian Church on 3rd NE, and the Boy Scout Headquarters at 17 1/2 North Washington, any many more. But what I need is some of you "oldtimers" tell us the meaning of the strange phone numbers some people have.... like 9511-F-22 for C.D. Bostwick, or 1739-J for John Boucher. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/1944phonebookb.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/1944phonebookbb.jpg 

Speaking of churches, here is a photo of Ardmore's Methodist Church before statehood. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/MethodistArdmore.jpg 

I received a nice email this week from the son of slain Ardmore Police detective Buddy Moorhead this week, Jack Moorhead of California. Jack was seeking any info on his dad's death at the hands of Pat O'Day in 1931 on the northeast edge of Ardmore. This is a photo of Buddy Moorhead. http://www.brightok.net/cartercounty/photos/moorhead.jpg 

Here is the email Jack sent me this week: "A cousin of mine has given this address to me regarding information about Ardmore, OK. I was born and raised in Ardmore but have been living in California for the past 45 years or so. My cousin is Bill Garrison and I am now in touch with him as to the history of our family. He mentioned reading something from your newsletter about my father who was a policeman, killed on duty back in 1931 when I was an infant (15 months old). I left Ardmore in 1955 returned to OU where I graduated in 1957 with a degree in Journalism, worked at various newspapers in northern California and retired in 1994 after 19 years as editor and publisher of a 6-daily newspaper. Any information on your newsletter would be appreciated. Thank you very much." -Jack Moorhead

It is a shame Buddy Moorhead's name is misspelled on the slain officers memorial in front the sheriffs office. The monument was dedicated in May 1996 and several months prior I was asked for any info I had on all the slain officers of this county including Buddy Moorhead's. For reasons unknown to me, it was decided to change the name to Moorehead. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/CarterCountyOfficersMemorial03.jpg 

The link below is the story of the 1931 Moorhead murder. http://www.brightok.net/cartercounty/moorhead.html 

Recorded by Betty Carroll October 23, 1984: "Once upon a time.... "prior to statehood Oklahoma was the Indian Territory with the five civilized tribes, the Creeks, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Cherokees, and Seminoles having their separate nations here. Among the first pioneers in the area were the soldiers. Zachary Taylor, Jefferson Davis, and Robert E. Lee were among the officers of Oklahoma forts. Old Ft Washita is a 115 acre historical site where you step back into the southern Oklahoma of around 100 years ago. You will see partly restored ruins of native stone buildings. The ancient Pawnee Indian trail comes into the fort from the east. Confederate troops held the fort through much of the Civil War. But the federal soldiers built and occupied the fort from about 1847 until the early years of the Civil War. There are cemeteries on all sides and two generals were buried there. We wonder what dramatic happenings were experienced by the frontier soldiers and their families."

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Butch, about WAGON WHEEL CAVE at Turner Falls.... the one in the photo is known as CRYSTAL CAVE, located about 1/2 mile behind the current bathhouse. Wagon Wheel cave is the cave that is right next to the falls that is seen in all the photos. Outlaw cave is located on the same side, ontop of the falls about 75 yards back. One of the most overlooked features in TURNER FALLS is the "Woman of the Rock" which can be seen from the castle looking up to the overlook. It is a profile of a woman's face. It used to be on the brochures listed as one of the attractions but later was dropped for some reason. Just thought I'd help clarify the Cave Names." -Bryan Pullen, Davis, Oklahoma, '32 year Turner Falls Veteran' http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/CrystalCave.jpg
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"Will attempt to clear up misconception about the Wagon Wheel, Crystal Cave, and the cave to the immediate upper right of the Falls. Of course, I stand to be corrected re: the Wagon Wheel, but those who described it as about 200 yds. up the canyon floor & high up the wall to the left, or northeast, and difficult to enter, is, as I too remember. A very shallow cave... Crystal cave is another couple of hundred yds. east, and it too is on the left, or east side of the canyon but, only slightly elevated above the canyon floor with a large rock almost covering the entrance. Hope this clarifies to some degree, as I journeyed to these caves many times as a teenager. There is rumored to be another much larger cave several miles up the source of Honey creek. At one time is was called Bitter Enders cave. Don't know the source of the name."
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"It looks like we have more in common than we might have thought... a love of history. I've got a website on the history of Dublin, Ireland - though not quite as fancy as your own. On top of that - I live in Ardmore estate, Dublin." http://indigo.ie/~kfinlay/
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"Hi Butch. I enjoy reading your This and That newsletter. I'm looking for any kind of information about the history of the Tabletop Mountains area in Garvin County, between Lindsay and Elmore City and the Foster area. Thanks and keep up the good work." -Judy Bowman, Tabletop Homestead. Foster, OK. http://home.earthlink.net/~tabletophomestead
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"Hello Butch. I grew up on a farm in the "Greasy Bend" area North of Mannsville, it was a real treat for us in the summer to go to the "picture show", my dad would back the pick-up in next to the speaker pole and we would sit in the back on quilts under the stars and watch such new releases as "Shane" and "The Man From Laramie" ahhh those were real movies! Also I read in this weeks T&T about Kitty Wells singing across the street in the "little beer joint", I wonder it that reference was to the "Club Willow", I also recall large traffic jams when well known stars such as Kitty, and Hank Thompson, Ray Price and some of the other Honky Tonk artists of the day were in town.We being t-totalers and Baptists we also called it a "beer joint" I think the word "club" in the name was supposed to give it respectability. well anyway I remember when the "willow tree" burned down that was the end of an era also. On another note a while back I saw an old familiar name appear in the T&T, that of Harlton "Red" Gaines, I worked with him at Colvert Dairy in the late 60s, I was a new transport truck driver and sometimes I rode with him on his transport route, I have very good memories of him, he sometimes had to "re-back" my tractor-trailer rig up to the dock so he could get his in but he never chewed on me just kidded me about my backing prowess God bless that kind man. anyway thanks for the memories." -Roy Barnes, Purcell Oklahoma
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"Hi Butch, As usual, great job. Sylvia Moore wrote about the puppet display at Daubes, I haven't seen it, but understand that very display is now at the Historical Museum in Ardmore. I remember it well, we came from Milburn to see it when it was at Daubes. Also, the Christmas display at Wilson, Oklahoma was by Bea and Bo Ward. Wonderful people. Keep up the good work, and Merry Christmas." -Jerry Landrum http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/DaubePuppets2.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/DaubePuppets3.jpg
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"I would be interested in seeing a photo of the Carter Ave. Methodist Church also. I went there during the 'thirties with my grandparents, Harriet and Lucian Jones, who lived in the 800 block on Carter Ave., across from the Ringer house. My grandparents took me to church to "see Santa Claus" at the Christmas program. I was given a red net "stocking" with some nuts, an orange and some of that colored hard candy that came in swirls. As a little kid, I thought it was the world's greatest because it was so pretty." -Carolyn Frei, Idaho
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"Butch I am familiar with drive inn theater locations, here is what my wife and I remember about the locations. At the corner of old hwy 77 and 4th NW there was a Gulf Station called the Tower Gulf or 'little gulf' and it is located on the corner where the bank is now, the Tower Restaurant and Tower Motel were south of the station. This was all located on the SW corner of that intersection (it is now SW corner of Grand and Commerce). The Tower Drive-In Theater was located 200 or 300 feet west of that same intersection across open field on north side. We believe the drive-in was named from the corner businesses. Later in the early 50's a housing development was built. The Starlite Drive-In theater was located across from the Hilltop Cafe also there was a skating rink in that area in the early 50's, it had a wood floor, 4 foot wall around sides with screen wire for bug deterrent and a cloth top with sides that let down. Some of the details may be vague but that is the way we remember it."
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"hi butch, does anyone know the people from ardmore ok, they was in my bixler family info. thank you." pam potter LEONIA12 BIXLER (PHILIP SHERIDAN11, LEVI10, GEORGE9, JOHN8, JOHN7, JOHN HANS6, ULRICH5 BICHSEL, JOHANNES HANS4, ULRICH3, HANS2, HANS1) was born February 02, 1899 in Caton, Will, Illinois, and died January 01, 1990. She married (1) EDGAR W FULLINGINS. He was born Abt. 1895 in of Caton, Will, Illinois, and died Unknown. She married (2) EDGAR FULLINGIM Abt. 1921. He was born Abt. 1896 in Ardmore, Oklahoma, and died Unknown.
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"i was sent this information by a cousin of mine in california. i am trying to trace the wynn family. my grandfather was willie walton wynn and lived in healdton, ok for as long as i remember. he was born 4-16-1878 in desdemona, eastland county, texas. married frances lanora fairchild on jan. 8, 1899 and at the time says both from troy, oklahoma. my father was b. b. wynn born oct 1, 1908 in troy ok. i am trying to find out about this family. i believe willie walton's father was j. wynn as he was a justice of peace in desdemona, eastland co, texas and the town was named after my grandfathers sister. possible his name was judge j. w. wynn. not sure on the w but he married elizabeth knight. have no dates. would love to have your newsletter sent to me and maybe something will be about this wynn name. i have hit a brick wall. if you know anyone that knows about the wynn family please have them contact me. please have them put wynn in subject line so i will be sure and open it up. hope you have a merry christmas." -norene wynn gravley. wynbag@aol.com
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"Merry Christmas, Butch! My cousin, Don Wells, along with Toby Kell and Bill Wallace, were bell ringers for the Presbyterian church during their high school years. There may have been others who served as ringers, but those are the only ones I know. Don passed away a few years ago, and I don't know where the other two men now live. It would be nice if they could be the first to ring the bells when they are returned to Ardmore."
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"My father and grandfather ran Heartsill's Grocery and Market at 412 C SW until the mid-fifties." -Gary Heartsill
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"Butch, I've been playing with panoramic photos and have attached a couple. One is of the old ONMP Railroad Bridge (best known as the Ringling Line) that still spans the Bayou between Lone Grove and Wilson, Okla. There are date nails in the supporting timbers showing it was constructed in 1929. The Railroad abandoned the bridge in about 1976 but it's now used as a lease road. The photo of the low water crossing is on what I believe is now called Buck Skin Rd. Also between Lone Grove and Wilson. They have changed all the section line road names and it's hard for me to keep up with them. The pano view of the railroad bridge is made up of four overlapping photos and stitched together with software. The low water photo consists of two photos stitched together. Lot's of fun. Your viewers might want to try it. Some of the new digital cameras come packaged with stitch software. Or you can buy the software separately as I did. These pano shots were made with "Aftershot" by JASC software. Very easy providing you overlap the shots and keep them all level & in line. Best results are with a tripod but it will work with hand held shots as well." -C. Dwane Stevens http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/ONMPBridgePano122203.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/BayouCrossingBuckSkinRdPano122203.jpg
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"Hi Butch! One of my relatives would like to have a picture of the Super Dog Drive In that was on the old highway 77 that is now Commerce. Maybe you or one of your many fans could help out."
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"I am seeking ghost stories and urban legends in the Eufaula area. Any information sent will be confidential unless I am told otherwise. Please contact me at Caitorrie@hotmail.com - subject line "Ghost stories"."
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ConnectOklahoma. "From Perry, Oklahoma: The Cherokee Strip Land Run of September,1893 took place after a long hot summer and there was so much dust lingering in the air that (because of the scarcity of available water) a new saloon brought in wagon loads of beer and sold 38,000 bottles of beer at $1 a bottle the day after the run. Then they dropped the price to 50 cents and kept on selling. There weren't many small trees around that year so most folks decorated tumbleweeds for Christmas at first. These facts are in our history books. It's interesting to note that Vera Jones, Jr. kamieljones@webtv.net remembers her momma telling of using a tumbleweed the same way. I guess it must have been universal in those days, even in an area like Ardmore in which there were probably all sorts of small evergreen trees that were free for the cutting. We have a Christmas tree farm just east of Perry, Ok. that does a good business this time of year, but isn't it interesting that so many folks use artificial trees year after year. I used the aluminum trees for years (wish I still had one or two) but for the last several years, have been using one made of pine cones and spray-painted a powder-blue color (the cones are glued together to form a cone-shaped tree) and then it's permanently lighted by a string of miniature blue lights and tiny mirrors glued to the cones themselves. I just got it out of storage a few weeks ago, dusted it off with a soft paint brush, put it in a window and plugged it in again. Of course I also decorated an outdoor tree with miniature lights too and added some strings of "twinkle" lights plus some of the icicle lights. In our city (Perry, Oklahoma) the city gives us a rebate on our (February) electric bill if we sign up for a lighted Christmas display and then a local bank (or other merchants) present cash prizes for the three best displays (separate prizes for businesses and for individual homes) as chosen by a local committee. We also have a Christmas parade of homes with local families opening up their homes on a particular day to show their family-heritage decorations. Each of these homes has a decorative theme that's chosen by the owners; and the chamber of commerce sells tickets and provides maps to show which homes are participating. Again, cash prizes are awarded to participants in this local event. I imagine that several communities have similar traditions." -Roy Kendrick RoyKendrick@oklahomahistory.net
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"Latest update on Jack Rabbit... Frier Rabbit our local cotton tail says, "I sent those Jack Rabbits packin', to Ardmore, but I guess they hop on to Texas." Now Frier Rabbit is one big cotton tail and his best friend is our old dog of 17 years. It is really funny when Frier is chasing Hetoe. Just wanted to wish ya a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year." kamieljones@webtv.net
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"Does anyone have anything on the history of the Marietta national bank that was in Marietta, Oklahoma?" -Linda Kerr
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"It was a normal day (April 12, 2002) in Sharon Springs, Kansas when a Union Pacific crew boarded a loaded coal train for the long trek back to Salina. Just a few kilometers into the trip, a wheel bearing became overheated and melted off letting the truck support drop down and grind on top of the rail creating white hot molten metal droppings that spewed down onto the rails. The GOOD NEWS to this is that a very alert crew noticed a small amount of smoke halfway back in the train and immediately stopped the train in compliance with the rules. The BAD NEWS to this is that the train just happened to stop with its hot wheels on top of a wooden trestle bridge built with creosote ties, bents and trusses. The bridge was rebuilt in 5 days." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/SharonSpringsKSa.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/SharonSpringsKSb.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/SharonSpringsKSc.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/SharonSpringsKSd.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/SharonSpringsKSe.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/SharonSpringsKSf.jpg
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"Today is Friday, Dec. 26. This morning Oklahoma Highway Patrol Officer Nic Green was killed in the line of duty near Devol, Oklahoma (Cotton county). He was a very well respected man in our community and everyone knew him. He will be missed dearly. He was a good father. He was a friend of Billy Don's and his wife helped me tremendously while I did my student teaching in Randlett. You can keep up on the updates by logging on to Please pray for his family to get through this difficult time. He has a wife and three young daughters. Thanks for your prayers." -Dina
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The Sheriffs Office won the Christmas Tree contest for 2003. They had 42% of the votes, with the Mapping Dept on the fourth floor coming in 2nd with 15% and third was the Commissioners office with 9% of the votes. http://vote.sparklit.com/poll.spark/800486

In a few days 2003 will come to a close. I am thankful several thousand of us could all meet here every weekend from all across the country, and look forward to many more T&T gatherings in 2004. The history we can share is endless, and we are doing it in an unprecedented way. There were some who started this year with us, but did not finish it because of a higher calling. But the history they shared will be recorded here for future generations for as long as the world turns. I appreciate everyone of you, you are all like family to me. Lets put this year behind us at midnight on December 31st, and look forward to the new one together. Whatever the new year brings, lets face it united.

"We meet today,
To thank Thee for the era done,
And Thee for the opening one."
-John Greenleaf Whittier 1807-1892
http://users.erols.com/kfraser/authors/whittier.html

See everyone next year!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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Saturday December 20, 2003 T&T Weekly Vol 7 Issue 348

This week I received an interesting phone call from a Reader with maybe some insight into those Indian statues that Wirt Franklin (Franklin Palacine Oil and Gas/Franklin Refinery) had at his filling station on D SW and several other places including the curio shop-lookout point at Turner Falls. These statues existed in the 30s and 40s around southern Oklahoma. This caller said a man lived next door to him when he moved there named Eubanks. Mr. Eubanks worked for Wirt Franklin, and around 1952 Wirt told him to "get rid of all those statues". Not knowing exacting what to do with them, Eubanks brought them out to his property southwest of Ardmore on Hedges Road, threw them in a ditch beside the his house, and buried them, all 15 of them.

I've talked to the son of the property owner, and he knows exactly what ditch Eurbanks referred to, and its now filled in, grass growing over it today. I wish we could go out there with metal detectors and do some searching, but there is a lot of other metal buried there, including sheet iron, barb wire, old refrigerators, etc. So it would be nearly impossible to find any thing left of the Indian statues. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/palacinestation.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/TurnerFallsIndian3a.jpg 

Last week I talked about the work being done by a company overseas to re-tune the bells at First Presbyterian Church. Ardmoreite Bill Lumpkin and his architectural background was instrumental in making sure those historic bells were properly packed in crates so they could make that ocean trip safely. Bill sent me an email with pictures of the company in The Netherlands who are doing the work, pictures of the workers using their skills at the bell factory during different stages of the work. Its sure going to be nice to hear those bells again, tolling their sounds across downtown Ardmore! We always knew when it was 5pm and quitting time, we could heard the bells playing a First Presbyterian! Hopefully next Spring we'll hear them again! http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/PresbyBells03b.jpg

We've talked about Hattye Hinkle and her family the past few weeks, and that the street on the north side of the courthouse is named after the Hinkle family. This week I was walking down to Stolfa Hardware on East Main street and glancing down at the brick sidewalk, I noticed a brick paver with Hinkle on it. I stopped and low and below there was Judge John Hinkle's name on one! The brick just below his was engraved with his son's name, John Homer Hinkle. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/HinkleBricks.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bringhattyehome.html 

We have a new addition to the Carter County courthouse family. Erica Gay, director of the CASA office on the fourth floor, has a new baby girl! Santa made an early trip to Ardmore December 1st with this bundle of joy to delivery Jacelyn so Erica and Chuck would have her in time for Christmas! They really have something to smile about this Christmas Season. If you want to send a congrats to Erica and Chuck, email: casa_child@yahoo.com

Here's a pic of Erica and little Jacelyn..... http://www.brightok.net/cartercounty/CourtAppointedSpecialAdvocate.html 

Last week I had a picture of my great grandmother Ida Murphree Miller who lived across the street east from the old Washington School. While I was in Stolfa Hardware Store there hanging from the wall was a couple of 4 inch diameter water well buckets, the kind with the pull trigger at the top. Ida Miller had a well behind her house and I remember it having these same kind of water well buckets. I loved to lower the rope and bucket down the well casing, pull it up, then pull the trigger and let the water run out the bottom. What memories! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/wellbucket3a.jpg

This is a closeup to the trigger at the top of the tube that is pulled to release the water. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/wellbucket3b.jpg

Mrs Wilson in Lone Grove sent a photo her son Billy took over in Ringling this week. Its a bell mounted in front of a resident in Ringling. I sure need to make a trip to far NE Oklahoma and find some bells in those four or 5 counties there I lack bell pics. But then they maybe that will be a Spring project, when the grass is green and the smell of pine trees is in the air as it drifts across those rolling hills of eastern Oklahoma. Anyway, here is a pic of that bell in Ringling. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/ringlingbell03.jpg

CABINET PHOTOS - Cabinet photos came into being after the Civil War and remained popular until about 1900. Measuring approximately 4.5" x 6.5", they were larger than previous formats which made them easier to enjoy. The larger format also opened up new creative opportunities for the photographs. Early cabinets were mounted on fairly plain cards, but by the 1880's the cards had become more decorative. The later cards often had fancy advertising for the photographer on the back. This is a cabinet photo by Webb Studios of Ardmore from my family's photos. Its a photograph of my aunt Marie Carmon Pruitt taken back in the 1920s. She was my mother's sister and lived next door to me for over 20 years before she passed away last February 27th at 91 years old. Marie was a little eccentric, but I loved her, and I sure miss that lady and her eccentric ways. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/MarieCarmonPruitt.jpg  http://ardmoreite.com/stories/022803/obi_pruiit.shtml 

This week I had OGE out to my house to fix a problem with the electricity coming into my house. It was even causing a problem with the DVD burning, so I was sure glad they came right out and fixed the problem immediately. And to show these guys go the extra mile, and come though when you need them, they came to the courthouse this week for a little public service. The rope on the flag pole broke in high winds a couple of weeks ago and they used their bucket truck to reach up and put a new rope through the pulley at the top of that 60 foot flag pole. Great work guys, its really appreciated by many! There's a lot of people in this town who look at that flag flying fee next to the courthouse when they drive by, and the free democracy that flag and that building stands for. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/OGEflag03.jpg 

I saw on the 5:30pm news this week where next spring Walmart plans to add the ability for people to download music from their website for 88 cents a song. With over 200,000 songs to choose from their database, it sounds like a deal to me. Now if they will just let me use my PayPal account to pay, I will be downloading! http://www.ajc.com/business/content/business/1203/18walmart.html

Recorded by Betty Carroll October 23, 1984: "Once upon a time.... "there are indications that people lived in southern Oklahoma long before the white men came and even before the aboriginal Indian tribes appeared. There are even hints there may have been people around here in the days of the wooly mammoths, and migrations through this area when the Incas flourished in central America. An Oklahoma University geologist found a skeleton near Ardmore that was said to be 3,000 years old. The OU man was Albert Giles, and he made the discovery during a geology field trip along Hickory Creek in the edge of Criner Hills southwest of Ardmore. His discovery was hailed as a great find, indicating the scientists say, that this ancient person may have died in quicksand."

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Just to say" Thankyou" so, so much for your weekly news. I read every bit of it and enjoy it so much. We are pretty healthy here in Ontario, Canada. Most people get their flu shots and so we don't get that nasty bug. We have a bit of snow now, very pretty, 3 little boys across the street from me built 2 HUGE snowmen. So lovely for me to see. I have no idea how they built them so tall. Over 10 feet tall, Daddy must have given a hand ..:) I am making my ice candle holders again this year, makes it look like fairyland out side my door. I use 4 different sizes of pails to fill with water to freeze."
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Hello Butch and T&T. The Wagon Wheel Cave is indeed at Turner Falls. The canyon that goes south and a little east from the Falls is where the cave is located. As I remember, it is about 1/2 mile walking distance and it is on the east side of the canyon. It is very a very steep climb and you almost have to have a ladder to get in the cave. The cave is only about 50 to 60 feet deep. When I was going to High School in Davis in the early 50's my best friend and schoolmate, Thomas Hyden and I explored all of the area around Turner Falls, most of it back to the west of the Falls. Thanks." -Joe Black http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/wagonwheelcave.jpg
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"In the mid 1940's, some friends and I visited the Wagon Wheel Cave. We went down to Turner Falls and followed a trail going south down the canyon. I remember it as being no more than 200 yards from the falls area. The cave is located to the left (east) and up high on a rock face cliff. It is an easy climb to the cliff but you need some help when you reach the cliff. Someone had placed a tree trunk from the top of the incline to the cave. We were able to climb up the trunk and enter the cave. It was just a round hole in the face of the cliff that you could stand upright in. It was not very deep or impressive in any other way." -Gene Reed
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"We just returned from a cruise in the Caribbean. As we were walking in Cozumel, Mexico we saw this bell and I thought you might be interested in it. My husband thinks it must have been a Coast Guard bell. That is all the information we have on the bell but thought we would send it to you." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/CozumelBell03.jpg
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"Hi Butch. I have been in the cave you pictured as "Wagon Wheel Cave...Turner Falls" many times as a kid. in the late 30's. It was hard to get into. the cave from the trail below. as the wall below the cave was slick rock. We usually found a forked limb to act as a ladder and climb into the cave. I don't know if it went very far into the hill as the opening closed down very quickly We had no desire to explore and didn't try to crawl into the small opening.at the back of the cave mouth." -Bill Uhles
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"Hi Butch. Last weeks T&T was very interesting. I am looking for a picture of the Carter Avenue Methodist church when it was a Methodist church. I think it now is a Mormon church. My grandparents, J F and Lora Floyd attended that church back in the 40's and 50's. I remember the ice cream socials they had. My grandfather received a plaque for perfect attendance for 30 years. If anyone has a picture of the outside or inside of that church, I sure would appreciate a copy. Thanks and keep up the good work." -Richard Henry
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"Butch, I thought EVERYONE remembered the old Skyview Drive-In. There was also a drive in movie in town where the bank is on the corner across the street from the Montgomery Ward mall (or where MW used to be) and there was also one south of town up on the hill south of the Moose Lodge (that used to be the Club Avalon). One time a bunch of us went to the Skyview and across the highway there was a little beer joint. Kitty Wells was singing there that night and when the movie was over there was a minor traffic jam what with the movie traffic and the people who had come to hear her sing. Hadn't thought of that in a bazillion years."
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"Butch, I'd like to have any information about the history of the old Legate community and the people who lived there. Would especially like to have pictures of any part of the community if there are any available. I would really like to know something about Laban 'Lab' Byrd and his wife Deliah Whitfield. They both died in 1915 and are buried at Legate. Folks can e-mail me." Bud Caudle budc34@cableone.net
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"Butch, The influenza epidemic of 1918 was called "Spanish Influenza". My mom lost her birth mother to it. Mom had been born in 1911 (she'll be 93 years old next month, January 9th) and still remembers those days (even though she may not remember what she had for lunch today). Her mom's last words to her husband (my grandfather) were, "what will you do?" (meaning how could he take of their 3 small daughters?). Mom remembers how she helped where she could, but my granddad always saw to it that the girls had clean clothes to wear, good shoes on their feet and he'd tie ribbon bows in their hair before they left for school. Later he met and married a charming schoolteacher to help raise his girls and together, they added a son to the family. Mom's the only one left of that generation." -Roy Kendrick RoyKendrick@oklahomahistory.net
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"My Dad was a fireman for the Katy RailRoad in 1918. He was the first one at the train to get it fired up and after two hours and the rest of the crew did not show, the Yard Master came and told him to shut it down as he was the only ne left alive in his crew. The rest died of the flu during the night. I also lost a brother and Uncle to the flu." -Paskell Poindexter, CA
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"Hi Butch, Santa Claus has answered your wish, I will get possession of a Folger Adams key very soon and I'm going to send it to you. Please confirm your mailing address and I will send the key along with some company info for you." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/jailkey.jpg
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"Oklahoma New Mexico & Pacific Rail To Be Removed. The extreme west end of what remains of the old Oklahoma, New Mexico and Pacific rail line will soon be removed to make way for road improvements. I shot the attached photos today, 12-17-03, which show the preparation for straightening the curved section of 12th St. where it intersects with Kings Road about two miles west of Ardmore. The ONMP which became known as the Ringling Road once built and served the towns of Lone Grove, Wilson, Healdton and Ringling. The rails shown in the photos are part of a one mile abandoned section between Plainview Road and Kings Road which is now owned by Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railroad but hasn't been used in years. These rails are of historical value not only because being part of the original ONMP line but also because they are some of the oldest rails in Oklahoma. The rails sections shown being prepared to be removed have stamped dates of 1900 making them 103 years old." -C. Dwane Stevens, Ardmore, Okla http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/ONMPkingsroad3a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/ONMPkingsroad3b.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/ONMPkingsroad3c.jpg
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"Do you know the cemetery name in the Addington Bend area (Love county)? As a kid we called it Graveyard Bluff (This is different from the GY Bluff on the island on Texoma.). It overlooks an area of the Red River where Addington Bend runs into Horseshoe Bend towards Loves Valley. There are several stones there and all flat on the ground because of cattle being on the place. The property owner I believe is Rick Monkres place on Addington Bend Road."
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"The lights at Regional Park are beautiful as are the ones at Central Park. But I will always remember the Daube window. That was before everyone had lights all over their homes. Every little kid in town I think made a trip to Daube's to see the magic!!! I miss it. Maybe I'm just being a little nostalgic at this time of year but sometimes when we didn't have so much....I think we appreciated the small things more. I also remember the first artificial tree we had. It was one of the tinsel trees. I have a picture of my mom by it. We were really up town then. My children(now 29 and 31) remember their times of going thru the Wilson Oklahoma Winterland (can't remember their names) but every Christmas we made our little drive thru there. My mother is 94 and her memories of Christmas is going to the Baum school house and all the kiddo's getting an apple and orange. That was basically her Christmas in those years of long ago...but I always saw the joy on her face when she told about the community Christmas party." -Sylvia Moore
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The Carter County Courthouse Christmas tree contest continues! The sheriffs office is ahead in votes, and the Mapping Dept on the 4th floor is coming in second right now. If you havent voted, be sure and cast your choice of the best Christmas tree! Just click at the bottom of the Voting Box to see the latest talley. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/christmastrees.html

I want to thank all of you who have sent Christmas wishes to me, whether it was by email, instant messenger or snailmail. Without a doubt Christmas is the most wonderful time of the year.

"Just remember this, Mr. Potter! That this rabble you're talking about, they do most of the working and paying and living and dying in this community. Well, is it too much to have them work and pay and live and die in a couple of decent rooms and a bath?" -George Bailey (James Stewart) in the 1946 greatest Christmas movie of all time, 'Its a Wonderful Life'

Happy Holidays everyone! See you next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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Saturday December 13, 2003 T&T Weekly Vol 7 Issue 347

With the flu bug causing almost hysteria the past few days in the U.S., I remember a lady over in the northeast part of Ardmore telling me that when she was a child the influenza epidemic of 1918 had a grip on this country and Oklahoma. She and her family lived across the street (604 'H' NE) from my great grandmother, Ida Murphree Miller, and her whole family was deathly sick with the flu. She said her parents were so sick they couldnt even get out of bed to take care of the children nor even cook to feed themselves. Everyone was scared of catching this deadly flu in 1918 that had swept the world. The health officials put a sign on their door saying this household had the flu. She said my great grandmother Ida Miller was the only person who would come into their house and cook and feed them until they got better. She said they would have probably died had it not been for Ida Miller and her courage to come into the house to cook, clean, wash, etc. Here is a pix of my great grandmother Ida Murphree Miller on her 90th birthday. She lived to be 92 and died in 1965. I sure miss helping her make that lye soap every Fall. http://www.brightok.net/~bridges/miller1.jpg http://www.buffalocommons.org/docs/1918flu.html

We are still gathering a piece of information here and a piece of information there on Hattye. Some more of you have joined us in this effort and shown your support with a pledge. Thanks. I still believe her remains will come home someday to be next to her family's. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bringhattyehome.html 

A Reader told me this week they still have just one traffic signal in the whole county of Pushmataha county, (Antlers, Oklahoma). I hope when they finally add the second light, they have a big all day celebration! Of course, I guess it wont matter, looks like the guy in that little pickup truck just flat run that red light! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/antlight.jpg 

Former Sheriff of Carter County, Gerald Cobb, emailed me a photo of himself this week so I could add it to the Sheriffs webpage of former sheriffs. I only lack 4 pics now! If anyone knows of good photo of the remaining four, let me know. http://www.brightok.net/cartercounty/photos/cobbgerald.jpg http://www.brightok.net/cartercounty/CarterCountySheriffs.html

Some of you will remember reading in the T&T last December where the First Presbyterian Church was packing their bells for shipment to The Netherlands for tuning. Bill Lumpkin told me this week progress in The Netherlands was going well. The church will be restoring the bells and pull mechanisms just like they were when new. Its sure going to be beautiful to hear those bells pealing our again across downtown Ardmore. Bill Lumpkin said they are still seeking donations to help pay for the restoration of this piece of Ardmore history. Here are six photos sent from The Netherlands this week showing the workers turning the bells with their equipment.

And these are the photos taken last December of the bells being removed and made ready for the wooden crates for shipment overseas. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/presbell2.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/presbell3.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/presbell4.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/presbell5.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/presbell5a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/presbell5b.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/presbell5c.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/presbell5d.jpg 

83 year old Pat Ratliff of Lone Grove has been tearing quarters in half with his bare hands all his life (does that leave him with 2 bits??). Anyway, this week he used that same strength to break a carjacker's arm when they tried to steal his car. Pat has got to be a breed of American that is slowing fading away. http://www.ardmoreite.com/stories/121003/loc_carjacking.shtml

A Reader sent in an old photo of Wagon Wheel Cave. The Reader thought it was near Turner Falls, but I couldn't find anything on it when I did a search on the Net. I did find two Brownsville, Oklahomas. One somewhere in Marshall county and the other somewhere in Hughes county. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/wagonwheelcave.jpg 

This is an email I received where I asked about Wagon Wheel Cave: "Dear Butch, I found an old 1958 report on Wagon Wheel Cave, it said that the cave is one and a half mile north of Brownville, Oklahoma and that the cave is filled with trash, including an old wagon wheel. The cave is about 100 feet long. If you go to the cave take a trash bag with you, it sounds like it could use a clean up. Sincerely, Bill Torode, NSS library" http://www.caves.org/ 

Has anyone heard of a Wagon Wheel Cave?

A friend in Lone Grove has a nice classic car for sale. Its got the suicide doors which makes the car really neat. It is a 1949 Mercury and it runs great, purrs like a kitten! If you know anyone interesting in this piece of history, call 580-657-3457 for details. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/1949Mercury.jpg 

I noticed this week the new CableOne towercam here in Ardmore is up and running. You can catch a glimpse of downtown Ardmore on cable channel 7.

Fay Wray is pushing 96 now. You say you dont know who Fay Wray is? She's the blonde lady King Kong was in love with in that 1933 film. http://www.shillpages.com/faywray/wrayfq01.jpg http://www.shillpages.com/faywray/fwmain.shtml

Recorded by Betty Carroll October 30, 1984: "Once upon a time.... there was a big old home on 3rd Northeast just outside of the city limits where Felix and Callie Boyd King reared 9 children and operated one of Ardmore's first dairy farms. The big, 3-story home was built by the Kings in 1905 and had a total of 22 rooms. They moved out in 1942 and the home was used as a nursing home for the elderly. Before moving to Ardmore, Felix King was a druggist at Berwyn (now Gene Autry). Mrs. King was the daughter of the Boyd who was a partner of a man named Love who operated the Boyd and Love Oil Springs Health Resort, first northeast of Marietta then at the springs of Oil Creek which are now on the Goddard Ranch northeast of Gene Autry. This information is from the Ardmore Public Library from the files of Mac McGalliard of his Reporter's Notebook columns."

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"I am aware of the Folger Adams Company making jail keys here in Joliet, Illinois. I don't think that they are still a viable company at this time, due to the fact of technology replacing tumbler type locks. If you are interested in the company, let me see what I can find for you, as you may or may not know, we had two prisons in this town. (one now shut down but Statesville is still going strong) the one that has been shut down is the same one you will see in the movie the "BLUES BROTHERS". In fact, Dan Ackroid and John Belushi's characters were named for two neighboring towns "JOLIET" and "ELWOOD". http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/jailkey.jpg
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"I found the article about the UFO outbreak over Oklahoma in 1965. I remember that night very way. I was at church camp in Bristow Okla. It was the last night of the camp meeting. I was setting with my mom and our minister's wife at that back of the sanctuary. The sanctuary is large canopy. We were actually outside, I was sitting on the ground not watching the sermon. That was when I saw it, coming out of the North into the eastern sky. It was quiet, very bright and flat. Descending in the East. I had to get the attention of everyone around me. My mom, the preacher's wife and her son. We all watch it as it descended beyond some trees in the far distance. After that we discussed what we saw. A plane, or a shooting star no one was for sure. After the sermon my dad arrived to take us home. Getting out of the car the first thing he asked was if we'd seen any fling saucers? "They've been seeing them all over the state," he said. We knew then what we saw in the sky. It was very strange that night. I knew the chances of me seeing a UFO was astronomical. Sometimes the impossible happens." -Tony Trammell http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ufo.html
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"I noticed the reference to the Turner Falls Indian (Wirt Franklin) in your November 22 T&T. I have asked the same question of some acquaintances over the years and found out only this much.

1. My information suggests only three existed. One at Turner Falls as we know, another atop the Wirt Franklin Gas station (location of BancFirst presently) and the third on a five or six foot pedestal on the S.E. corner of Main and D St. S.W., the location of the same station.

2. After WWII, when Mr. Franklin sold or leased the station to others, the two at the station location were removed. One was stored horizontally behind the station (1945-1947 approx) and the other shipped to Ballinger, Texas (about 30 miles south of Abeline) where my uncle, Elmer Shepperd, then mayor of Ballinger had my father, V.A. Grissom who operated Grissom Drug Company across the street from the station, arrange its sale (or gift) by Wirt Franklin or other owners, to the city of Ballinger for their city park overlooking a scenic creek on a bluff above. He had seen it numerous times during visits to Ardmore. I saw it there in my visits to Ballinger as a boy at the end of WWII. While it was a resident of Ballinger, it fell upon hard times, becoming the target of local pranksters/vandals who, as I understand, roped it and dragged it into the creek below resulting in a total smashup of the whole piece. Not much else to do in Ballinger for fun I suppose.

3. The other stored one... I haven't a clue as to its history or disposition.

All were symbols of Wirt Franklin's Palacine Oil Company and were known as the "Palacine Indians". The cast metal part (statue only) stood approximately 12 to 15 feet tip of finger to toe, constructed of cast metal (?) and the figure stood atop a rock molded from the same stuff adding another 3 or 4 feet. An inscription, in the metal, at the base of each was simply "A Friend" cast into the rock-pedestal portion of the sculpture. All of this was mounted on some sort of concrete base.

"Boots" Adams, (son of C.F. Adams I think) operated the station about this time and he might have had a hand in their disposal...don't know if he is still around. He also had a tire shop, as I recall on West Broadway near the present YWCA before acquiring this station. Other operators followed him about whom I know nothing."
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"Hello Butch, As always I am enjoying the T & T each week, seems like it gets better from week to week. Thanks for all your hard work and time spent. As often mentioned by many of your readers, you are much appreciated by lots of people. Was wondering if anyone remembers the old skyview drive-in theater east of town. There was a time in the mid '50's that it was a very popular place to go. They had good food, cold drinks, popcorn and some some good films sometimes."
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"Click here for a satellite Earth View." (zoom in and see the lights of Dallas/Ft Worth easily) http://www.fourmilab.ch/cgi-bin/uncgi/Earth?imgsize=320&opt=-l&lat=-33.4167&ns=North
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"We wrote a play about Buttermilk, Oklahoma!" http://ardmoreite.com/stories/120803/loc_small.shtml
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"Ardmore-Akron Tire & Rubber Company closed its doors sometime between 1922-1926, but they were actually bought out by. I know this because I have been doing research into another of their companies, Oklahoma Peerless Oil & Refining Company of Ardmore OK. If you or your readers have any information on this company, it would be appreciated. I am doing research for a lady who is in dire financial need. Her grandfather purchased 500 shares in Oklahoma Peerless Oil & Refining Company in 1909? or 1919? It was signed by Elmer S. Wood President, and Fox Wood, Secretary. Any information would be appreciated. Send info to Brenda67sue@yahoo.com or BowmanSharonM@yahoo.com Thank you. And I really like your website!"
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"I'm working on a.... well old computer. It has a socket 3 square CPU slot and a 486 Dx2 CPU Chip. It's missing a "thin long spring loaded metal clip" that holds the cpu heat sink on. The clip goes across the heat sink over the cpu chip to snap on to the ends of the square socket 3 slot built into the mother board. This has got to be a hard to find item, but maybe you've got one or one of your readers will know where to find one. The socket 7 clip is to long and I don't know if a socket 5 would work. There is nothing holding the heat sink on the cpu and the original self stick paper has been removed. Thanks." jj_bonnano@yahoo.com
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"Butch, I'm still on my quest to photograph early day oil field relics in Carter County. Here's some more samples. I like the one with the unique exhaust vent on top of the old pump house, reminds me of Darth Vader's Space Helmet. There's a shot of the inside of the building showing the old pump assembly still standing and a close up of the name plate on the pump. This building is located NW of Healdton, Oklahoma." -C. Dwane Stevens http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/HealdtonPumpStation03a.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/HealdtonPumpStation03b.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/HealdtonPumpStation03c.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/HealdtonPumpStation03d.jpg
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"I enjoyed browsing through your web pages. However, I am looking for any information about the founding of Slaughterville, Oklahoma or anything else about its history. Do you have any information about this? Thanks." bob@wolfenet.com
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Below are a couple emails from this week's ConnectOklahoma Listserver. If your not a subscriber (its free), then your messing out on some good posts! http://www.oklahomahistory.net/connectoklahoma.html 

"I remember well 62 years ago today. I was 7 years old, had gone to the "picture show" with my older brother and a friend of the family that was about 16. We went to the Ritz Theater. While we were there a friend of this girl came in and told her that we were at war with the Japanese. I didn't even know who the Japanese were but it scared me to death. When we left to go home my brother and this girl wanted to walk home but I began to cry that the Japanese would get us and we had to call Daddy to come after us. I made such a fuss that they did call. I remember the slogans, Kilroy was here, we had to eat all the food on our plate, candy was scarce, my beloved cousin, Doodle Guess had to go in the service. I was almost 12 before it ended and a lot of boys from our neighbor hood left and some didn't return. Wars didn't last a few weeks then. WW2 was a bad time for this country but the people stood well and didn't try to hinder like today. I have enjoyed the emails for Okla history. Grew up in Ardmore but have been a long time gone. You can leave Ardmore and Okla but it doesn't leave you. Still love it." -Jo Evelyn Barton joeveb2003@sbcglobal.net
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"Linda, I was eleven years old and remember that day quite clearly. My family was living in Alva. My Dad and brothers and I were getting into the car when our neighbor came to the fence to tell us what he had just heard on the radio. I remember glancing skyward, half expecting to see fighter planes overhead. (My sense of geographical distance improved in the days that followed and newspaper stories gave as much information as could be gathered). Dad tried to enlist, but was not accepted because of his age. I shudder to think how our family could have subsisted without our breadwinner. Automobile manufacturing was shut down immediately so the factories could build tanks and other war vehicles. Rationing began. Sugar and meat and butter were sorely missed. I still have some of the family's ration-stamp books. Nylon had been developed just a few years ealier and more women could afford that than the silk stockings previously in fashion, but nylon was needed for parachutes. We schoolkids scoured vacant lots for scrap metal. Cotton cloth was very scarce. Rayon was used for clothing and had to be laundered very carefully as the fibers were weak when wet and tended to separate into shreds. Farm families were envied a bit because they obtained some cotton fabric in the prized feed sacks. Many families were already accustomed to hardships because the nation still had not fully shaken off all the effects of the Depression. We were willing to endure even more because we felt so helpless. The news was always so bad...especially the incredible losses in the Philippines. Much more to relate, but I'll yield the podium to others." -Elizabeth Dyer
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"I, too, remember well that Sunday afternoon when we heard the word that the Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor. I was eight years old and living in Lawton. My aunt and uncle from Stillwater had driven down to Lawton for the week-end. After church, they had taken my brother and I to visit another aunt and uncle at Elgin. That afternoon we were driving back to Lawton - we were just even with the Polo Field at Ft. Sill - I will never forget it - when my uncle turned on the car radio and we heard the news. There was talk of little else but the war during my childhood. Living so close to Ft. Sill, I saw thousands of soldiers on the streets of Lawton. My brothers had been working for Bateson Construction Company of Dallas, building barracks at Ft. Sill and Paris, Texas - in anticipation of war with Germany. My older brother wanted to join the service (Air Force) right away, but was asked to complete the work at Paris and he did. He was later with the 8th Air Force in England, shot down over enemy occupied France and got back to England 42 days later through the efforts of the French Resistance (Underground). My other brother was a senior in High School, graduated in May, but Dad would not sign for him to join the Navy as he was underage. He signed on his 18th birthday in September. He was a pharmacist mate (corpsman) with several Marine Air Groups all over the Pacific. My Mom was secretary and event co-ordinator at the NCCS (Catholic) U.S.O. club in Lawton. She helped so many servicemen, their sweethearts and wives and families during the war. When she could not find hotel rooms for them, she brought them home with her. She also planned entertainment events. As now, it was a very traumatic time for families who had members in the various branches of service - there were just more of them then. We owe them all such a debt of gratitude. My prayers are always that those who are serving now will come home safely." -Irish Annie in Lone Grove.
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"I too remember that Sunday December 7th, 1941! After church, my dad drove mom to visit a family friend and while she was in the house, he, my 2 brothers, and I waited in our 1939 Pontiac and dad turned on the car radio. We found the news shocking and disturbing. Because dad had 3 small children, he was given a temporary deferment. Many young men immediately volunteered to join the various services. I think the military was almost overwhelmed with the number of volunteers, but they also drafted many. Dad sought and got a job with Douglas Aircraft at the new plant at Midwest City which was building C-47 cargo planes. He took great pride in his work and when the plant had an open-house to show the public what they were accomplishing, he took us to the plant to show us around and to show us the milling-machine that he used to create parts with. Dad was trained to be a jig builder (a jig is a tool used to help create unusual parts that cannot be made in a mold nor on a standard lathe). He later used this same training after the war as an employee at Little Giant Pump Company and then later at the Aero Commander Aircraft plant in Bethany, OK.

Two of my friends spent much of the war in Japanese prison camps. Coach Faye Odell was imprisoned by the Japanese early in the war, as was Wayne Liles. Wayne was a survivor of the Bataan Death March. He weighed about 80 pounds when he was rescued and when I knew him, he was closer to 200. Last I heard was that his widow was still living. Wayne was already doing farm reports on KWTV when I went to work there in 1957 and was still there when I left in 1966. He and his wife were also members of the church where I'd attended for more than 20 years (before I moved to Perry) and they were best friends with my aunt Margaret Basey for 40+ years. I asked Wayne if he'd written down some of his wartime experiences so that his kids would know of the horrors of war (he was reluctant to talk to anyone about most of them), and he replied yes, and that they already knew some of the stories. Coach Odell was imprisoned at the Fall of Corregidor as I recall. Most of these survivors suffered the effects from this lengthy and tortured experience for many years after their release." -RoyKendrick@oklahomahistory.net
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I've set up the webpage for the county Christmas Tree contest again this year. Just go to the link below, look over the trees, then vote the one of your choice! http://www.oklahomahistory.net/christmastrees.html

When the late Nat King Cole was introduced to Carolyn Leigh, his first words were "I goofed." He was referring to the fact that he had turned down this song a year before, dismissing it as one for the "geriatric set." In the interim, Frank Sinatra had made the definitive hit recording of it. Avant-garde arranger Johnny Richards wrote the melody, determined to produce a "commercial" singable hit. Several writers attempted lyrics, but none came up with a set to match the sunny mood of the tune until the publisher approached Miss Leigh. At the time her father, a man with a great zest for life, had become ill and depressed. "I wrote the words for him," she recalled for this Reader's Digest Songbook article interview, "using some of his own philosophy to cheer him up. When the song became No. 1, he became the most happy fella in the hospital."

"Fairy tales can come true,
It can happen to you
If you're young at heart.
For it's hard, you will find,
To be narrow of mind
If you're young at heart.

You can go to extremes
With impossible schemes,
You can laugh when your dreams
Fall apart at the seams.
And life gets more exciting
With each passing day
And love is either
In your heart or on its way.

Don't you know that it's worth
Every treasure on Earth
To be young at heart,
For as rich as you are
It's much better by far
To be young at heart.

And if you should survive
To 105
Look at all you'll derive
Out of being alive,
Then here is the best part
You have a head start
If you are among
The very young at heart.

Don't you know that it's worth
Every treasure on Earth
To be young at heart,
For as rich as you are
It's much better by far
To be young at heart.

And if you should survive
To 105
Look at all you'll derive
Out of being alive,
Then here is the best part
You have a head start
If you are among
The very young at heart."

-Carolyn Leigh 1954
http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/leigh.jpg
http://persweb.direct.ca/fstringe/oz/f8.html

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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Saturday December 6, 2003 T&T Weekly Vol 7 Issue 346

I think we have made more progress this week in the Bring Hattye Home effort, but there is still more to do if it is to ever happen. Thanks to a couple of T&T Readers I was able to make contact with the grandson of Hattye Hinkle Chandler in Florida. Jim Hill is living in the Florida sunshine state these days and we've had a couple of good conversations about his grandmother Hattye.

Hattye died before Jim was born, but he had heard stories about her from his mother, Hazen Hill, and about the strained relationship between the Chandlers and the Hinkles. As Jeddie Harrison and I had surmised in our first talks, there could have been bad blood between Hattye's husband James Chandler and her father Judge Hinkle.

Another painting has surfaced this week in Ardmore of Hattye, and we were surprised at the artist's name on this painting (more on this artist later). It is a beautiful color crayon portrait. When I look at the closeup pix of this painting, it is hard for me to believe it was done in crayon. Oh what talent! Just visit Hattye's webpage to see this new color portrait and how beautiful Hattye was as a young lady. There is also a link to the close-up of Hattye 4 paragraphs down the webpage. Anyway, I believe with all these pieces of info coming in, it warrants more research. We do appreciate the support shown in the way of pledges. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/bringhattyehome.html 

This is a link to a front page article in The Daily Ardmoreite this week (12/04/03) about Jeddie finding at a garage sale the painting that Hattye painted back around 1895. http://www.ardmoreite.com/stories/120403/loc_hinkle.shtml

A T&T Reader's mother here in Ardmore had four black and white photos of the students performing in one of Mrs. Doris Duston's circus plays at the Civic Auditorium back in the early 60s. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/Duston3a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/Duston4a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/Duston5a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/Duston6a.jpg 

Another Reader bought a framed photograph at a garage sale. You can see it was an important meeting of some kind with Indians and whitemen in attendance, maybe some treaty signing? It shows in the lower right hand corner the photographer as Schultz. Anyway, I hope someone out there can shed some light on this old photo. These first three are reduced pics so they dont take long to load. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/IndianMeeting2b.jpg http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/IndianMeeting3b.jpg http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/IndianMeeting4b.jpg

These are over 300k pics and takes a while to load, but much more detailed. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/IndianMeeting2.jpg  http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/IndianMeeting3.jpg  http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/IndianMeeting4.jpg

Here is an interesting postcard of Ardmore's Carnegie Library back in 1908. There are many pictures of the library back in those days. What caught my attention on this one is the 2-story house across the street. This looks like it would be the SE corner of Stanley and "E" Street SW. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/ardcarnegie1908.jpg

A Reader stopped at Boot Hill at Dodge City, Kansas last week and took some pics of the old bell that is on display there. I only been there one time and vaguely remember the place. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/BootHill1.jpg http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/BootHill2.jpg  http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/BootHill4.jpg http://www.boothill.org/intro.html 

Ospam is working better with each passing week as I get it fined tuned to filter spam. I see several of you have started using Ospam. One thing for sure, it works! http://www.0spam.com/

Herman and Diane Caudle were at the courthouse this week taking care of business and Herman was driving his 1949 Ford. It is one beautiful machine. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/CaudleCar.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/CaudleCarMotor.jpg

I've tried several CD burner programs, and its seemed like they all required me to click my mouse a dozen or two times, just to start burning a couple of photo Folders to a CD or archiving and emergency restore purposes. This week I ran across a little free CD/DVD Burner that is so simple to work. Just a couple of mouse clicks and its burning. Fast too! ttp://www.deepburner.com/

Recorded by Betty Carroll October 30, 1984: "Once upon a time.... there was a trail from Duncan to Ardmore. "It went into Ardmore near the standpipe. It went through or by Prairie Valley, Enterprise, Newport, Sneed, Wheeler, Graham, Fox and other places to Duncan. There were no large creeks to cross, and no bridges." According to a letter from James Steel to Mac McGallaird and reported in his Reporter's Notebook column. "All of the cotton was hauled from Duncan to Ardmore until the Rock Island Railroad was built to Duncan, Ardmore was the inland cotton market for many years. The Santa Fe Railroad was built to Ardmore in 1887 and 1888. The farmers and freighters drove their teams and wagons loaded with the big bales of cotton to Ardmore, the teams and wagons were put in a wagon yard. The farmer and his cotton money were soon parted if he took too much liquid celebration and mixed with the wrong kind of people. The virgin land produced cotton and other crops almost beyond imagination today."

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

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"I, too, would like to honor Doris Duston. She worked so hard on putting on the Spring Circus. My sister and I performed in, at least, three of them and it was such fun!"
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"Tell LaRita McCabe Reynes that I have at least one picture of Ms. Duston's "circus" at the Civic Auditorium (it will ALWAYS be the Civic Auditorium to me)."
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"I just watched the Lake Murray DVD on my tv. What a wonderful piece of history. I've always been interested in the WPA projects around the state. They did a wonderful job building the amphitheater and lodge, etc at Wintersmith Park in Ada, and the park at Sulphur. After seeing this DVD, you realize how many improvements have been made to Lake Murray through the years. Thanks for your work on this project. Makes you hope more old films will be found."
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"Butch, I would like to find out if I can order one of those DVD's of Lake Murray 1936. My father from Custer County was a supervisor or some position there (I have a photo of him in his office and the calendar behind him is on July 1936)."
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"Do you know the address of the "Duston Building" in downtown Ardmore? It is mentioned in the Daily Ardmoreite Aug 4, 1894. "W.O. Duston and J. B. Spragins returned last evening from a chicken hunt. They report having had a successful time killing forty or fifty of the prairie feathered beauties. Douglas & Douglas architects today awarded the contract for the W.O. Duston brick building to T.N. Harris. The figures are about $4,000. Work will be commenced at once; the building completed as soon as men and money can do it."
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"Butch, Wayne's (Payne Grocery) brother Earl was married to my aunt Bertha Holley. I remember going in there in my early teens for a Chocolate Soldier pop and candy." -Kirk Holley Smith, Hamilton, Montana
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"Friends, my cousin loaned me her digital camera for a few days to try out so I stopped by the old ONMP line west of Uniroyal and shot a few photos. The rail shots are of the extreme west end of the one mile abandoned section located at the intersection of Kings Rd. and 12th Street (one mile west of Uniroyal). As you can see in the photo the rail date is 1900. Ken, I didn't hike down to the bridges that are falling in because as you can see it's very brushy and I didn't have my "brush clothes" on at the time! Besides I'm waiting on you to go with me! The photo of the Ardmore switcher is behind Uniroyal. They had a car on the ground and the crew had just finished putting it back on the rails when I shot this photo. Some of the photos are grainy because I did a lot of cropping to them and the lighting wasn't the best." -Dwane Stevens http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/ONMP1a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/ONMP2a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/ONMP3a.jpg
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Carter County: The Daily Ardmoreite, Thursday Jan 18, 1893.

Miss Hattie HINKLE has returned from an extended visit to Little Rock, Ark. Miss Hattie HINKLE is visiting relatives and friends in Arkansas. Judge HINKLE, Silas BOYD, and Will PYEATT came in from the canyon this evening, where they had been for the past several days fishing and rusticating. They brought with them a nice lot of fish and remembered the Ardmoreite with a liberal supply for which due thanks are extended.

JUDGMENT (US Court, Indian Terr., Southern Dist. Ardmore): W.F. Cobb, et al. VS Choctaw Nation. On this the I8th day of January, I898, came on to be heard the report of the Master in Chancery in the above styled cause , and after duly considering said report and the evidence in support hereof, the Court is of the opinion that said report ought to be confirmed. Wherefore, it is adjudged and decreed by the Court that the report of the Master in Chancery, John Hinkle, in the above styled cause be and the same is hereby confirmed and it is hereby ordered adjudged and decreed by the Court that the following named applicants be and they are hereby adjudged and decreed to be citizens of the Choctaw Nation and entitled to be enrolled upon the rolls of Choctaw citizenship, to-wit:

W.F. Cobb, Ida May Cobb, wife of W. F. Cobb, Grace M Cobb, Walter M.Cobb, Lillian B. Cobb, Sallie B. Cobb, Hugh T. Cobb, and Geo. A. Cobb; Geo. S. Cobb and M.F.A. Cobb, wife of Geo. S. Cobb, Simon S. Cobb, Ethel B. Cobb, Edna Cobb, Florence Clark Cobb/ wife of Simon S. Cobb, Claude Cobb and Nina Cobb, James Cobb Harrison, Jas. G. Harrison, Claud M. Harrison, Joe K. Harrison, Major·P. Harrison, Edgar G. Harrison, and Thos J. Harrison, Minnie Kelley Harrison wife of Claud M. Harrison; Mrs. A. .J. Dowd, Henry Jordon Cobb.

It is further adjudged and decreed by the Court that the above named applicants do have and recover of and from the Choctaw Nation all costs of this proceeding. Judge Hosea Townsend, Johnston Co: Tishomingo
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"Butch: Judge Hinkle lost his law office in the 1895 fire."
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"Butch, Could you please let everyone know who reads this very cool newsletter that I am searching for any and all Oklahoma Urban Legends, especially in the northeastern part of the state? I would also appreciate any Tribal legends as well (for example stories on the DeerWoman, Little people, etc). Much appreciated, and keep up the good work! Please send to Caitorrie@hotmail.com and title the email "ULS" so I don't accidentally delete it."
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"The KVSO tower on NW Blvd was there in 1984 and was probably taken down by 1988. The 1984 date is confirmed by a man who moved near there in 1984."
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"Hi Butch, I read the story about Katherine Cross blaming the doctor and the school teacher. The article did not say why the school teacher was arrested or how he had a part in the abortion related death? Do you know?"
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"We made a quick trip to Sulphur earlier in the week and noticed a lighted Christmas display along I-35N, just north of Ponders Restaurant at Exit 33. It went for quite a distance and really looked nice. Do you have any info on it? Question #2 - we passed Lake Jean Neustadt as we were headed south. In all the years we've passed by that lake, I can only remember seeing one person fishing on it? Do you have any info on the lake?"
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"I wondered if you'd post our Christmas for Critters event for December 13th to be held north of Claremore, Oklahoma at Foyil." http://www.wildheartranch.org/
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"We are new subscribers and enjoying T&T very much. In your Vol. 7, Issue 340, someone wrote in about Whit Carroll having a grocery store at Brock. He also had a cotton gin. He was Jim's great grandfather and we are living on land that was once his in Brock. He's also the same Whit Carroll that was mentioned in last week's Ledger in the column "From the Archives, 84 years ago." Also, in the Wed. Nov. 26 edition of the Daily Oklahoman, Food Section, there was an article on punch bowls and their history. One of them that was featured was designed by a silversmith named Walter Dean. It was designed for the battleship USS Oklahoma in 1912. The man's name sounded so familiar when I realized I had a set of silverware that had Walter C. Dean, Ardmore, I.T. on the box. I'm wondering if he once lived in Ardmore and if anyone would know about him. I called the Okla. Historical Society and the earliest he was listed was 1911, but I'm wondering if he lived in Ardmore before Statehood. If anyone could help, or could direct me how to find out more about this man, I would appreciate it." -Jim and Norma Carroll carrolling@brightok.net
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"Just try typing in http://memory.loc.gov/ then click Collections, and then type in Ardmore, Oklahoma and click search. If you want to see all the pictures and other items (there are 500) that relate to Oklahoma (not Ardmore) go back after you view the Ardmore Pictures and type in Oklahoma. Some of those pictures that had to do with poor people in Oklahoma were heart rending."
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"Here is an interesting weather info site." https://afweather.afwa.af.mil/
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"I read these mailings all the time and subscribe to Butch's great T&T newsletter and seldom have anything but pure joy to add. This time however I happened to read someone mention an old trolley over Turner Falls. Well I was eating in the Dougherty Diner in Davis and they have a great picture of it on the wall there. When I saw it I thought maybe others would enjoy seeing it also. The Dougherty Diner is located in davis about one block North of the stoplight on the west side. And by the way they cook a pretty mean(and Cheap) hamburger and I hear their catfish is good as well. Thanks for the entertainment." -David Dill
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I've been having problems getting my new DVD burner to burn blank DVDs. But just the last couple of days I think I've found the problem. Seems like those generic el cheapo blank DVDs I bought dont work well in my DVD burner. I bought some name brand and they are working fine. So hopefully I'll get caught up with all the requests for the DVDs soon. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/LynchMovieDVD.jpg

'An Unexpected Visitor'

I drove home after a long School day
And was glad it's over - needless to say
Walked in the door
As I've done a million times before
I couldn't believe what I found!
Scattered all around
Was green and black pills
The smell made me quite ill
My son made the stairs two at a time to check out the room
He let out a blood curdling scream
And this was no dream
I simply flew
Crying "What's the matter with you?"
He was standing at the door with an incredible look on his face
A smile - not a trace
In the middle of his bed stood - a sheep
It gave a mighty leap
Bounded out the door
I stood in amazement - as before
Catch him! I cried
I could have just died!
Then believe it or not - I heard a meow and we looked all around
In my room I finally found
Under the bed a mother cat and three new kittens
Enough said?
I saw red!
The moral of this story:
Be sure when you leave home- you shut the door tight
Or you could find an uninvited visitor - right?

-Irmadene Mapp Blankenship

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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Saturday November 29, 2003 T&T Weekly Vol 7 Issue 345

Just when I was getting a little discouraged trying to find relatives of Hattye Hinkle, at the last minute before this T&T came out, here comes an email from a Reader in Wilson! She found a relative of Hattye living in Ft Smith, Arkansas! The Ft Smith area is where Hattye's father, Judge John Homer Hinkle, came from when they relocated to Ardmore. I haven't had time to get hold of these Hinkles in Ft Smith yet, but I will! My aunt Helen Carmon (widow of Pratt Carmon) could really help here too if her mental state allowed. Sadly her mind is not what it used to be. She worked over 20 yrs for Hill Shoes at 123 West Main here in Ardmore years ago. Hazen Hill, born 1898 (she and husband Hubert Hill owned Hill's Shoes) is a daughter of Hattye Hinkle. The Carter County Pioneers Book lists 3 boys for Hubert and Hazen. James who died at age 2, Wilbert a pilot and killed while in active duty, and a James R. Hill. James and his wife Joan lived in California. James and Joan had a son James Chandler Hill. We can use all the help we can to find any kinfolk of Hattye and Hazen, so send us the names of any relatives you know about.

This is a photo of Hattye's daughter, Hazen Chandler Hill (1898-1990). http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/HillHazen.jpg

If anyone knows the whereabouts of any decendents of Hattye Hinkle or Hazen Hill, please let us know. Also several more of you have joined us in this effort to Bring Hattye Home. Everyone's pledge is appreciated. I believe patience and determination is the key here! http://www.oklahomahistory.net/bringhattyehome.html 

A Reader brought by two campaign cards of Carter County Sheriff Robert Denney. I notice two differences between the cards. One is a different Labor Union seal is on each card. The other is the 1988 election was held in the November General Election, meaning there must have been a Republican candidate running against him during that election. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/DenneyRobert7688.jpg 

Here is an interesting old photo sent in by a Reader who was raised in Lindsey, Oklahoma. I bet this brings back some memories. It sure did for me. Being raised in a lumber yard, I made several attempts to make a homemade cart, but didn't do to well. haha http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/LindsaySoapbox.jpg 

Here is another interesting photo I ran across this week. I guess its the first Ardmore High School before the one everyone is familiar with that is located at North Washington and 2nd. I believe that school was built around 1910. But this one is before that, maybe someone knows where it was located? http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/ArdmoreHighOld.jpg 

Ospam is working better with each passing week as I get it fined tuned to filter my spam. I see several of you have started using Ospam. http://www.0spam.com/

I've talked several times about my OklahomaHistory.net website's Hit-O-Meter the past few weeks. I reported a couple of weeks ago the photo of the spoon in the persimmon seed as receiving the most Hits with over 500 Hits. Not far behind is Katherine Cross's tombstone at Konawa, and coming in third is the Bring Hattye Home webpage. But what has really surprised me is the "Anti-Virus Help' webpage has came from almost obscurity after being created two years ago, to number 13 this month. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/virushelp.html 

Here is a list of the top 20 with number 1 at top:
persimmons3b.jpg konawa88.jpg bringhattyehome.html HinklePainting.jpg bellpage.html HinkleHattye2.jpg  GoodnightMarjorie.jpg coins.html hinkle3.jpg brownspr.html normanhill.jpg palacinestation.jpg  virushelp.html clouds2.jpg HinkleHattye.jpg

Recorded by Betty Carroll October 24, 1984: "Once upon a time.... in The Reporter's Notebook of April 2, 1967 Mac McGalliard interviewed Hale Dunn recalling his long years as a law enforcement officer in and around Ardmore. He was Ardmore Police Chief for 16 years, but before that, before 1924 he was deputy sheriff under the now almost legendary Sheriff Buck Garrett. He said Buck Garrett was Carter County's second sheriff, serving from about 1920 until 1924. The first sheriff was a man named Holmes Akers from Woodford, elected after statehood came in 1907. Garrett was Ardmore police chief before he became sheriff. When he became sheriff in 1924 he recalled there were only 8 in the department, including himself, 4 patrolmen, 2 jailers and a jail cook. The patrolmen worked in pairs on 12 hour shifts, and there were no days off. During his 16 years as chief, he got the force increased to 16 men and changed to 8 hour shifts."

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"I saw this week that a couple of people wanted to low down on Katherine Cross who died in 1917 and whose tombstone notes that she was killed by human wolves. Period newspaper accounts seem to indicate that she underwent an "illegal surgery" performed by a local doctor. It is assumed that this was referring to an abortion. She died soon after. The doctor had been charged with a similar charge on at least one previous occasion." -On the Trail, Diron Ahlquist, Oklahoma City, OK
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"Human wolves" are ones who are suffering from LYCANTHROPY, a disease that makes the person act and believe as though they are "possessed" by the werewolf curse. There is another associated genetic disorder, where they people LOOK like werewolves, but indeed are just very hairy." http://www.timberwolf.org/html/werewolf.html
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"I found the answer to the Katherine Cross tombstone question everyone was asking about.(If you haven'tt found it yet) Click on sites below." Seminole County genealogy website http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/ok/seminole/seminole.html Or you can go directly at ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ok/seminole/history/cross.txt
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"Butch, I was talking to an old timer in Konawa about the writing on Katherine Cross's headstone (Killed by human wolves. He told me that she had gotten pregnant out of wed lock. She had an abortion, The people who did the abortion, killed her and when the family found out about it they had it put on her stone, (KILLED BY HUMAN WOLVES) This is the story he told me." ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ok/seminole/history/cross.txt
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"Butch, I have seen this "killed by human wolves" story before. One of the OKC TV stations did a story on it some time ago. Found some links that make mention of the stone. As near as I can see, none tell the tale, but more reading bout this spooky little story." http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/OKGEN/1999-01/0917451789 http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/OKROOTS/1999-01/0917384056 http://www.ghostgadgets.com/media.html
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"This letter is in reference to that poor girl buried in Texas. That is such an abomination. I may only be able to give five or ten bucks a week but beginning next weekend I will begin to ferry you money to help. I will bring the money by on Saturday or Sunday and if you are not there I will leave it under a rock or something on your porch. If there is no rock I will bring one just in case. LOL This is a most noble thing you are doing."
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"The newspaper had some articles about old timers in September 1925: Came in with Santa Fe; Mrs. Hines has served here 38 years-Among the old timers, none of them could have lived in Ardmore much longer than Mrs. Ada Hines of A. Street Northeast. She and her husband Daniel Hines came here with the Santa Fe and she has been here since that time. It was I 1887 they landed here. Mrs. Hines said they feared starvation in Indian Territory and when they left Kansas City to come here, they brought quantities of flour and canned goods and vinegar and supplies to last the family for a year. Mrs. Hines said she has 'served' in this city for 38 years. She nursed the first woman that ever had a surgical operation here and her hands have always been busy. She has raised a family of honorable boys and clean girls and has buried a husband and she has a grandson sleeping in a soldier's grave. Her husband, in partnership with a man named Drake, owned the first lumberyard here, she says and they nailed the shingles on the first roof in the city. For 37 years, Mrs. Hines has lived at 407 A Street Northeast."
------------------------------------------------------------------------ "there has been several people trying to locate the Palacine Indian that was on Turner Falls lookout.... my guess it was used for scrap during WWII." -Bryan, Davis, Oklahoma http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/TurnerFallsIndian3a.jpg
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"I believe my dad said this was the first automobile to come to Marietta. Dr. Autry and Sam Fox." -Nellie http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/MariettaDoctor.jpg
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"I really wanted to lurk instead of write, but very little was said of Doris Duston. I was hoping to hear more about her in the years to follow all of us going our separate ways. I was in at least two of her circus performances and graduated from high school in 1954. I'm wondering if there were any photographs taken? Perhaps somebody in Ardmore could check the Ardmoreite?" -LaRita McCabe Reynes
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"Does anyone know the history on Creek Churches down and around Eufaula, Oklahoma? I am also interested in any urban legends from around that area." caitorrie@hotmail.com
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"Anyone remember the old cable car that stretched over Turner Falls? One could ride it across and back. I remember as a child riding across with my parents. It was so high I was on the verge of sheer terror."
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"Butch, I was surfing the net and ran into your newsletter, quite by accident. I wonder if your Readership knows how instrumental you were in the founding of the Oklahoma State Emergency Medical Technician Association. If I remember correctly, you attended the first meeting of the National EMT Association in Chicago." -Tom Cody in CA
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"Friends, We'll be showing work like this, A Wave for the Fireman, at the Oklahoma City Train Show December 6 and 7. It's the biggest show of its kind in the Southwest - and fills up the Travel and Transportation Building at the State Fairgounds. Hope to see you there! -Tom Elmore" http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/wavefireman.jpg
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"Butch, I can't believe you don't have Clyde Minter's grocery store on the grocery store list. It DID burn a long time ago however. It was on the NE corner of Hwy 70 and I think that's Plainview Road. Across the street/hwy from the car lots. I think there's a car wash there now. I'm just giving you a hard time today. Have a great Thanksgiving. I tried to get my kids to go someplace else but NOooooo, they have to come to Mother and Daddy's house!!!!!!!!!! Again, have a great day."
------------------------------------------------------------------------ "Here's a custom WWII diorama and figure I've finished. I built the diorama from scratch, even hand twisted the barb wire then I repainted the head to look more realistic. For those of you that know me well, you know I still love my toys. But most think I have TOO MUCH SPARE TIME.... "Life's a garden, DIG IT." -Bryan Pullen http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/pow03.jpg
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"Today I was working on another file, that of Ardmore Constable D.B. Cook and found a couple articles where John Braziel is the one who killed him. It sounds like from the two articles from the Daily Oklahoman, that Constable Cook was going to arrest John Braziel and Braziel shot him and both of the unarmed men walking with him about 2 a.m. J.A. Sims was dead at the scene, Cook died 4 hours later (6 a.m.) and Jim Billings recovered from his wounds."
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"Dear Butch, My favorite E-mail is your "This and That" RE: "A Song of Ardmore" I love that song. I graduated from Ardmore High in 1940. A couple of minor corrections to what you printed are: The second line should be "wafting o'er the air" rather than "waiting o'er the air." In the second verse it should be "From the sunny shores of Frisco" rather than "Even the sunny shores of Frisco"-------trivial matter! Thanks!"
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I've been working on making DVDs of the 1936 Jack Lynch Film on Lake Murray. I have a few DVDs ready at $5 each. So if you want one put your order in now. It is taking longer to make the DVDs then I originally thought it would. I dont have any on VHS yet but working on that too. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/LynchMovieDVD.jpg

The stars at night, are big and bright, (clap, clap, clap, clap)
Deep in the heart of Texas,
The prairie sky is wide and high, (clap, clap, clap, clap)
Deep in the heart of Texas.
The sage in bloom is like perfume, (clap, clap, clap, clap)
Deep in the heart of Texas,
Reminds me of, the one I love, (clap, clap, clap, clap)
Deep in the heart of Texas.
The coyotes wail, along the trail, (clap, clap, clap, clap)
Deep in the heart of Texas,
The rabbits rush, around the brush, (clap, clap, clap, clap)
Deep in the heart of Texas
The cowboys cry, "Ki-yip-pee-yi," (clap, clap, clap, clap)
Deep in the heart of Texas.
The doggies bawl, and bawl and bawl, (clap, clap, clap, clap)
Deep in the heart of Texas.

-by June Hershey, 1942
http://hotx.com/tjsjukebox/files/t002.html

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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Saturday November 22, 2003 T&T Weekly Vol 7 Issue 344

Several of you emailed me last week to say you want to help 'Bring Hattye Home'. I really do appreciate those of you who responded, because I have never taken on a project like this one. I know it will take all of us to make this happen. We are still working on the many details. As in so many things in life, its seems like getting that foothold in the beginning is the hardest part. I'll keep everyone up-to-date here. When I look at Hattye's expression in her photo, she seems so sad, as if she wished she were home in Ardmore.

I went to Rose Hill Cemetery this week and took some pics of the Hinkle family lot. There is plenty of room for Hattye and her beautiful granite marker. At the time of her death here in Ardmore in 1900, she and her father Federal Judge John Hinkle and wife Mary lived at 302 2nd SW (Stanley SW now). She died at noon that day in 1900, a service was held at the homeplace, and by midnight Harvey Brothers Funeral Home had her on a train to Greenville for burial per her husband's instructions.

This is an overall view of Hattye's burial spot. On the back side of her marker stands a big cedar tree. It has partly pushed over her 5 foot tall marker, causing it to lean toward the burial spot. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/HattyeMarker5b.jpg 

This a close up of Hattye's marker. Born July 20, 1873 Died April 16, 1900 at 26 years, 9 months and 26 days. "Precious in the sight of the Lord." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/HattyeMarker2.jpg

This is another view of Hattye's marker showing the tree next to it. She is buried on the other side of the marker. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/HattyeMarker3.jpg

This is a view of Hattye's in-law's markers. The small flat one on the left is her father-in-law's Dr. Marshall Marion Chandler. The tall marker on the right is her mother-in-law's marker. The big cedar tree and Hattye's marker is in background. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/HattyeMarker4.jpg 

So far abou 15 people have stepped forward to say they will help. These supports are listed at the end of the 'Bring Hattye Home" webpage. I hope more of you who are reading this will join us. If you can help find any of Hattye's living defendants, let us know. Let's bring Hattye home. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/bringhattyehome.html 

A lady sent me photos of an old bell that used to be on top of the Methodist Church in Roosevelt, Oklahoma (NW of Lawton). The church recently closed down and the bell was moved to the Methodist Church in Snyder, Oklahoma. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/RooseveltBell03.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/RooseveltBellCloseup.jpg http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/SnyderBell03.jpg

Speaking of Snyder, Oklahoma. Here is a photo of the old Snyder High School. My grandfather, Stanley Carmon, was the contractor for the school's construction in the 1930s. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/SnyderHigh03.jpg 

This is the old Douglas High School Gym my grandfather built in this same time period. You can even see the similarities between the one at Snyder and the one here in Ardmore. He built 29 schools all over southern Oklahoma during the depression years of the 30s. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/DouglasGym1930.jpg

A Reader sent me an old pic of the Wirt Franklin Indian statue that used to be at Turner Falls Lookout point. I'm sure someone somewhere has one of the original statues. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/TurnerFallsIndian3a.jpg 

This week a Reader told me about Grindstone Creek just west of Springer, Oklahoma. After learning about this piece of Carter county history, I know there must be a story here, but what it is? I was told that years ago people in the area found old grinding stones used at Indian camps along the creek. Has one every heard about a grind stone Indian camp west of Springer? http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/grindstonemap.jpg

I noticed on my website's hit-o-meter that my lowly persimmon seed photo has received more hits than any other file so far this month. When you have a photo that can be found no where else in the world, the world wants to see! A spoon predicts 'a harsh winter with wet heavy snows'. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/persimmons3b.jpg 

I've been using Ospam for a week now, and it is working flawlessly! It grabs nearly all the spam before it reaches my Outlook express Inbox. It will even filter Hotmail accounts. I haven't lost one "real" email since letting Ospam filter my emails. And best of all, its free! http://www.0spam.com/

Some of you will remember I mentioned a couple of times the past few months about my electricity dimming on and off in the evenings. Guess what? It happened at 1pm last Monday in my neighborhood. Mine and my neighbors electricity was off for nearly one hour Monday. OG&E trucks came out immediately, just down the street, fixing the problem and my lights have not flickered since!

Recorded by Betty Carroll October 25, 1984: "Once upon a time.... you could ride a street car to the old Lorena Park near the present Dornick Hills Club. There was a ball park out there with grandstand seats for about 300. And there were baseball and football games on sunday afternoon, and a picnic area near the lake on the east side of the park. This was around 1907 to 1912, according to an interview Mac McGalliard had with Mattie Aston Cravatt. She also remembered that Dr. Walter Hardy founded the Hardy Sanitarium and started Oklahoma's first airplane ambulance service, lived west of the present 12th Avenue NW and Commerce Street and had a fruit orchard and vineyard. There was a Hill Sanitarium for alcoholics in a big 2 story brown house of 12 to 14 rooms on the corner of West Main and K Street. Dr. Von Keller later built the Von Keller Hospital on the corner of 12th Avenue and Commerce, all here in Ardmore."

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Speaking of the Naval Air Station near Norman, my husband was stationed there in 1945 when he returned from the South Pacific and after WWII. His time was almost up and he was trying to decide if the Navy was going to be his career. Being young and having the desire to travel but on his own the civilian life won out. I didn't meet him until a few years after that but I was living in Ardmore." -Jo Evelyn Barton
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"Butch, as a young girl, I was told that the large mound of dirt you mentioned this week in T&T near Norman, OK, was a firing range when the naval base was there. Don't remember who told me." -Jo (Fronterhouse) Long
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"The T&T is a memorial this week, your friend, the nice banner for the troops, the veterans memorial, Thanksgiving and Hattye and the others you mention at the cemeteries. A very warm and touching issue. God bless you."
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"Butch, what the heck is a human wolf? I never heard of that before." ------------------------------------------------------------------------
"The "Killed By Human Wolves" inscription on Katherine Cross's headstone in Konawa made my hair stand on end. Does anyone know exactly what happened to Ms. Cross?" http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/konawa88.jpg
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"Hello Butch, As usual with your weekly "This and That", some interesting bit of news, history or a photo gets my curiosity going, similar to "Inquiring minds wanna know" and next thing I know I have been on-line for hours searching and researching! LOL! What got me curious this time was a T&T reader's mention of the photo of a tombstone in Oklahoma. The deceased had been murdered by "human wolves". What a statement to engrave on a tombstone! Okay Butch! "Inquiring minds wanna know"! What is that all about?? AND as usual always looking forward to next week's T&T! Good work!"
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"Butch, I love your T&T letters and am so glad that I am on your mailing list. I have Braziel ancestors who lived in Oklahoma Territory in about 1906-08. We have Headen/Haden ancestors who married into our Braziel family just after the Revolutionary War. The name of Haden or Headen has been handed down in every generation of Braziels since that time. I was interested in your story about Dow Braziel and John Thomas Braziel in Vol. 7, issue 343, and appreciate your sending photos of their gravestones in the Rose Hill Cemetery. You did overlook another Braziel headstone in the same plot (#44) as Dow Braziel, and that is the stone for a Robert Haden Braziel (1842-1929). I would like to be in contact with anyone who may have family information to share about this Robert Haden Braziel. Perhaps your reader Shellie Hoffield (Random Acts of Kindness) could take a photo of Robert Haden Braziel's gravestone for me? That would be very kind." -Rochelle in Hot Springs, Arkansas rochelle@cablelynx.com http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/brazielrobert.jpg
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"Butch, I can't believe that picture painted by Hattye Hinkle is over a hundred years old! Looks so fresh. You always come up with such interesting things and stories on your site. I cried when I read that Hattye is all alone out there in Texas. I am reminded of my daughter who died just after she turned 21 and is buried (due to my ex-husband's wishes) two to three hours drive away with no family nearby and because I have not been able to drive for many years due to bad eyesight, I have not been able to visit her grave for quite a while. That hurts. Can't afford to have my daughter reburied where I am, but I hope that Hattye will be able to come home to Ardmore. God bless you for wanting to do something about getting her back to her family."
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"As always I enjoyed this week's T&T, thank you for your extra effort. The article mentioning the Gold Star Mothers caught my attention. Just recently became aware of who these women are and what the name represents. Am sure you know all about them but I have sent along a link to their web page." http://www.goldstarmoms.com/
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"Does anyone know the history on Creek Churches down and around Eufala, Oklahoma? I am also interested in any urban legends and ghost stories from around that area." caitorrie@hotmail.com
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"I am looking for information on the Bank of Hunter/ the first national bank of ok- hunter branch and the ioof hall at Hunter, Oklahoma. all the same building. I know the teller stuff is at the Hall of Fame in OK City... that is about all I can find. I was hopeful to find a picture, article or advertising." vocollins@hotmail.com
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"Butch the artist's name on the mural at Cornish Ford in Healdton says Firquain on it, his Oklahoma City phone is 405-755-4881. Bill has the car in his garage, if you want to see it."
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"Here is a website All GeoCachers should go to and bookmark. the web site owner is a cacher. the site contains map after map after map. stay with it and see all of it. if you want a map source go here. Pass it along to other cachers." http://www.brillig.com/geocaching/maps.shtml
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"Hi Butch, So sorry to hear of the loss of your boss and friend. In regards to the mention you made a couple of weeks ago about the community pool, I worked there for two summers as a lifeguard while I was in high school. I spent many days there just goofing off and trying to work on my tan in addition to the time that I was working, Those were some pretty fun times."
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"Hi Butch, I love your history site about Ardmore...I am interested in Ardmore and Wilson because of the Finley family that lived and worked there...Thomas T. Finley owned a operated a "green grocery" store at 4th Ave. N.E. in Ardmore from the early 1890's until a fire destroyed the store and home there, killing his wife, Lizzie, Lizzie's sister Dora Murphy, Dora's daughter Corrine Murphy, and Lizzie's daughter Mabel Cutts..this happened in Mar. of 1914..all are buried in Rose Hill cemetery..Ardmore..then a daughter and son of Thomas, Minnie and Elmer, were involved in a shooting at the Mobley hotel in Wilson, Minnie was the operator of the hotel and Elmer shot and killed Minnie's son-n-law, Art Watkins in 1926 in the hotel lobby after a fight about Art abusing Minnie and her daughter...just thought that maybe you might have access to or know how to obtain some more information on these events. I have just little articles clipped from papers about it...Thomas T. Finley was my g-g grandfather. I lost track of Minnie and know not where she went after this incident but I see that a Finley family must have been in the area for there to be a cafe and feed and seed store operated by some member of the family. Was hoping that somewhere in your travels you might have a picture of the old hotel or some information about the above stories. any help would be so appreciated. hope to hear from you, thanks so much." -Christie
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Over 800 people filled the First Baptist Church Wednesday at 2:00pm November 19th to show their respect for Carter County Commissioner Joe Dean McReynolds and say goodbye to a man who gave 12 years in public service to the people of this county. Farewell Joe, you'll be missed by many. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/McReynoldsFarewell.jpg  http://ardmoreite.com/stories/111903/obi_McReynolds.shtml 

The following is Ardmore's school song years ago. It was being sung as late as the 40s and maybe even the 1950s at pep rallies and games. I was told it was sung to the music of 'The Grand Old Flag', although I haven't got the words to match the music when I hum it. Does anyone remember?

"A song of Ardmore and her love so true
Comes waiting o're the air
And thrills us through and through.
While the bells of Victory do ring
We'll answer back by rising to sing-
Hail! Ole Ardmore, hurrah, hurrah, hurrah,
Our Alma Mater;thou art loyal, brave and true.
Her spirit guiding as we journey on
We'll always wear the red and white for Old Ardmore.

You may talk about your colleges, Fair Harvard and Old Yale
And all the universities whose banners brave the gale
The azure flag of Cambridge, and Old Oxford Noble Blue
That fly in far off England o'er hearts both brave and true.
Even the sunny shores of Frisco to the distant Portland, Maine,
Away off to the Philippines and away back home again-
No college, university, or school can ever show, so brave, so
True, so great a crew as students that we know.

CHORUS:
For we are jolly students of the Ardmore, Oklahoma Schools
Our colors are red and white.
We wear the emblem of our Alma Mater true-rah-rah-rah-
We're the kind that dare and do.
For we are the jolly students of Ardmore, Oklahoma, schools,
Our colors are red and white.
We wear the emblem of our Alma Mater true, rah-rah-rah-
We're the kind that dare and do."

Have a safe and bountiful Thanksgiving everyone! And see you next Saturday!
http://www.jacquielawson.com/viewcard.asp?code=0183913358

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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Saturday November 15, 2003 T&T Weekly Vol 7 Issue 343

I had a visitor this week with an interesting story. His name is Jeddie Harrison here in Ardmore and he had quite a story to tell. It all started nearly two years ago when Jeddie went to a garage sale here in town and bought a painting. He didn't give much attention to the painting at the time, so he just stored it away. This week he thought about that painting, and remembered some names written on the back of the painting along with the artist's name, so he decided to do some research. He discovered the artist was a Hattye Hinkle Chandler (1874-1900). She painted the picture when she was attending North Texas Female College for art in Sherman, Texas. The best guess is Hattye painted the picture around 1893 or 1894.

Hattye Hinkle married young but because of a lingering illness, the newspapers said she died here in Ardmore at age 26. Her husband, James J. Chandler, sent Hattye's body to Greenville, Texas for burial since he was from that area. James Chandler would later remarry, and through the years his first wife Hattye buried in Greenville, Texas was all but forgotten.

This is a photo of Judge John Hinkle and his wife Mary in the front row. Their three children are behind from left to right: Carra, J. Homer, and Hattye. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/hinkle3.jpg 

This is better photo of Hattye Hinkle as a very young lady. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/HinkleHattye.jpg

What makes this a sad story is all of Hattye's relatives are buried here in Ardmore while she is still buried by herself in Greenville, Texas. Hattye's parents were Ardmore's Federal Judge John Homer Hinkle and Mary Morgan Hinkle. Hattye's parents had already had a burial spot paid for and in her name at Ardmore's Rose Hill Cemetery in the Hinkle burial lots. So the burial spot has been waiting for her 103 years. As a side note, Hinkle Street along the north side of the courthouse is named after the Hinkle family. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/HinkleStreetSW.jpg 

Now let's flash back to school days in Ardmore. Everyone sit up straight in your chairs, look toward the front, don't say a word, and listen carefully: Myself and many of you reading this newsletter has a round-about connection to Hattye Hinkle Chandler. That connection is Marjorie Chandler Goodnight. Thousands of us kids were taught penmanship at Ardmore Junior High by Mrs. Goodnight, as she was a teacher for many years at Ardmore. You see, Mrs. Goodnight (1905-1998) was the granddaughter of Hattye Hinkle Chandler. Here is a picture of Marjorie Goodnight in case some of you have forgotten what that kind, gentle, wonderful teacher looked like. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/GoodnightMarjorie.jpg http://www.ardmoreite.com/stories/020998/obits/obits.html

Right now I don't know what it would take to move Hattye from Greenville, Texas to Ardmore. I'm sure it would take permission from her kin, obtaining a re-burial permits in Texas and Oklahoma, lots of red tape, grave opening and closing costs, transportation costs, etc. But I do believe there are enough of us dyed-in-the-wool Ardmoreites who would like to see Hattye Hinkle brought to Ardmore from that lonely grave in Greenville, Texas and buried with her family members at Rose Hill Cemetery. She has been at Greenville since 1900. If you would like for me to pursue this further, let me know. One man ion Ardmore said when he learned of this, he broke down and cried, knowing she has been buried at Greenville all these years, all alone. Two or three people have already told me they will help. Can we bring Hattye Hinkle home?

I have set up a webpage to keep track of the Bring Hattye Home effort. Those who would like to support me and others in this effort, send me an email. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/bringhattyehome.html

And finally what brought all this about the past few days is this 1893 painting by Hattye Hinkle which is now owned by Jeddie Harrison of Ardmore. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/HinklePainting.jpg 

A Reader called me this week and said there was a bell east of Ardmore near Springdale Road that would soon be in Dallas because its owner was moving there. So everyone knows me, I rushed out there and boy what a find! It's an 1886 design, but not a 1886 bell. They are not sure where it came from. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/SpringDaleRdBell2.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/SpringDaleRdBell4.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/SpringDaleRdBell3.jpg 

Here is what Carl Zimmerman in St Louis had to say about the above bell:

"Interesting! As usual with C.S. Bell stuff, "1886" is not the year when the bell was made, but the year the pattern was redesigned (I think). The only other date that's ever been seen is 1889, and I think that may be a typo for 1886. So the bell is probably somewhat younger than 1886. Anyway, this bell is a Size 1, which is the smallest made. That's probably why the lettering (especially the 1886) appears so large with respect to the size of the yoke. Most unusual is picture 4, which shows a small word just above the bracket on the base. I guess it says "upright", but it took me a while to figure that out."

And this will take some of you back in time. Sitting right next to that bell southeast of Ardmore was this old wood stove. The lifting handle is still laying on top. The legs/base to the stove is not under the stove, but sitting off to the side out of the picture. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/SpringDaleRdStove2.jpg 

I was at the Rose Hill Cemetery this week and just a few feet west of the Main Gate I saw the name Braziel. So I stop, and sure enough, it was the marker of Dow Braziel. Most of you will remember the story on Dow Braziel. He was shot and killed at the California Cafe in 1919 by Deputy Sheriff Bud Ballew. Next to Dow was John Thomas Braziel. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/BrazielDowMarker.jpg

This is a photo of U.S. Marshal Dow Braziel. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/BrazielDow.jpg 

John Braziel killed two men in 1907 names of Cook and Simms. He was sentence to life in prison at McAlester in 1908. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/BrazielJohnThomas.jpg 

From Nov 4, 2000 T&T:
"Yesterday I received a package from Del City. It was a rare photo of the Braziel brothers along with five others in the photo. The photo belonged to Bill Moncrief's grandmother who recently died at age 104. His grandmother used to tell Bill how Bob and Dow Braziel would come over to her house when a child dressed in the same uniforms. Dow Braziel died looking down the gun barrel of Carter County Deputy Bud Ballew in 1919 at the California Cafe here in Ardmore. The Dow brothers were partners in the cafe, which was located on the corner where Stolfa Brothers Hardware is presently located. In the photo Robert H. "Bob" Braziel is the man at top left. His brother Dow is the second top left. Both are in dark suits. Bill Moncrief believes the man at the lower bottom right, is John "Buck" Garrett." http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/BrazielBros.jpg 

This is the Braziel Family Marker http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/BrazielFamilyMarker.jpg 

Just a few feet north of Dow Braziel's marker is where Con Keirsey and his wife are buried. Con Keirsey was the first and only deputy sheriff of Carter county who lost his life in the line of duty. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/KeirseyConVella.jpg

William Oscar Alexander was a "special Officer" killed in 1916 when he and others stopped a load of illegal whiskey SE of Ardmore at Hoxbar. Along with Alexander was U.S. Marshal Dow Braziel. Leaning up against William Oscar Alexander's tombstone lay a marker that caught my attention. It was a Hardeman lady and read:
Here lies one who in this life,
Was a kind mother, a true wife,
She was by many virtues blest,
And Piety among the best.
http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/OneTrueWife.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/OneTrueWife2.jpg

Not knowing what piety meant I looked it up: 1. the quality or state of being pious: as a. fidelity to natural obligations (as to parents) b. dutifulness in religion. http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=piety

In Healdton, Oklahoma on the side of the Cornish Motor Company building is a beautiful mural. I do not know who painted the mural, but it is a work of art. Its a picture of a 1915 Model 'T' Ford. Maybe someone in the Healdton area will let us know who the artist is. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/1915HealdtonFord2.jpg

A Reader sent me photos of an old bell in Handley, Texas. Handley, Texas is just a piece of history today. In 1946 it was annexed into Ft Worth. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/handleybell2.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/handleybell3.jpg 

I found what seems like an excellent Free web based anti-spam program this week. It has worked even better than the n-dreams.com I talked about a couple of months ago. Like n-dream.com Ospam using a verification process. Plus you can Add emails of your friends or you Address Book to a whitelist so they don't have to Verify they are a real person sending the email and not a robot. I suggest you to to their Support Page first and read about how Ospam works. http://www.0spam.com/

Recorded by Betty Carroll October 25, 1984: "Once upon a time.... try to imagine Turner Falls and the Honey Creek canyon as the scene must have looked thousands of years ago. The stream and the cascade of the falls probably would have looked much as they do now. There would be camps or villages of pre-historic people. Some of these people at some time lived in a wonderful cave in cliffs above the falls. There is a room about 15 to 20 feet across, there a natural window in the sheer face of the cliff for a lookout down the canyon, a small opening in the rock of the roof provides a chimney, and the entrance opens in the cliff so it can be reached fairly easily but would be easy to defend against animals or other men. The ceiling of this cave is blackened by layers of soot from the ancient fires. It is easy to see why these people would have been attracted to the Turner Falls area with the springs of pure water, the canyons and cliffs and caves providing natural shelter. There would have been an abundance of wild game and fish for food. I'll be thinking of those ancient peoples and looking around for signs of them when I go up there next time."

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"That is such a great photo of the big dirt mound in Norman. I have lived in Wichita Kansas for seven years and every time I drive back through Norman on my way home I look at that hill, which I have looked at since I was in high school in the 80s and I have wondered why it is there.. how it got there, how long it has been there etc. I have seen signs on it and trees on it and a few weeks ago there was a sheet with OU letters on it. I never drive by it without giving it though. I've always thought this was a weird quirk of mine. I mean how many people even give a dirt mound a second thought? So I was very excited to see something come through the list about the hill. Now I want to know more!!!"
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"Butch: I know "the big dirt mound at Norman, Oklahoma" very well. I watched them build it in early 1942. We lived on a farm a few miles southwest of Moore, population 499. WW II had just started. I was 14 years old. We could see "the big dirt mound" grow daily. We wondered what it was. They were busy building the Naval Air Training Station north of Norman. We knew it had something to do with the Navy Base but could not imagine what it was for. At the time there was no IH-35, just the interurban tracks from Oklahoma City to Norman. Highway 77 then was a couple of miles east of "the mound". It was much later that we learned it was a firing range for the Navy and "the dirt mound" served as the backstop for the lead bullets. Moore was only about three miles north. I wonder how many rounds went over the mound and fell somewhere around Moore. The Navy took the 320-acre farm across the road from our farm on what is now Santa Fe. It was already fairly flat and they made it into a landing strip for the Navy pilot trainees to practice doing touch and go landings in their yellow Stearman PT-17 open cockpit biplanes. I remember there being as many as twenty or thirty of them at a time flying around and around from daylight to dark practicing touch and go landings. It wasn't very long until one of them smacked into the ground. My dad jumped into the 1929 Windsor and went tearing across the landing strip to rescue the pilot while I ran a quarter of a mile to the nearest neighbor who had a telephone to call the Naval Station. This happened twice more before the Navy built a crash and aid station at the north end. A lot of the WW II Navy pilots trained on that landing strip. A few years later I enlisted and served in the Army Paratroopers." -Don Davidson, Brenham, Texas.
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"Butch, re: the statue of the Indian. There is a car dealership in San Antonio that has a humongous Indian statue in front of their lot. They used to be on Broadway close to downtown SA but they moved several years ago to Loop 410. Next time I go to SA I'll go over and take a pic for you."
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"That mound of dirt at Norman, OK is called Mt. Williams by the Navy guys who trained at the Naval Air Technical Training Center. At Norman there was a north base and a south base used during WWII and the south base was closed in 1959. My dad, Buck West, and my husband, Dale Wise, both trained at that base many years apart." -C Wise, Kingston, OK
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"The mound used to look the same on both ends, sloping down to the ground. The western end was sliced off almost vertically when they built I-35." http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/normanhill.jpg
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"The mounds at The Norman Airport were used for sighting in guns on aircraft when that was U.S.Navy North Field. The main naval base was S.W. of town about two blocks of the college stadium,which wsa given to them when the base close in the 50's." ------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Butch: When I attended OU after WW2 I was told that Norman had a north Naval Base and also a south Naval Base. I had classes in buildings on the north base, the south base and the regular main OU campus. I have always thought this firing range was for the Navy, not the Army, maybe I have not been properly informed. Also, In more recent times I believe they considered moving the dirt away but realized there could still be some live armament present and reconsidered, before taking the risk."
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"I admit that I'm sort of enthralled by the Brown's Spring saga, but why is there no mention of the origin of the placename? Has anyone done any digging (excuse the term) to find out who the area and cemetery are named after? I have wandered down that little road from the smoke shop just to see where it went but stopped short of the springs. Don't remember if I felt a little spooked or not. I suspect it just didn't seem like a good idea at the time. I'm curious to know what old data you might have about the Simon, Hickory and Burneyville areas. I'm trying to put together some family tree information about a few families named GOODWIN, HILL, WALKER, LINDSEY and MOORE. Many from this extended family are buried in the Simon and Lakeview cemeteries but there are people missing! Especially from the Moore line in the Burneyville area." lhead@netexas.net
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"Is anyone going to offer any persimmons for sale? I just had a very wonderful 70th birthday party and haven't had persimmons for a long time. When I was a kid (1938-1948) we went to Poteau, OK for a week at Thanksgiving time to visit with my grandfather. We always got some wild persimmons and most of the time they were ripe. Sometimes we got the ones that would make your mouth pucker. I would like to get some wild persimmons?" -Ted Edwards tebear@air-internet.com
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"Hey Butch & Sweatpea, Liked the picture of the pin from the swimming pool. I remember all that learned swim there in 1963 Really brings back a lot of good memories. Fact my last trip to the pool in 64 at the age of 14 resulted in First degree burns and I ended up in the hospital. Since then I have stayed out of the son."
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"As usual I am reading and enjoying the newsletter tonight. That was good to see the old Ardmore Hotel. My sister, Jackie worked there as a top waitress when I was just a kid. It was a fine Hotel! I looked at the lost pictures too and the one by Jack Patrick, Deventer, The Netherlands, the sign reading Trois Ponts the man seems to be photographing says "Three Bridges" according to my French husband. Oh, and the P-nut harvest last week was interesting too. I never knew it so good. What I remember is shaking them by hand and piling them in a windrow? for drying. By evening or quitting time, I had more dirt on me than the pnuts ever had. lol Looking forward to next issue. This gets better all the time. I am just one of so many who appreciate your hard work." -Nellie Combe
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"Butch, I am a volunteer for Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness. I take photos of Carter County cemetery headstones for genealogists around the nation. Lately, there has been a boom in genealogy interest, I suppose, and I have been inundated with requests. I am looking for more volunteers for Carter County, Oklahoma, to help me out with these requests. I use Bill Hamm's cemetery index http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/ok/carter/cartercm.htm to locate which cemetery a person is buried. (His work has been invaluable). I locate the plot of the grave using books in the Chickasaw Library for the smaller cemeteries (published by local genealogical societies); if the grave is in Rose Hill or Hillcrest, all I have to do is call and they can bring up the name on their database and give me the location. Once I locate the grave, I take a photo with my digital camera and email to the requestor. If any T & T readers would like to help me (along with Ruth Bellamy) with Carter County (please, there are over 70 cemeteries here!), you can sign up through http://www.raogk.org . Volunteers are needed all over Oklahoma as well as the country, so please sign up to help out with the county in which you live. You can ask to be reimbursed for your expenses. Thanks so much!" -Shellie Hoffield
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"I have created a website that locates America's Military Memorials and Military Museums by city and state. The information is FREE OF CHARGE to everyone. The Smithsonian Institute provided the initial data for the guide. Folks from all over the nation send in locations or suggest corrections on the list. If your municipality or county has military monuments that honor veterans of World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm and Iraq, I would be glad to enter them in the guide. In order for tourists to locate the exact site, it is most helpful to include cross streets. You may check to see if your memorials are listed on my website. I am 75 and a retired school administrator and my wife and I live on a farm in North Carolina. I deeply appreciate your assistance with my project." Donald B. Conrad, 48 Carriage Lane, Piney Creek, North Carolina 28663. 1-336-372-4454 http://web.infoave.net/~donbarb54/
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"Dwane Stevens' photos and description of Central Power Units reminded me of growing up in the Samedan Oil District#1 camp, just up the road from the old Cannon School. There were several "powers" , as we called them, all over those hills, but one of the largest was less than a quarter of a mile behind our house. The natural gas engines that ran those units were very loud and had a distinctive rhythm. Once, around 2:00 a.m., everyone in the house woke up at the same time. We had no idea why, until we noticed neighbor's lights on, too. We went out into the yard and saw most of the folks in the camp just looking at each other, trying to figure out what was going on, when someone noticed how quiet it was. The power unit had stopped. We were all so used to the rhythmic sounds that we had been awakened by silence. That is one of my most vivid memories of growing up in Carter County in the 50's. Thanks to Dwane for the photos. The last time I was at the Permian Basin Petroleum Museum in Midland, Texas, they had moved an old power unit onto the grounds and had a few rod lines to show how they worked." -Chuck http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/cannonschoolmap.jpg  http://community.webshots.com/photo/16560143/16809105cyPJnObNsn
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"I was trying to view this photo, but I couldn't. Is there any chance that you could email it to me? It is the one about human wolves in the Konawa, Oklahoma cemetery." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/konawa88.jpg
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"Butch, Organizers of the annual Veteran's Day observance at the Oklahoma Veteran's Center were rewarded with great weather and a large, attentative audience. Many of the veterans at the Center were assembled in wheel chairs and chairs on the lawn near the ceremony. The audience was sprinkled with the faces of the old, middle-age and young soldiers of the recent wars. An uplifting speech by Norman A. Lamb, Cabinet Secretary,Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs emphasized the blessings of being an American with material things many of the world can only dream about. With many of their group in Iraq, the Army Reserve 910th Quartermaster Co. presented and retired the colors. Missing this year was the 21-gun salute due to a lack of 910th personnel. The Davis High School band, directed by Kern Farve, presented music for the occasion. Troop 39 Boy Scouts participated in the ceremony as did M/Sgt. Kent Tucker (retired), Jared Pollard, Gold Star Mothers and Pastor Frank Young. Gary Robertson, center administrator, acted as moderator. The observance is supported annually by American Legion Posts 65 and 264, Carter County Military Memorial Museum, VFW Post 4865, Marine Corps League, Disabled American Veterans Chapter 30, and the 345th Support Battalion, Oklahoma National Guard. Wal-Mart personnel were recognized for their support of the program. A few pictures of the ceremony are included." -Gary Simmons http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/Vetdaydavisbandvets03.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/VetDaycrowd03.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/Veterans111103.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/vetdayspeakcrowd03.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/Veteransday111103.jpg

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It is with a sad heart I write this issue of T&T. I've struggled with getting it finished all week since learning my boss had a massive heart attack earlier in the week. I would come home in the evenings and just didn't have it in me to write, but I knew many of you would be waiting for this newsletter. Most of you know I work for the Carter County Commissioners Office taking care of the computer networks of county government. My office is by Commissioner Joe McReynold's office and when you work with someone on a day-to-day basis you get to know them very well. Joe was like a father figure to me, someone I could go to when I needed help with something, and he always did what he could. Many days Joe would come in to the office from the District 1 County Barn around 4:00pm. I would be in my office, and he always took a minute to stop, and ask me how things were going. Joe McReynolds was one of those kind of people that was never to busy for a friend. Joe passed away around 4:00pm Friday November 14th, never recovering from that heart attack. He will be dearly missed by many. He was a true friend through the years, and I want to dedicate this issue of T&T to him. We'll miss you Joe. http://www.brightok.net/cartercounty/CommissionerJoeMcReynolds.html

Doug Williams and I would like to thank those of you who made possible the new "Welcome Home" banner that is now in place on a billboard by the armory building at the north edge of Ardmore. I knew we could do it! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/NotForgottenBillboard.jpg

In 1558 three of my Carmon ancestors were burned at the stake in Norwich, England for practicing their Puritan beliefs contrary to the Church of England. Finally in 1633 their decendants, my ancestors, left England and settled on 120,000 acres in Hampstead on New York Island. 370 years later here I am in Ardmore, Oklahoma enjoying freedom that came at a price. Even today a high price is being paid by many so you and I can enjoy turkey, dressing and giblet gravy in a few days. But its more than that. I hope we all take time to give thanks next week and being able to live in a land of freedom.

"Come, ye thankful people, come, raise the song of harvest home;
All is safely gathered in, ere the winter storms begin.
God our Maker doth provide for our wants to be supplied;
Come to God's own temple, come, raise the song of harvest home."

Written by Henry Alford, 1844
http://www.cyberhymnal.org/htm/c/o/comeytpc.htm
http://www.cyberhymnal.org/bio/a/l/alford_h.htm

See everyone next Saturday.

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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Saturday November 8, 2003 T&T Weekly Vol 7 Issue 342

Last week we talked about the persimmon seed as a weather predictor. It looks like the persimmon is proving to be a correct forecaster of Oklahoma's weather the past few days. Temperatures have dropped down in the 20s and 30s in many areas after being in the 80s and 90s a week or so ago. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/persimmons3b.jpg

Here is a 1942 photo of the old Ardmore Hotel. It was later modernized into the present day bank building at "C" and West main. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/ardhotel1942.jpg

Back in the early 70s I took a photo with a 35mm camera of the "big dirt mound" at Norman, Oklahoma. This is the hill that was used for shooting practice by the navy in WWII. I've heard there used to be and probably still is lead bullets in that mound. I can't find the original photo right know, but I should have it by the next T&T. Then we can get a real closeup! This mound of dirt is right along the east side of I-35. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/normanhill.jpg

I received a call this week from a lady in Snyder, Oklahoma. She is sending me photos of the old Methodist Church bell that was originally in Roosevelt, Oklahoma just north of Snyder. Not long ago the bell was moved to Snyder, Oklahoma and placed on display. When I get the photos I'll let everyone see this 100+ year bell.

I remember as a kid in the early 60s the building of what we called the "big swimming pool" at 3rd and F Street NE just west of my grandfather Carmon's lumber yard. (The correct name is Community Swimming Pool.) I'd ride my bicycle up to the site and watch that bulldozer dig what I thought was the deepest hole in the whole world. When we wore our street clothes to the pool, we'd go into the dressing room and change into a bathing suit. Our street clothes where put in a wire basket and a big safety pin with a number on it was given to us. The number on the safety pin matched the number on the wire basket. We would attached the pin to our bathing suit, and se it to get our wire basket when we were ready to leave. Here is one of those big safety pins with the number 37 on it from the 1960s that I just happen to have! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/poolpin65.jpg

Once in a while I take a photo with my Olympus digital camera that turns out good for an amateur. Here's a photo I took that I'm proud of...... proud its being used on an historical website of locomotives! http://test.steamlocomotive.info/vlocomotive.cfm?Display=956

Speaking of photos I counted all the pixs I have in several Folders on my computer and came up with 5,634. That's a lot of photos. I'm sure glad I have a CD burner in case my hard drive crashes!

Back in the 1920s and 30s Wirt Franklin Oil established filling stations in Ardmore and other areas. The well known and recognized landmark in front of each station was a statue of an Indian brave holding up his left hand in friendship. This photo is a good closeup of the Wirt Franklin Station and Palacine Oil along with the Indian statue. I wonder if there is a statue still in existance somewhere? http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/palacinestation.jpg

Criner Hills: A small group of hills southwest of Ardmore is known as Criner Hills. They were named after the earliest resident of the hills, John B. Criner. John was born in Sherman, Texas in 1859 and the family moved in 1860 to Indian Territory. John made the hills his headquarters for various ranches he operated at Thackerville, Tatums, and Brock. He was one of the first settlers south of the Arbuckles and lived for 98 years, witnessing the tremendous growth of the area he pioneered. He died at his home in the Criner Hills in July 1948. -from Paul Frame's 'History of Ardmore'

TimeTales is a collection of found photographs. Found at fleamarkets, thriftshops, some are scooped up from streets and alleyways, fallen from an overstuffed bag or torn pocket. Others turn up in a cabinet's hidden compartment, found while wandering the rooms of an abandoned house. Now the photos exist by themselves, lost in time. Time Tales does not want to reveal their mysteries. Time Tales asks to be the new home for lost photos, a resting place, for the nameless and the lost. http://www.TimeTales.com/

I still get calls and emails and hear stories about people losing everything because of a virus on their computer. I created a webpage two years ago to help the novice computer user with this ever growing problem. I updated it this week so maybe it will help with the popups too by using a program called FreeSurfer. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/virushelp.html

I know there are T&T Readers who have emailed the Number 1 historian of Healdton about local history in that area after he's posted an email in the Mailbag. I received an email this week from Kenneth Eck letting me know he has jumped into the fastlane and broadband internet. His new email address is kenlorek@cablerocket.com

Recorded by Betty Carroll October 2, 1984: "Once upon a time.... its hard to believe 14 different flags have flown over all or part of Oklahoma. I certainly didn't know what they were until I read the list in one of Mac McGalliard's Reporter's Notebook columns. Here's the list: Spain twice, England, France, French Tricolor, striped U.S. Flag, U.S. Flag with 13 stripes, and 20 stars, Mexican Flag, Texas Flag, Choctaw Flag, Texas Lone Star Flag, Oklahoma's First State Flag, Present Oklahoma State Flag, the Present U.S. Flag. We overlook the fact sometimes that Oklahoma has a richer historical heritage than most states. Here in Southern Oklahoma, was a land of cowboys and Indians, outlaws, stage coaches and covered wagons to match the drama and excitement of any area. We have historic sites and trails, and stories and legends with heroes and villians, to learn about, enjoy and be proud of."

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"This is a picture of the Cornish Orphan's home burning in 1917. The picture belonged to my grandmother, Tommie Taylor Hall." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/cornishfire1917.jpg
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"Hi Butch, Enjoy reading your This & That letter. I would like to know more about the Simpson community which is located east of Durwood, OK. My Dad attended school there in the early 1920s. Maybe one of your Readers could tell me when the town was formed as well as it's history. Thanks." -Barbara Bwallace63@aol.com
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"My grandfather, Lamar Howell and my grandmother, Inez Howell, used to spend every Saturday at the Cornish Children's Home. They would go there and my grandfather would give all the boys a haircut and help them to get ready for church the following day. My grandmother would help all the girls wash and roll their hair and help them to lay out their Sunday clothes. When my mother, Janet Shockley, was in grade school, her class saved all their pennies and then put them in a bubble gum bucket and when the bucket got full, their teacher went out and bought the Cornish Children's Home a record player because they had lost theirs in the fire." -Tonya Rangel
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"As a Girl Scout in the sixty's we took a camping trip to Devil's Den and the place has always remained with me. However until I found your pictures on the Web I had decided perhaps it was just imagination!" -Dallas, Texas
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"Butch, Thanks for all you are doing to preserve the history in and around Ardmore. I faithfully follow your This N' That newsletters and from time to time I send you stuff by email. Our AHS Class of 1963 reunion in Ardmore last month was a great success and many of the participants spoke of you and the pictures and anecdotal items you have so graciously shared with us. Please inform me how to obtain a copy of the video or DVD about the CCC 1936 documentary. My dad worked there at Lake Murray in 1936. We still have his CCC discharge papers showing that he "left to make better of himself (get married)." He would get a kick out of viewing such a film. He is 89 years old and still lives in Ardmore near the Emmanuel Baptist Church. Keep up the great work, there are hundreds of us out here that deeply appreciate and enjoy the fruits of your labor!" -Dennis Medrick, Irving, Texas
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"Sue, Your aunts [Mamie Ellis Harris and Prebble Ellis Thompson] taught at EavesCity in 1933. Pat Allen has a picture of Mamie, Mother and Pat on the front steps of the school. Your aunt Nell will have alot of info." -David K. Thompson, Bakersfield, Ca
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"Butch, Just recently found and read your T&T column. I realize this is not a genealogy site but since there has been so much information regarding Indian Territory, particularly that area which is now Jefferson and Custer Counties. I wonder if you, or any of your readers might know of a man named George R. Tucker who reportedly had a varied and colorful career in the northern area of Texas as a U.S. Marshall, was a lawman in Spanish Fort, TX, a law enforcement officer in Ardmore, Healdton, Possibly Ringling, and chief of police in Waurika. My reason for this inquiry is that my Grandfather's Sister, Martha Ellen Chapman married a George R. Tucker in Hill County, TX, Nov. 1, 1877. Several folks, including those that are definitely related to George Tucker, are researching this individual and the Tucker Family. Unfortunately there were so many Tucker Families in that part of Indian Territory around the 1880 - 1900's, and since we have found no documented record of George R. Tuckers first wife I was hoping someone would have some information on this family. Thanks." -Glen Hamilton
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"Butch, My Dad (Carl W. Stevens) and I have been shooting some photos in the oil patch around Healdton, Wilson and Ringling and just thought your readers might like to see a few. The photo titled "Oil Boom Relics" is an old abandoned oil well with the pipe broken over and the rod still in it. This one is very old as the rod grip connection indicates it originally had a rod line type pump jack possibly produced by "Oklahoma Pump Jack." These jacks were operated by rod lines from a power house containing an engine driving a large band wheel. An eccentric assembly under the band wheel in turn pulled the rod lines back and forth operating the pump jack. The power house was normally located in the middle of a group of wells operating a number of them from one engine. These rod line systems were still all over the place around Healdton when I was a kid. The photo titled "Power House" shows an old abandoned power house still sitting in it's original location that once powered several rod line wells. The engine was located in the end closest in the photo while the band wheel was located in the larger section toward the back. The rod lines radiated out in all directions through slots in the lower part of the building near ground level This would be from the widened part of the building seen toward the back end Not many of these left now days." -Dwane Stevens http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/OilBoomRelics3a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/OilBoomRelics3b.jpg
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"The dream of a lake, later to be known as Lake Murray, had been created, but it was only a dream. Dreams without follow-through are just that, dreams. Projects can remain in the file folders for a lifetime, and that is all they are, just projects. Tomlinson, Milner, and Guthrey did not let this potential project remain only a dream. They got both the State and Federal governments involved, and brought them to Carter and Love Counties. They called former State Senator (1912-20) Fred Tucker, an oil man from Ardmore, and explained the idea of the lake to him. State Senator (1933-35) Louis Fischl of Ardmore authored Senate bill 382, which gave the State Board of Affairs authority to condemn and buy the land for Oklahoma's first state park. The bill was supported in the Oklahoma House of Representatives by Floor Leader of the 14th Legislature, Representative (1931-33) John Steel Batson, of Marietta. The bill was passed in 1933 and the land (with minerals) was purchased for $90,000. Governor (1931-35) William H. "Alfalfa Bill" Murray, a brilliant man, was not in favor of this project. Later, however, when the name was changed from Arbuckle Lake to Lake Murray, he agreed to lend his support to the construction plan. In 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected President of the United States. The country was in a deep economic depression. Very few people had any money, and there were no jobs to be found. Bread lines literally were miles long. Dr. Tomlinson and his team agreed that something must be done to help the unemployed in Oklahoma. The federal government had formed the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) and the WPA (Work Projects Administration). These government agencies employed people to perform useful work on building projects in communities. The Lake Murray project seemed ideal for these programs and was submitted for federal evaluation. Approval was granted, and work on the lake began in July 1933. Members of the CCC cleared the trees and the area; members of the WPA built the dam. There was no power equipment, only teams, wagons, and hand tools. A total of 10,000 men who had been on relief shared the jobs. Each man worked five days, for $1.80 per day. The wages for one day of work provided food for a work week. The balance was enough to feed a man's family for about one month. A group of approximately 1,000 men would work for a week, and then another group would relieve them. A federal relief fund of $20,000 per month ($5,000 per month, each, from Carter, Lover, Johnston, and Marshall Counties) kept 2,200 families from starving. Progress was made." http://www.oklahomabedandberth.com/lakemurray.php
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"Dear Butch, My mother and her family moved to Ardmore in 1921 when she was about a year old. Ardmore is full of history and family history for us. I LOVE Ardmore! My dad worked for Oklahoma Natural Gas Co., and transferred to Tulsa in 1949. But we visited Ardmore very often and I still do! A friend gave me your website address and I am delighted to have found you! I am very, very interested in receiving your weekly newsletter. Please add us to your list. Thanks. -MaryAnn Robb VanVeen (Grandmothers: Minnie A. Hicks and Cecile Hendon)
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"Hi there Butch. I need to get in touch with the folks at the Ardmore tag agency. Need to see what all they require to change the title of My dads car so I can bring it to Texas. Think you could find that number and email it to me. Would really appreciate it." Hardey Tag Agency, 2001 Veterans Blvd, Ardmore, OK 73401, PH: 580-223-8664
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"I loved to read all about them peanuts last week, something else I had no idea at all they were harvested like that not a clue what an eye opener... No farms like that in this country... Thankyou for educating me yet again."
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"Last week Mike Carr sent the picture of Sulphur looking west down Muskogee Avenue. As he said there on the the right is the old Artesian Hotel. But I am sure that it burned in later part of 1961 or very early 1962. I have noticed in a lot of papers or books about Sulphur there are varying dates when it actually burned. The gray building on the left is the old Delay hospital I do not know if it was ever called anything but that. There was a doctor in Sulphur by the name of Delay. I do not know when the building was leveled. It was still in business in the 1940s and 1950s." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/delayhosp.jpg
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"Hi, Butch. I hope that some of your readers may be able to furnish details on this picture sent to me by friend, Bill Thomas, who grew up in Sulphur....Would love to know just where this store was and who ran it then! I grew up in Davis and it is very dear to me. I invite everyone with info to write to me." mornsidemtn@sbcglobal.net  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/generalstore1908.jpg
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"In 1983 Patty Norton and Layton Sutton compiled and published a book called "Indian Territory and Carter County Pioneers, Vol. 1." Copies of this book should be in local libraries and might well have useful information for many searchers. The planned second volume was never completed due to Patty's illness and death. In 1962 Julia Sparger wrote a treatise called "Young Ardmore". (Mrs. Sparger was a teacher in the local school system. She was the English instructor during my senior year at AHS.) The Daily Ardmoreite published it as a supplement July 25, 1993. I would hope that this is also available in libraries as it has much useful information on local history. Perhaps we could persuade the Ardmoreite to run a reprint." -Elizabeth Dyer
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"I recently ran across a reference to a book by Paul Frame entitled HISTORY OF ARDMORE, OKLAHOMA, FROM THE EARLIEST BEGINNINGS TO 1907. I searched all the web sites which I use to locate and purchase used books, but, not surprisingly, no copies were available. I have no idea when it was published but I imagine it has been out of print and probably our of copyright for some time. I wonder if you know of anyone who owns a copy and would be willing to copy it for me. I would be happy to pay for the copy." tomwatson@bellsouth.net
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"Guess you are tired of hearing about persimmons but the ones in Tahlequah have spoons in them too. Today my son-in-law was listening to K-Love and a lady called in and began talking about persimmons. He didn't know why and did not hear the first of the conversation but told the Dj that inside the persimmon seeds was either a shovel, a pitch-fork, or a knife. The shovel meant lots of snow that you would be shoveling, the knife meant a cutting cold, icy winter and he didn't know what the pitchfork meant! It will be interesting what you will hear for your T&T this week."
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"Reminder: The Big Canyon Photo Session is this weekend, Nov 7th and 8th, Saturday and Sunday. Weather could go either way but I'll be there regardless. If anyone needs a map with directions let me know and I'll email one. Remember, you never know about Oklahoma weather. During the last spring session it was raining when everyone arrived but within about an hour or so it cleared off completely and we had a beautiful day of shooting. So far we have never been rained out during a session so keep your fingers crossed and maybe our luck will hold once again!" -Dwane Stevens onmp@juno.com
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"Hi Butch, I admit that I'm sort of enthralled by the Brown's Spring saga. But why is there no mention of the origin of the placename? Has anyone done any digging (excuse the term) to find out who the area and cemetery are named after? I have wandered down that little road from the smoke shop just to see where it went but stopped short of the springs. Don't remember if I felt a little spooked or not. I suspect it just didn't seem like a good idea at the time."
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"Butch, I remember a motel on the east side of the highway back in the 50's......I thought that was the Tower Motel. Seems like it was just brush and trees where the Nichols store is now......and wasn't the drive-in where the OLD Wal-Mart was? Just wondering... Sure enjoy T&T!"
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I'm still learning how to use all the features of my new DVD-R/+R burner. A couple of days ago I ordered 25 blank DVD-Rs from a place in California along with clamshells to protect them. They should be here next week. Here is one of the first DVDs I created using the original DVD Doyle Williams made converting it over from VHS of the 1936 Charles Lynch Movie of construction at Lake Murray. More next week! http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/LynchMovieDVD.jpg http://www.meritline.com/

YOU'VE LOST THAT LOVING FEELING - The Righteous Brothers 1965

"You've lost that loving feeling
Oh that loving feeling
Bring back that loving feeling
Now it's gone gone gone
And I can't go on
No-oh-oh

Baby baby I get down on my knees for you
If you would only love me like you used to do
We had a love
A love a love you don't find every day
So don't...don't...don't let it slip away."

11/05/03: Bobby Hatfield of the Righteous Brothers has died at the age of 63.
http://www.gulf-daily-news.com/Articles.asp?Article=66124&Sn=WORL http://www.righteousbrothers.com/

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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Saturday November 1, 2003 T&T Weekly Vol 7 Issue 341

I was down at Thackerville, Oklahoma last Sunday afternoon picking up some peanuts. I was at the Anthony Reed's farm and found out he is a former Love County Commissioner. He was a great guy, showing me around the farm and all the equipment and how it works in peanut farming. His dad bought the 350 acres back in the 30s just north of Thackerville, and its been in his family ever since. This first two photos is of "digger". Back in the 60s this peanut machine it was called the "digger/shaker/inverter". Thats because it does three things with the peanuts. Digs them up from the ground, shakes the sand away from the peanut roots, and then inverts them as they fall back on the ground so the peanuts are up and the roots are underneat, ready for the peanut harvester when it comes along later. Here is a couple of pixs of the "digger". http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/thackervillepeanuts01.jpg

This is where the just dug peanuts fall from the "shaker" and are inverted or turned over just before falling back to the ground. This inverting gets the peanuts and roots faceup, ready for the harvester when it comes along later. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/thackervillepeanuts02.jpg 

This is one of 25 "bins" Mr. Reed has to hold the peanuts. You can see the opening near the bottom where he attaches the peanut blower/dryer. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/thackervillepeanuts03.jpg 

This is the electric ran dryers. Propane is used to dry the peanuts. It take around 8 hours to a day to dry the peanuts. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/thackervillepeanuts04.jpg 

This is the new peice of equipment Mr. Reed recently installed. The peants are poured through this cattle guard looking thingy, on to a conveyor belt, and sent up to the spout where they drop of into the semi trailer trucks for transport out. This year since the Marietta mill stopped buying peanuts, Mr. Reed has been selling his peanuts to a buyer in Anadarko, Oklahoma. That company sends their trucks down to Thackerville to pickup Mr. Reed's peanuts, he doesnt even have to transport them. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/thackervillepeanuts05.jpg

This is the beginning of the conveyer chute. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/thackervillepeanuts06.jpg 

This is the end of the chute where the peanuts will fall off into the awaiting truck. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/thackervillepeanuts07.jpg

Here's an intesting part. This is where the tailend green "bin" is stopped on the cattle guard looking thingy, and the front end of the bin is hydralically lifted way up, so the peanuts pour out that back and fall in to the conveyor belt trough. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/thackervillepeanuts08.jpg

This is a couple of pixs of the peanut harvester. It follows the "digger". It pulls the peanuts from their roots and readys them for the bin thats following. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/thackervillepeanuts09.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/thackervillepeanuts10.jpg

This is a pic of the peanut crop ready for harvest. You can see Mr. Reed uses what is called a Pivot Watering System. The water comes from wells on the property. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/thackervillepeanuts11.jpg

This is the peanuts Mr. Reed pulled up by hand, and turned so we can see how they are rooted in the dry very sandy soil. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/thackervillepeanuts12.jpg 

This is a close-up of the peanuts and root system. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/thackervillepeanuts13.jpg 

I need to back up here just a little bit. Two weeks ago in the Mailbag a Reader mentioned that the Tower Motel and Restaurant was by the present day Walmart on North Commerce. The Tower Motel was on North Commerce, but it was located where the present day Nichols Supermarted is now. It was the Corral Motel and restaurant that was located where Walmart is located today. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/towermotel3.jpg 

A Reader sent in a pix of the old Central School bell in Stephens county. Central was located about 7 miles west of Marlow, Oklahoma. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/centralhigh3.jpg

A Reader gave me some really nice persimmons this week. I had almost forgot what they tasted like it had been so long since I've ate any. The seeds inside are so big there is not a whole lot of pulp, but what pulp there was, sure had a very good sweet taste. But you know if you eat one a green persimmon (light yellow one on the right in the pix) it will make your lips pucker so bad you can't even pronounce your words correctly! These particular persimmons came from the SE part of Ardmore next to the railroad tracks. Thats the persimmon's seed in the foreground in the pix. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/persimmons3a.jpg 

I even took one of the seeds and split it open to see that tiny spoon inside. You just use a sharp pocket knife to trim all the way round the outer rim, then carefully pry the seed halves apart. You may find several places on the internet that tells/shows about the lowly persimmon, but you'll only find it here where you can see an actually photo of the "spoon" inside the persimmon seed, right here at OklahomaHistory.net! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/persimmons3b.jpg 

And here is a photo of the persimmon tree and the seed! Maybe some of you know what the persimmon is predicting in your locale or state? Accordinng to the http://www.FarmersAlmanac.com website, when the seed is spoon-shaped, it is going to be a harsh winter with heavy wet snow. Fork-shaped denotes a mild winter with light powdery snow. And, knife shaped, an icy winter with cutting winds. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/persimmons3c.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/persimmons3d.jpg 

Here is a help page I ceated to assist with keeping viruses off your computer. If you dont run a virus check, keep its DAT file undated, and run it regularly, then you probably have a computer virus. If you dont want to buy a virus checker, and pay the yearly updates, at least run the free Online Virus checkers mentioned on my Virus Help Page. They do work. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/virushelp.html

A couple of weeks ago we talked about the 1980s radio spots "Once Upon A Time" that was done by Ardmoreite Betty Carroll as one minute spots for a local bank. I talked to Betty this week and she has graciously consented to post one of her 1980s "spots" here each weekend! So here is the first!

Recorded by Betty Carroll October 17, 1984..... "Once upon a time.... some Ringling residents will remember the Cornish Children's Home that began as a dream for Moses E. Harris, who taught school at the Chickasaw Chapel near Marietta. He dreamed one night that he built a magnificent orphanage. Shortly after his dream, Harris began securing funds to build such a place in Cornish, Oklahoma.

The frame structure was started in October 1903. Then in 1917 the three-story wooden caught fire. It was a sad day for all the kids who lived in the home, but it didn't take long for rebuilding to begin. Funds were slow to come in so Wirt Franklin, a local oilman, paid for the completion of the building after striking oil near Oklahoma City.

After Harris reached old age he sold the 297 acres and home for $7,000 with the understanding that the home would keep going. After about two years it sold to an individual and the doors were closed forever. The home ultimately housed over 1,700 homeless children.

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"A biography of FRED BEAVER can be found here." http://www.askart.com/artist/B/fred_beaver.asp
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"The Taylor store was also were Sooner Foods was when it first came to Ardmore in the late 50's early 60's then they moved over on Washington were Dollar General store is now next door was Bill and Barbs Restaurant. I work at the store when the safe was stolen from window, when the a A-frame truck back though the window and put a cable around the safe. And down the road they went, out Refinery Road near Caddo Creek on Clyde Elmore's place they put the safe in a car and got stuck. They might have made there get away but Bill and Barb's was still open and Mr Short heard the crash and call police. The store was burglarized again and a police officer was killed by the last name of Rudisell and also one of the buglers was killed. They would have more than like succeed if hadn't been for Mr Red who was cleaning the floors at night. And heard the concrete hitting the floor in the meat market. He unlocked the front door and went down to Washington and Highway 70 at that time. Caught a ride to the police station and told them. They had a big shoot out knocking out the freezer compressors. When all was done the two men where dead. The store was owned by Mr Howe and Mace Williams."
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"Here's a copy of the 1900 map of Oklahoma and Indian Territories that appeared in the "National Standard Atlas of the World". If you like, I can also scan in maps of Texas or any other map (from this book) that you might enjoy. I've had this book for several years now. It also shows the population noted as of the 1890 census, and a description of the states and territories. Quite interesting. Enjoy!" -Roy Kendrick http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/okla1900a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/okla1900b.jpg
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Q. My sister and I cannot remember what the spoon, knife and fork inside the Persimmon seed stand for. A. According to folklore, when the seed is spoon-shaped, it is going to be a harsh winter with heavy wet snow. Fork-shaped denotes a mild winter with light powdery snow. And, knife shaped, an icy winter with cutting winds. ------------------------------------------------------------------------
I was rummaging through some of my Dad's old stuff and found some negatives taken about 1950. My Dad owned the lumber yard shown in this picture. He also owned the building that the P&B Electric is shown. I thought maybe you would enjoy looking at a little history from Sulphur. The location of this building is now the new location of the Sulphur Chamber of Commerce. It's located just west of the Rock Creek bridge and on the south side of Sulphur High School. The second picture is scanned from an old scene on East Muskogee street, don't know the date, but very early as indicated by the cars. The large building is the old Artesian Hotel which burned about 1955." -Mike Carr http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/SulphurBuildersSupply.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/Sulphur03a.jpg
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"Hello Butch, You should find "Mary Holland (McNeish) Kinkaid" in this index. In the This n That you said Helen but it should be Mary. I hope this helps you find the info you want. http://www.ionet.net/~okhombre/hton.html

Also Mary Holland (McNeish) Kinkaid is listed as one of the Correspondents on this document." -Lee Wages, Ft. Worth, Texas http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/lilly/mss/html/dreiser2.html
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"When i was a child my family would get together for a nice sunday picnic at Devil's Den. Most of my family is gone now but i still have very fond memories of Devil's Den. I still live here and i wish that my daughters and grandchildren could have the same memories that i have it is such a beautiful place."
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"The website below about the aircraft at Ardmore is not current. It is my understanding that the organization that was salvaging the aircraft is no longer active at Ardmore. As I recall from my last visit to the airfield, only one gutted aircraft used by the fire department for training is there presently. Although interesting to see when several were there, it also detracted from the appearance of the industrial site as it appeared to be a junkyard as they remained in various stages of dismantling." http://www.airchive.com/SITE%20PAGES/VIN-ARDMORE.html
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Interview Date: September 17, 1937 Name: John WARD Address: Chickasha, Oklahoma Name of Father: Sam WARD Name of Mother: Leza TINER WARD Field Worker's name: Etta D. MASON

The first church bell ever brought to this country was one bought by the Masons and used in their hall at Boggy Depot. The bell was shipped to Kansas City and had to be hauled in a wagon from there to Boggy Depot. My father furnished the oxen to haul the bell with. It took two yoke of oxen to make the trip. After the lodge was dissolved at Boggy Depot, the bell was given to the Indian Baptist Church at Standing Rock. I do not know where the bell is now. Standing Rock is eight miles west of Atoka in Atoka County. http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgenweb/pioneer/ohs/wardjohn.htm
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"Butch, Assessor's website went over 500,000 Hits this week!" http://www.cartercountyassessor.org
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"The brochure states: Marlow, Indian Territory Est. 1898 Marlow was laid off by the federal gov't in what was known along the Chisholm Trail as "Marlow Grove", at which cattle trains stopped over for night and rest stops. Marlow has an interesting history to tell, from the Marlow brothers, who spawned the movie, "The Sons of Katie Elder", to the exciting historical activities of present day community."
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"Butch, I shot the attached photo a few days ago on the old ONMP (Oklahoma, New Mexico and Pacific) line better known around here as the Ringling Road that BNSF uses today to get to the Uniroyal Tire Plant. The manufacture date is 1909 as shown in the photo. Quite unusual that itactually predates the line itself. Construction on the old line was started in 1913 and most of the rails have dates of 1944-45 and some with 1926 markings as you would expect. The 1909 rail is a very short piece and located under the I35 underpass and is the oldest one I've found so far. Apparently it was spliced in some time after construction even though it's older than the line itself." -C. Dwane Stevens http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/1909rail.jpg
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"I was born in San Angelo, TX in 1910. My father W.B. McMurry was a construction foreman of a railroad crew building the rail lines into New Mexico. My grandparents were early settlers in the Ardmore area, arriving from Texas about 1888. My mother, Clive Thomason had attended school in Ardmore, and graduated about 1907. When I was a year old my parents returned to Ardmore, and settled in the small community of Provence, in Carter Co. OK. Children 5 years old were allowed to start to school in those days. I do not remember much about the school building but I remember the class room and my teacher, Miss Loggins. My grandmother on my father's side was a widow, Mary S. McMurry. She took in laundry, washing and ironing for others. Miss Loggins was one of her customers so she knew me through my grandmother, before I ever started school. She was always very sweet and kind to me.

My parents moved again, this time near my mother's parents, the E.C. Thomasons. It was one and a half miles northeast of Ardmore, OK and I attended a second country school. Thhis was Hignight school. Hignight school had one room and they taught first to eighth grade. The grades were divided by having the children seated in certain rows. This was a two teacher school. My teacher, Miss Bonnie taught the younger children, and Miss Callie my aunt taught the older students. There was a wood stove which the teacher came early to start each morning before the students arrived. We walked to school each day and took our lunch in a syrup bucket usually biscuits or cornbread with salt pork. I remember one little boy brought what looked like vanilla pudding or clabbered milk in a jar, he'd eat it with a spoon. It always looked so good. Sometimes he'd trade his lunch with one of the other students. I thought he always had a "good lunch". Each student was asked to bring a folding metal cup, so we could drink from a bucket of cold water drawn from the well in front of the school.

I finished the second grade at Hignight then my grandparents decided that my uncle and aunt who were only a few years older than me, could drive a horse and buggy and attend school in Ardmore. They could stop by and pick me up each morning. I went to Washington grade school in Ardmore for 3rd through 6th grade. My aunt lived in Ardmore, and we could leave the horse and buggy at her home and walk on to school from her house. I attended 4 grades at this school in town and then I returned to the little country school. There was only one teacher at that time because there were fewer students in the community. My aunt Callie Layman was the teacher. I finished the 7th-8th grade at Hignight. I have happy memories of attending this country school both when I was just starting school and also the later yrs. We had slate to write on at first. Our class of young students was seated on a bench. In the entry way at the school door, the teacher kept a few long willow switches. I saw them used many times, usually the teacher used them on the older boys.

I'll tell you about one incident during second grade that was funny for others but tragic to me, my teacher was single, her gentleman friend stopped by the school to take her home one afternoon. She told him she couldn't leave yet so as he went out the door, he gathered up all of our coats and caps and left with them. As he got into his car, I caught sight of my new red cap and I just knew I'd never see it again, I was broken hearted. He brought them back later and to heal my broken heart, he gave me a nickel.

My second time at this school for 7th and 8th grade, I was older, and we had less children attending. There were not enough boys or girls to have separate teams for sports so we had mixed teams. We played baseball and basketball. This one time we were playing baseball and I was the 3rd baseman. One of the boys hit a ball to 3rd base, before I could catch it the ball hit the ground and bounced up my skirt. All the boys hee-hawed and of course I was very embarrassed.

Another time, my mother had made me a new dress and I was a little late getting off to school that morning so my brothers and sisters had walked on. A friend came by in his car and asked if I'd like a ride, so at first I turned him down but then I told him I'd just ride on the running board. He had to take the cream and milk into Ardmore each morning before he came on to school. When he reached the corner where I needed to get off he told me he was going to take me on to Ardmore. I didn't want to go of course so I jumped and fell tumbling on the ground. It hurt but I was more concerned that I had gotten my new dress dirty. He thought it was so funny, he laughed and laughed. He was a good friend, but he liked to tease like all the boys at that age. One time during one of our basketball games one of the big boys, grabbed me and another girl and bumped our heads together. I happened to be wearing a new dress this time also, and the girls' head hit me in the nose, and it bled all over my new dress. It was kinda scary too because we had a hard time stopping the bleeding. Still I was more upset that it might ruin my new dress. The teacher tried all the old remedies, like putting scissors to my back, and putting a dime under my lip, the kids were all offering advice. Sometimes things got a little rough but they were fun and happy times." -Ruth M. Calvery in Duncan, Oklahoma
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"Mr Bridges: I was pleased to read the article in T&T on 10-17-03 that referred to Taylor Bros Grocery on "A" street and 11th Ave NE. We were very familiar with that store- we lived at 1100 "A" NE for several years and did a lot of shopping there. But the amazing part was finding out who wrote the article about the store to you. Turned out to be a class mate of mine at Mt. Washington school. We both graduated in 1944, he from Ardmore High School while I had continued at Mt Washington and graduated from there. We always appreciate the T&T but that made it EXTRA special- so a BIG THANK YOU for making it possible to make contact with a long lost friend." -Virginia (Gilstrap) Farrington BobF327631@aol.com
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"Butch, Re the pics of Dr. Emmajean Anthis: I recognized Mrs. Joyce (Mrs. Reynolds Cantrell Sr.) on the front row with white scarf - am not sure but think the lady on right end of front row might be one of the Massad ladies. My mother, Vera Fronterhouse Horton, worked for Dr. Em for several years." -Regards, Jo (Fronterhouse) Long http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/anthis3a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/anthis4a.jpg
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I'm still working on the 1936 Charles Lynch Movie. But here is that one minute clip again. Its a pretty large file if you dont have broadband. Its over 1 meg in size so it could take 15 minutes or more to download on a slow modem. Here is a link to that one minute clip! Must have QuickTime to see. Also I got my new DVD burner working, so I'm making progress. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/downloads/lynch1min.mov

Speaking of that 1936 Charles C. 'Jack' Lynch film, there was a nice write-up in The Daily Ardmoreite about it last Sunday. http://ardmoreite.com/stories/102603/loc_movie.shtml

I've added some more coins this week to my Coin Page. I've also added a Page telling how I got into the coin collecting hobby years ago along with an interesting story or two. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/coins.html

Last week when I told about receiving word from Doug Williams that our troops were due back next month, I had a typo in the link to the 12' X 24' banner that's being printed. Donations continue to come in from people who want to help pay for the banner and billboard. If you made a pledge back last summer and still want to help, let us know. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/notforgotten3.jpg

"It is the Veteran, not the preacher, who has given us freedom of religion.
It is the Veteran, not the reporter, who has given us freedom of the press.
It is the Veteran, not the poet, who has given us freedom of speech.
It is the Veteran, not the campus organizer, who has given us freedom to assemble.
It is the Veteran, not the lawyer, who has given us the right to a fair trial.
It is the Veteran, not the politician, who has given us the right to vote."

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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Saturday October 25, 2003 T&T Weekly Vol 7 Issue 340

Lone Grove resident Troy Loard brought by a 1968 Carter County Civil Defense pamphlet this week. I worked with Troy a couple of years at the ambulance office back in the early 1970s. Troy then went to work at the new Uniroyal Plant and just recently retired from there, now living the good life out at Lone Grove.

This 1968 Civil Defense pamphlet is about what to do and where to go in case of a nuclear attack, and how to build a fallout shelter at home. Those who endorsed this pamphlet back in January 1968 were: Huss Standifer, County Commissioner District 1; Joyce Taliaferro, County Commissioner District 2; Thomas M. Fraser, County Commissioner District 3; Gerald D. Wilkins, City Manager, Scott F. King, Vice-Mayor of Ardmore; and Carno R. Elkins, Civil Defense Director.

The pamphlet list dozens of buildings in Ardmore where citizens can go for shelter along with how many people each of those buildings can hold. If you lived outside Ardmore you were instructed to drive to the city limits, park your vehicle, and walk to the nearest designated shelter. This was in order keep the streets of Ardmore as clear as possible for emergency vehicles.

Some of the lesser known buildings to everyone might be: Chickasha Hall at Carter Seminary (130 people), Colverts Dairy (1,902 people), State Armory on Sunset Drive (1,080), Daube Building at #5 South Commerce (341), Ardmore Jr High (466), Cooper Farms on West Broadway (187), Noble Building at 100 W. Broadway (328), Carter County Courthouse House (680), Federal Building at North Washington and West Broadway (1,586), Weithall First Presbyterian Church (412), Washington School basement (11), Echols Building at 200 East Main (200), Little Building at 10 West Main (1,637), First National Bank at 15 West Main (489), Tivoli Movie (233 people) and many others.

The old 1968 pamphlet also has diagrams of how to make a homemade shelter in your basement or a room of your home. Those who had shelters at home were asked not to go to the public shelters. This was really an interesting piece of history that Troy Loard brought by. We still have the yellow triangle signs in the courthouse that designated it at fallout shelter back in those days. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/civildefense1968a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/civildefense1968b.jpg

A Reader brought me by a photograph of James Holmes Akers, the first sheriff of Carter County. The photo was by Webb Studios of Ardmore. I can only imagine the pride and honor Holmes Akers must have had to be the first sheriff of this county. http://www.brightok.net/cartercounty/photos/AkersHolmes03a.jpg 

Speaking of sheriff Holmes Akers, here is a listing of the deputies he had under him back in 1907: A.L. Davis, L.B. Tatum, G.B. Salyer, T.J. Storre, John Harrison, John Mahoney, W.E. Landrum, C.F. Worley, G. Paschal, Fred Williams, L.B. Johnson, E.R Poole, J.W. Bochers, J.B. Smith, Ed Heart, N.H. Simmons.

Now I only lack photos of 4 past sheriffs of Carter county! Maybe someone out there has a lead on these four. http://www.brightok.net/cartercounty/CarterCountySheriffs.html

I also had a Reader bring me by an old photo with Dr Emma Jean Anthis in it, along with some of her friends. We are not sure when the two photos was taken, but it looks like they may have been taken as part of the Healdton Frontier Days. We are hoping someone out there recognizes some of the people in the photo. Thats Dr Emma Jean Anthis on the left in the photo. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/anthis3a.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/anthis4a.jpg

Has anyone ever heard of a book called 'Man Of Yesterday' by Helen Holland Kinkaid? The 1908 book is centered around Tishomingo, Oklahoma. A Reader in west Texas originally from Mannsville, her mother has had the book for many years. I did a search for the author's name and found nothing. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/manofyesterday.jpg

A T&T Reader was over at Cordell, Oklahoma at the Washita County courthouse doing some business this week. She noticed a granite marker outside that was a real piece of history info. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/whitemanplaque.jpg 

Maybe we need to have a campaign started to re-open Devils Den north of Tishomingo. This week my webshots.com albums lacked only 9 Hits at going over 1,700 Hits for the week, another record week! And guess which album received the most Hits, again? You got it, the Devils Den photos. Maybe the powers-that-be over in Tish will work on opening Devils Den, the public wants that recreation spot open to the pubic again! Boy, I still remember from my teen age years that COLD water! http://community.webshots.com/album/29733398gxVnvBScVX

Doug Williams notified me this week that our troops will be coming home next month. He has been receiving the pledges promised last summer by some of you who wanted to help pay for a banner. If any of you didnt get your chance last summer, now is the time to help. Just send an email to Doug. nascar88@cableone.net Here is a pix of how the 12 ft by 25 ft banner will look. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/notforgotten3.jpg

Browse the Index of Photos from July 1, 2003 to date http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b

Browse the Index of Photos before July 1, 2003 http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos 

"I pledge allegiance to my flag and to the republic for which it stands; one nation, indivisible with liberty and justice for all." "The flag is displayed in every school room in Carter county, and the flag salute given each week." -from the 1923 Kate Galt Zaneis Carter County School book

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Hi Butch, thoroughly enjoy reading "this n that" and the email received on ConnectOklahoma Listserver. Just wanted you to notify all interested parties on your mailing list that the AHS Class of 1953 will be celebrating their 50th class reunion Friday Oct 31 at the Nobel Pavilion beginning at 6pm. If members of other classes would care to drop by to visit we would love to see them. They can reach me at lastout@brightok.net. Thanks and keep up the great work." -Lou Ann Fraser Stout http://www.oklahomahistory.net/connectoklahoma.html
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"Butch, I just read the latest T&T and as usual was very informative. In past article, there was an inquire about the Grocery store at Brock. I was born close to Brock and spent most of my life there. In the late 30's and early 40's I remember there being (2) stores there. One was owned and operated by Whit Carrol sr. and one was operated by a Mrs. Trent. Trent was post mistress, as the post office was in her store. I attended 7th and 8th grade in the Brock school. Mr. L.F. Freeman was my teacher those 2 years. I have a brother living at Brock, on the lot where the grocery stores were located. He has lived there over 40 years. SO times change. I also had a Sister and her Husband owned and operated a small country store at Stobtown. When they closed at Stobtown, they moved south off hwy 70 west going toward Brock. Called the Brock road. They operated there for a few years. Mentioning the W.P.A. work relief. my Dad helped build Lake Murray in the 1930's. Each year my family have a family reunion at the lake and relatives come from far distances to attend. Our Great uncle was in the C.C.C. and helped build the camp grounds at Lake Murray."
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"Airline aficionados are familiar with the typical graveyards of Mojave, Marana, and Las Vegas but an impressive collection of derelict airliners exists 75 miles south of Oklahoma City in Ardmore, Oklahoma. The short runway, barely 5,000 feet means this is the air equivalent of "The Roach Motel" - Planes check in but they don't check out. Virtually every airframe here is destined for the scrappers. It's most famous victim was the L-1011 prototype which was scrapped in 1986. These images were taken in November, 1999." http://www.airchive.com/SITE%20PAGES/VIN-ARDMORE.html
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"hi butch, got my latest pictures up on worldisround.com, have cushing,perkins,sayre ok, sayre ok courthouse. thank you." http://worldisround.com/articles/20735/ http://www.worldisround.com/articles/23280/index.html http://www.worldisround.com/articles/23265/index.html http://www.worldisround.com/articles/23143/index.html http://www.worldisround.com/articles/23143/index.html
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"Butch, I was in Miss Duston's "Three Ring Circus" at the Civic Auditorium for about three years. She always put me in the middle of the dance line because I was the tallest! That was quite a spectacular thing in the 1950s. I was in it in the early 50s, I guess. Don't know if she had it my senior year (1955) Too old to remember!"
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"I was wondering if you or someone else might have some information on the Eaves City School. It was located about 2 miles southwest of Tatum. I had two Aunts that taught there, probably in the 30's. The church building was about 1/2 mile east of the school site and it was moved out in the early 50's. I understand it was moved to Graham to become classrooms. I lived about 1/2 mile north of the school site & all I can remember are some foundations. Hope someone knows something. Thanks." -Sue Walker
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"Hi Butch, Enjoyed your T&T tonight. I have posters of Obie Johnson when he was running for Constable July 6, 1954." http://peggysue5.homestead.com/Obie.html
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"Hi Butch. I enjoy your newsletter very much. I have a picture of sheriff J. Holmes Akers. He was my grandfather's brother. My Grandfather was George B. Akers, and he had a store and post office in Woodford, Oklahoma." -Joyce Jordan http://www.brightok.net/cartercounty/photos/AkersHolmes03a.jpg
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"Hi Butch, This is old Luther L. Wooley. My dad told me that Convict Hill got it name because convicts were used to cut the road through that stretch. Also the person asking about the Taylor's Store, I remember Joe and Josie Taylor very well. Me and my cousin and friends used to roll car tires to Joe Taylor's big green two story store on A St & 11th N.E. and sell pop bottles and fishing sinkers me and my cousin would make. The sinkers we made with a mold my uncle Albert Marr had. The car tire are a story in there self. Us kids used to roll car tire every where we went like other kids would ride bicycles. I would always buy licorice with my pennies, It came in pieces about as big as a pencil and about 12" long in those days and was only a penny a piece. Mr Taylor would give credit to a lot of the families in that part of town. He also let people hock things to him and stuff like that. He was a good person and was well liked and helped alot of people. Then when his store burned he built a small building on that spot for a liquor store but the city wouldn't let him open it so he opened it as a small grocery. They had a small store there for a while. Mrs Taylor ran it I think. Keep up the good work." -Luther L. Wooley wooley1989@wmconnect.com
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"Butch, At the corner of highway 53 and the highway 76 that goes north out of Healdton there used to be a grocery store named Sullivan's, the man's name who owned it. West of Sullivan's was Convict Hill and they used convicts at the time to build the road. At one time it was so steep you could hardly get up it."
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"Butch, Here are the photos I took in Gainesville. One is Denton Street at night. The others are of old houses. I did not write down the addresses. As you can see I am not a pro at taking pictures." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/gainesville3a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/gainesville3b.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/gainesville3c.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/gainesville3d.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/gainesville3e.jpg
------------------------------------------------------------------------ "Butch -- I just got home from my vacation to Oklahoma. We did see quite a bit of southeastern Oklahoma and did get to go to Turner Falls. I hadn't been there since I was about 6 years old. And I also found Magnetic Hill. Very interesting place. It does pull you back up the hill while you are in neutral. Found an interesting store at Cushman's corner. Lots of neat stuff inside. And was able to do some metal detecting in the Byars city square. Had a great time and Oklahoma is greener than I have seen it in a long time. Was able to share "This & That " with some of my cousins in the Stratford/Byars area." -Gary Shook, Tulare, CA
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"I have 2 small prints by Fred Beaver and cant find any info on him could you help at all?"
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"Wow, that picture of the old Tower Motel surely brought back many memories. First of all, I used to live across the street from there, on Davis Street. Secondly, my Grandfather, Raybon Wilkes, and I ate many a chicken fried steak at that place. That's just one of the many great memories I have of my time spent with him. Most of those memories include hours on horseback, and the old Ardmore Round Up Club. Thanks for reminding me." -Christie Sullivan Reeves
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"You may want to share this web address with your This & That subscribers. It is the best place I have found to quickly locate used, rare and out-of-print books. I recently found a 1935 edition of a book there that I had searched for for the past 20 years. The web site is: http://www.abebooks.com
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"Butch, there were several convict tent camps near Davis and Springer. The state had convicts building roads and other state projects. I think they built their own prison at McAlester. The state also had the prisoners raising their own food including cattle. Sometimes the cattle were treated better than the convicts. There was a tent camp near Turner Falls where the convicts repaired the road building equipment and provided a staging area for some of the materials required to build the highway. They provided labor for one of the quarries where stone fill was provided. There was a small tent hospital of sorts where convicts with minor injuries could spend a day or two recuperating. Trusties would sometimes be in charge of other prisoners. That is the way I remember the stories from a class at OU many years ago."
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"Where would I go on the net to find out about the utensils in the persimmon seeds? I have tried several things but have not found any thing regarding this. We picked some persimmons yesterday, opened the seeds of several and there is a perfect spoon in each of them. I have asked some old timers, older and smarter than me :o), and they can tell me they are there and that the spoon represents a mild winter, a knife means a cutting cold winter but I have yet to find anyone who can tell me what the fork means."

Accordinng to the http://www.FarmersAlmanac.com website, when the seed is spoon-shaped, it is going to be a harsh winter with heavy wet snow. Fork-shaped denotes a mild winter with light powdery snow. And, knife shaped, an icy winter with cutting winds."
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"Butch, Don't know if you have any readers with interest or ties to Eastern Johnston county (besides me) but this saturday 10/25/03, Wapanuck Trades Day Celebration is taking place. Parade at 10am, Then re-enactment of bank robbery, chuck wagon display, and demos as well as garage sales, flea markets, etc. Dale Lay from noon to 2pm and a rodeo at 2pm as well as a street dance at 8pm." -Jerry Landrum
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"Saw an ad for Sipokni West haunted town and woods (at Reagan, Oklahoma). It will be open Oct 30, 31, Nov 1st from dark till 9 p.m. Adults $5.00, ages 6-11 $3.00, 5 and under free."
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"Here is a group shot of men I believe that mom said they were plumbers. The guy that has "Daddy" written about his head is William McDougal or Mac. I don't know what type of badges they are wearing. The others I do not know but if anyone does please let me know. Taken in Ardmore, Oklahoma. The year is long before I was born, about 1920 or 1910. I have also include for you a receipt of 4 lots bought in Rosehill cemetery. The rest of the pictures are of Ft Sill, OKlahoma that I wrote to you about, taken in 1930. Sure like the roads back then, like the turn Pike. The water picture I don't know where it "would" have been at on the Fort, my guess close by just not there anymore. I do have more of the pictures on hand but did not want to over wham ya. Thanks for letting me share." -Vera Jones http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/mcdougal1920a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/mcdougal1920b.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/mcdougal1920c.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/mcdougal1920d.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/mcdougal1920e.jpg
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Concerning the McDougal photos above, I noticed the one of the 1917 cemetery receipt was signed by a Charles C. Lynch. He went by "Jack" and was the father of Charlotte Lynch Henderson of Houston who last week gave me the 1936 film her father made of the construction work at Lake Murray. Small world sometimes. I'm still working on that historic piece of 43 minute film. More next week. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/mcdougal1920b.jpg

I do have a 1 minute clip of the 1936 film for a glimpse of this old video. You can download it, but it takes a free progam by the name of QuickTime to view it. If you don't have QuickTime installed on your computer, you can download it here. http://www.apple.com/quicktime

The one minute clip is a pretty large file if you dont have broadband. Its over 1 meg in size so it could take 15 minutes or more on a slow modem. Here is a link to that one minute clip! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/downloads/lynch1min.mov

I appreciate all the Hits to my coin pages the past two weeks. I guess there are T&T Readers out there that like coins. I started my coin collecting back when I was a teen. My 3rd cousin, Howard Heath (1897-1980) of McAllen, Texas was a coin collector. He collected mostly Mexican coins since they were abundant in south Texas where he and his wife Irene lived. He was a journeyman electrician and electrical contractor many years in McAllen. Howard went to coin shows all over Texas, and sometimes at Christmas time he'd bring coins up to our house and let me see them. When he gave me a silver dollar or two, I was hooked. When Howard Heath died in 1980 at McAllen he had over $450,000 in coins in his estate. Anyway, I've added more coins the past couple of evenings. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/coins.html

In Flanders Fields - 1915
By John McCrae, MD, Captain, Canadian Army Medical Corps
"In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields."

During World War I, on December 6, 1915, this poem appeared in "Punch," a popular British periodical. Published anonymously, it was later discovered to have been written that spring by Canadian medical officer Captain John McCrae. During the second battle of Ypres, fought in Flanders, the French and Belgian lands bordered by the North Sea, McCrae's best friend, a young officer, had been severely wounded by enemy shellfire and McCrae was unable to save his life. He took charge of his burial and the grave was dug and the service conducted in a field where poppies softly trembled on their slender stalks in the gentle spring breeze. His friend's death, one of so many Captain McCrae had already witnessed, inspired him to write these words, which have since become characterized as forming the best-known poem ever written about war and the price it exacts from those -- mostly young -- who are called upon to wage it. (From an email) http://www.abmc.gov/ff.htm http://www.inflandersfields.be/

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

Saturday October 18, 2003 T&T Weekly Vol 7 Issue 339

A couple of years ago I took a photo of the bronze statue of Ardmoreite Walter W. Drew which stands in Rose Hill Cemetery as a remembrance of his courage in battle. Lieutenant Walter Drew lost his life on the battlefield in France in 1918 during World War 1. I re-took the pictures this week because the ones two years ago were too dark from the sun setting in the background.

Walter was the son of Ardmoreite Byron Drew. Byron Drew sold all his property in Texas in 1898 and moved to Ardmore, Indian Territory. He established the Drew home at 403 F SW and purchased half interest in The Daily Ardmoreite. He would later sell his interest in the Ardmoreite and go into banking and real estate business. Byron died in 1932 and is buried at Rose Hill Cemetery next to his son Walter. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/DrewWalter2.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/DrewWalter4.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/DrewWalter5.jpg 

In July 1938 there was a house fire at 1508 West Broadway here in Ardmore. The occupant of the house was the J.L Duncan family. They lost all their belongings and clothes. A Reader gave me a letter written by Mr. Duncan asking help to get clothes, etc. to replace those that burned. Bear in mind that 1 dollar back in 1938 equaled $12 at todays value. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/duncan1938.jpg

This is an old photo of a Harvey Funeral Home hearse/ambulance. Maybe someone knows about what year this is?? http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/harveyhearse2.jpg 

Most have heard of the old Wirt Franklin Refinery here in Ardmore. It would change hands several times over the years, and today is known as Valero Oil Refinery. But in its beginning the owner was oil millionaire Wirt Franklin. This is Mr. Franklin's campaign card he used in his 1944 bid for the U.S. Senate. Maybe his bid was doomed from the beginning. Back in 1944 the county codes for Carter county auto tags was 13. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/franklincard.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/oklatagscodes.jpg 

I ran across a photo of Walter Colbert this week. He is in the Kate Zaneis 1923 school book, listed as Chairman of the Oklahoma Cotton Growers Association. Walter Colbert was the 5th sheriff to serve Carter County. The first one, J. Holmes Akers, was elected in 1907. I have photos of all the sheriffs except Holmes Akers, Willis Tennyson, Howard Johnson, Jack Powledge, Gerald Cobb and Elmer Fitzsimmons. I know where there is a photo of Willis Tennyson I can scan, and I can get Gerald Cobb's photo, I hope. (you hear me Gerald?) Just need the other 4! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/ColbertWalter2.jpg http://www.brightok.net/cartercounty/CarterCountySheriffs.html

Roosevelt School (Carter County) burned to the ground January 16, 1922.

Here's a postcard of the Tower Motel that used to be on North Commerce. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/towermotel.jpg 

In July 1960 the school at Big Canyon near Dougherty was ordered to close and be relocated by the next July. The entire community would finally be closed, consisting of nearly 30 buildings, including a church.

Here is a photo of students who attended the old Provence School east of Ardmore. Maybe someone will recognize some of the students and let us know their names. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/provenceschool2.jpg  http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/provenceschool.jpg 

August 14, 1976 Cooks Laundry on A Street NE burns to the ground. $300,000 loss.

I've been handed a lot of campaign cards through the years. But one card a Reader gave me this week is for me the prize of them all. In 1966 Wilson resident Otto Powell ran for sheriff. There would later be a Grand Jury investigation for alleged irregularities in that July 1 Primary Election in Carter county. Otto Powell would never hold the Office of Sheriff. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/ottopowell1966.jpg 

Bridge of the River Kwai with William Holden and Alec Guinness was playing when the Tivoli Theater burned in September 1958.

Convict Hill is located a few miles west of Graham, Oklahoma just west of Highway 76. A Reader wrote in asking if anyone knows how this hill got its name. I don't know, maybe someone out there does though!

A Reader in Duncan sent in another 1930 photograph of the old Stephens County courthouse. The courthouse served the public from 1921 to 1968 when it was torn down and a new one built. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/stephensco1930a.jpg 

Some of you have tried to send me an email this week and my anti-spam website got hold of it first. Most of the time I can "resend" it to myself, and then read it normally. I have received one email from a webtv user saying they can not click on the "authenticate" link and enable their email to come on through to me. I'll check on that. But all things considered, it seems like n-dream.com is catching nearly all the spam. http://spam.n-dream.com

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Hi Butch, Hey I just emailed you yesterday and today I checked my email that had been forwarded to me by a friend and Lo and behold there was the nice listing of schools as of 1923. My Grandmother Rosabelle Millington Pruitt (widow of Clint "Pote" Pruitt) started teaching at 16. She was married to Theo Torgenson and went by that name for a lot of those years. She taught 48 years total in Carter County. She taught at Prairie Valley, Shady Grove, Brock, Cheek, Pooleville and retired from Plainview in 1960 after 17 years teaching the 3rd grade. I wonder if any of her students read your This and That newsletters? Again I am so happy to get a copy listing the schools in Carter County so long ago." -Marcella Whitson Smith http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/cartercountyschools1923.jpg
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"Butch, someone mentioned A&P Grocery in Ardmore and it reminded me of a "funny." I was called Pete by my family and friends so when my niece and nephews came along they called me "Auntie Pete." One day my nephew's wife told me that she thought they were calling me A&P and she wondered why they were calling me a grocery store."
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"Butch, A reader in this weeks T&T asked if there was a flood of water in one of the pictures. He must have been referring to the road in the picture. There is no water. This picture was taken from the top of the hill looking at some of the company houses that made up the village of Big Canyon. The main road from Nebo to the quarry ran straight through the village, by the school and post office and straight into the quarry gate. The houses you see in the picture are on a short road that turns south off the main road just east of where the school building used to be. I think you have another picture showing the houses on the main road..Another reader asked about the river picture. This was taken in 1957 during a flood. The track that the cars are on is Dolese Track one which was a storage track. The other two tracks ran under the loading bins at the crushing plant and cars were loaded by opening trap door gates loading crushed stone directly into the cars. These two tracks were called track two and track three." -Roy Miller
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"Stephens County had a District Judge for decades named Arthur Marmaduke who was a fine, disciplined jurist. Top flight reputation for intelligence, fairness and integrity. Without mentioning it to anyone but the Court Clerk, Judge Marmaduke saw the need for a new courthouse and quietly began to accumulate funds over the years in the local clerk registry from fines, costs, etc., until the fund reached 400k plus. The judge then issued an order to destroy the old courthouse and build the new one where it sits now. All hell broke loose, as the custom had existed for years that Court Clerks simply used their money through the year, then sent in what they didn`t use at the end of the year to the Supreme Court. Well, Judge Marmaduke`s actions upset a lot of the Supremes so new orders came down and exist today that severely restrict local courts from spending any money. All goes to Oklahoma City is the rule." -james clark
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"Hi Butch, Do you have any information on Shady Dale School south on Hedges Road. It was about 1 mile south of the Bussell Road. My Grandmother taught school there about 1927 and my mother and her sister walked to the Bussell Road and caught the Plainview Bus. The school must have went to only the 7 or 8th grade. Do I have the name correct. The old foundation is still there. Also my great grand parents are buried in a small cemetery about 1 mile off Myall on Hedges Road. Their names were Grounds. Do you have information about that burial spot. I would like to go there this winter, but it is on private land. Some one told me the name of the people that own the property but I have forgotten what it is. I was told there was a fence at one time but it is torn down. Please email me your newsletter. Thanks."
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"Butch: I have read with considerable interest your stories of various grocery stores in Ardmore. I graduated from AHS in i944 and went directly into the Navy. My grandfather, James A. Taylor, and two sons, Bill and Joe Taylor, operated Taylor Brothers Grocery Store in Ardmore for at least thirty five years. The last address was 1023 A St. N.E., but papa's original store was on the corner of C Street and 11th N.E. J.A. Taylor was a master mason and pulled many a person in Ardmore through the depression by extending them credit when they were out of work. Anyone with a hard luck story could get credit from the old man. He also ran the family farm out on the Mount Washington road, originally known as the old Cruce Place. The old man died in 1958, and both sons a few years later. I would love to hear from any of your readers that remembers and has a story about James Alfred Taylor, or Joe and Bill Taylor. I always read and appreciate T&T." -John Graham grah4453@bellsouth.net
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"The person who wrote about the small grocery stores in N.W. Ardmore, the one on E by Franklin school was owned by Mr. & Mrs. Seagraves. He had a lot of credit that wasn't being payed so he gave the people a chance to pay the debt off by working on a house he was building. The house was at 531 G. N.W. My folks bought the house from him in the early 40's and sold it in 48 when we moved from Ardmore to Denver, Colorado. It was a big old house that set on 2 lots and had beautiful black walnut trees in the yard. Those trees had been grafted with English Walnut and were big and could be picked out in halves. If you know "black walnut" that was really something. Mother mad pies like pecan pie." -Jo Evelyn Barton joeveb2003@yahoo.com
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"Hi Butch - I'm still enjoying all your newsletters. As I remember, the old Jefferson Elementary school had one of those curved metal slide fire exits up until it was rebuilt as a one-story building about l938. The first graders were on the first floor of the old building, so we didn't get to dream of a fire drill and going down the slides! Too bad!" -gkallgren@aol.com
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"Saw the e-mail in your last T&T about Doris Duston's 3-ring circus. I was in it in 1956. Might be interesting to know if there are anymore out there who participated - may just find long-lost friends." -Christie Sullivan Reeves, AHS 1956
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"Hello Butch, A lot of your Readers seem to be interested in the old City Drug Store. Maybe they would like to see this photo again that I sent you in 2001. This was me in white apron and the other boy was a friend of mine (now deceased, Leroy Hattensty)." LEEWAS@aol.com http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/CityDrugStore.jpg
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"Butch, my wife and I were looking around Wilson, Okla. a few days ago and I spotted what I think is an old freight elevator at the back of a two story building. I'm guessing that is what it is anyway, maybe some of your other readers can tell us for sure. I've attached photos of (1) the front of the bldg. located on west Main St., south side of the street, it's the two story bldg in the middle of the photo, (2) the rear of the bldg with the elevator, (3) close-up of the top of the elevator and (4) close-up of the bottom of the elevator. Like you I'm always looking for something to photograph and this thing just caught my eye." -C. Dwane and Terri Stevens http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/wilsonelevator2.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/wilsonelevator3.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/wilsonelevator4.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/wilsonelevator5.jpg
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"Butch, I remember back in the early 70's, the old Ardmore High School building had one of those escape slides on the back side. Of course, I don't think anyone used it because it seemed awfully unsafe. By the time they had the new high school built in '74, they had removed the old slide. Not sure it would have been that fun cause it seemed like you would have gotten you backside sliced up pretty good. I bet you that if you could get a hold of some of the old AHS Criterions, that you could find a picture of it."
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"Golly, I remember so many times seeing the Washita or Hickory Creek or Caddo Creek flooding. Heck, I remember Steven and I driving down one time to see the Red River flooding. That was really awesome, cause just a week afterwards, it had receded and we drove down to the I-35 bridge and I got some really neat photos. Take care and keep up the good work on the T & T. I sure appreciate reading it every Monday when I get to work. It keeps me from being so homesick."
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"Butch I am looking for picture of wanette, oklahoma during the years of 1933 to 50s do any of your readers have any from this time period. Thanks." -phdmom
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I received a great big surprise this week. A Reader in Texas gave me a 43 minute film her father made in 1936 of the construction going on at Lake Murray by the WPA and CCC workers. Maybe we should have an Initial Showing of this never before seen movie? More next week!!

I mentioned a few weeks ago about my electricity browning out in the evenings. Its still dimming down and coming back up every few minutes, really bad in the evenings. Thursday Oct 16th is the worse I've seen it, dont know if or when my electricity will just go out. Hope never. I talked to a main down on main street this week, he said the he was having brownouts too at his house, and has been for about 4 months. He said he's put surge protectors on everything he can trying to prepare for whatever. Something's going on.

"It's good news week,
Someone's dropped a bomb somewhere,
Contaminating atmosphere
And blackening the sky."

-Hedgehoppers Anonymous, 1965
http://www.geocities.com/fabgear6366/hedgehoppers.htm

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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Saturday October 11, 2003 T&T Weekly Vol 7 Issue 338

I was in Gainesville, Texas last month and noticed the Cooke County courthouse is doing some kind of remodeling on top. Workers had some scaffling up and a walkaround near the very top. They said it was mainly just a cleaning of the dome and all. The pigeons had done a number on it. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/gainesville91403a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/gainesville91403b.jpg 

This is the unusually slide fire escape on the south side of the Gainesville courthouse. I remember as a kid seeing these same type slides at the nursing home on 3rd NE where the present day Woodview Nursing Home at 1630 3rd NE. Actually the old, I think the name was... Evans N/H was just a few feet south of the present day Woodview N/H. I guess they still have one or two of these 'slide' fire escapes at the Veterans Center on South Commerce here in Ardmore too. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/gainesville91403c.jpg 

This is a closeup of the decor that adorns the Cooke County courthouse. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/gainesville91403d.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/gainesville91403e.jpg 

Speaking of Gainesville, Texas did you know there is a wonderful zoo there? I've got some pixs of that too and will put them in next weeks T&T.

I saw Love County resident Jack Drennen at the post here in Ardmore this week. He had just returned from a car show in Decatur, Texas with his 1979 VW Super Beatle. He won First Prize! But then Jack also won First Prize at the Eureka Springs, Arkansas show back on the first weekend of September. So his classic '79 convertible is making a real showing everywhere it goes! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/drennen3a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/drennen3b.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/drennen3c.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/drennen3d.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/drennen3e.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/drennen3f.jpg 

Decauter, Texas (Wise County) is about 50 miles west of Denton, Texas. Jack told me when you get about 15 miles from Decatur, all you can see is that beautiful 1896 Romanesque Revival courthouse that looks like old castle on the Decatur town square. It sits on a hilltop. The link below show this courthouse and all her glory. Be sure and click on the color insets on the photo on the right to see a detail of the part of the building. http://www.3dphoto.net/stereo/world/united_states/south/courthouses/wise_main.html http://www.cviog.uga.edu/Projects/gainfo/courthouses/decaturCH.htm

Speaking of courthouses, a Reader notified me this week that I do not have a pix of Oklahoma's Stephens County (Duncan, Oklahoma) on my webshots.com albums. Boy, that is one that slipped by me. But they did send me a photo of not only the Stephens county courthouse as it is today, but also a photo of the one that was torn down in 1968. The photos are in the Mailbag below.

Electricians have the new lights installed on the outside of the Carter County Courthouse. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/carterlights03a.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/carterlights03d.jpg

Back in the 1920s my uncle Abe Carmon and his wife Pearl lived at 1117 4th NE here in Ardmore. He and his nephew Howard Heath opened Ardmore's first miniature gold course near C Street NE and Highway 199 east. This would be just west of the railroad underpass on the north side of the highway where a vacant convenience store stands now. In 1999 I mentioned my uncle's miniature golf course and show a photograph of it too. What I didn't notice in the photo at that time, was the word "course" was spelled "coarse" on their bulding. I dont know if back in those days that spelling was used, or if this was just a plain old mistake in the spelling on someone's part??? http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/golf20.jpg  http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/golf20b.jpg

A friend of mine has been over in Iraq the past month or so. He just returned and brought me a genuine Iraqi $250 bill with madman Saddam himself on the front of it. Its worth about 3 cents. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/saddam03a.jpg  http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/saddam03b.jpg 

Devils Den was the hot stop this week on my webshot.com albums. That album had 161 hits with a total of 1,278 accumlation for all the albums. http://community.webshots.com/user/oklahomahistory

A Reader sent me an email this week telling about a website by National Geographic on maps. There are several categories, but one is historical maps. Pretty neat! http://plasma.nationalgeographic.com/mapmachine/

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Butch, seeing the posting on the Criterion year book of Ardmore High School reminded me of Ms. Doris Duston's 3-ring circus she used to produce each year. Fantastic production with all the high school taking part. I wish we had camcorders back then. She really knew how to organize things. It was usually put on in the civic auditorium for 2 or 3 nights."
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"I'm very interested in Roy Miller's photos of Big Canyon, and I have a question that Roy (or maybe Dwayne Stevens) can answer for me. One of the photos ("bigcanyon7.jpg") shows a rail vehicle sitting on a rail line beside the Washita River (which appears to be running high and fast). I assume that the two foreground tracks, plus the track that the gondolas are sitting on, are Dolese sidings. Is the track that the rail vehicle is sitting on the ATSF mainline? If Roy has any more photos of this area I would very much love to get a copy." Ron McFarlane bearmcf@alphalink.com.au http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/bigcanyon7.jpg
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"I enjoy your weekly journals. They bring back many memories. Here are locations of three neighborhood grocery stores that I remember back in the 30's. One was Kyles Grocery on "C" st. N. W. btw 2nd and 3rd avenues. It was a nice little store. Mr. Kyle and his wife lived next door to the store. Another store which was a little larger and did a good business was Seagroves Grocery on "E" st. N.W., near the Franklin School. Mr. Seagroves gave credit to his customers. Unfortunately, many did not pay up. Then there was a tiny little store on the corner of 10th and "A" st. N. W. We called the proprietor "Old man Holmes" We would buy R. C. Colas there or a loaf of bread. These stores were very convenient for an item or two. But for weekly shopping, Mother would go to the A&P downtown."
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"I was just catching up on last week's T&T, which I missed reading at the time. The person who listed the Carter County country stores in the 50's didn't get out to the far west end of the county. My folks ran the Ward's store in Wirt (Ragtown) from 1939 until my dad died in 1954, and my mom ran it until she sold out in 1956. There was also Duke's Grocery, our friendly competitor down the street, where Donald Duke still has a feed store. Both stores were in old sheet-iron buildings, built on 2x4's on 24" centers, with NO insulation, and were sealed only with old 3/8 inch sheetrock or "beaver-board"; talk about cold in the winter time!!

Also, regarding City Drug in Ardmore: It also had a wholesale division; or at least it carried enough stock so it could sell wholesale to small grocers around the county. We bought wholesale drugs and sundries from for our store quite regularly. One very frightening experience I remember was early in 1958 when my wife was in her first trimester with our first daughter, and caught the German measles (a variety also called "three-day measles" which hardly slowed down the activities of a "normal" person, but which were potentially dangerous to a first-trimester fetus). I took my wife to Dr. Safley in Healdton for a gamma globulin shot, but he didn't have enough to give her, so I drove to Ardmore to get another 10 cc's from City Drug. I still have the old check stub book showing the $33.35 I paid to City Drug; and I also paid Doc Safley another $8-$10 for the two office calls and all the medicine he had; all of which totaled quite a bit of money for a couple of college kids in a day when $125 would pay the O. B. bill for a whole pregnancy and delivery!" -Keith Ward, Oklahoma City
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"Hey Butch, another interesting edition of T & T. I have been following the many articles about old grocery stores in our area, & was wondering if any of your readers had information to share on the Brock, Ok. general store/post office(S. of Lone Grove, Ok. approximately 4 miles). It was owned & operated by Isaac N. "Ike" Brock, around 1896/1897. Uncle Ike took on a partner for a brief time, by the last name of Smith. I would be especially interested in any pictures."
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"Have you had anyone show an interest in Dixie, Oklahoma (Stephens Co)? Only the cemetery is left. Its a few miles north of Ringling."
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"Butch, Here is a photo of the "FORT WORTH DOUGHBOYS." This would be the forerunner of the Light Crust Doughboys. I can remember when the Light Crust Doughboys came to Ardmore in late 30s and played at Central Park from back of their Bus. It was specially equipped for these tours." Top L to R: Bob Wills Milton Brown Bottom L to R: Clifton Johnston Durwood Brown http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/ftwdoughboys.jpg
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"A very interesting train trip for young and old of any age. You don't get a chance to see and ride a Vintage Train very often and this is a close to Ardmore location. I'm sending some photos of the Tarantula Train that I took at the Fort Worth Stockyards Station on Friday, October 3, 2003." LEEWAS@aol.com http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/tarantulatrain2.jpg  http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/tarantulatrain3.jpg  http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/tarantulatrain4.jpg  http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/tarantulatrain5.jpg  http://tarantulatrain.com/depot.asp
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"Stephens Co Courthouse 1921-1968 Duncan, Ok "Celebrating 100 Years of Heritage" June 27th - 1892-1992 official post card of Main Street Duncan, Inc We are in the process of constructioning a new jail so the back of the courthouse is still a work site. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/stephens1921.jpg 

The Stephens County courthouse today. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/stephensco03a.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/stephensco03b.jpg
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"Butch, is that water running through there? As in, flash flood? Couldn't really tell from the photo." http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/bigcanyon6.jpg
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"Do you know where I can find the names of the people who died in Ardmore's 1895 fire?"
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"Here is a picture of my folks store in Wirt, which I wrote you about last week. This was taken early in 1942." -Keith Ward, OKC http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos3b/WardsStoreWirt.jpg
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The Connect Oklahoma Listserver has grown to over 100 subscribers! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/connectoklahoma.html

I've got a few coins I'm trying to sell. If you know anyone interested, let them know. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/coins.html

"Nothing is so easy as to deceive oneself; for what we wish, we readily believe." - Demosthenes

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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Saturday October 4, 2003 T&T Weekly Vol 7 Issue 337

A Reader brought me by a real piece of Ardmore history this week. It is a 1928/1929 Ardmore High School criterion. Back in those days the criterions were really made different than the modern ones of today. This particular criterion is 18 inches by 12 inches, about 25 pages in length, and printed on newspaper. It is in pretty rough condition, but still readable! http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/ahscriterion1929.jpg

Back in 1999 we talked about the silo north of Mannsville, Oklahoma and the tree that was growing in it years ago. Joyce Franks took a photograph of it back in the 80s and thats the photo we talked about in 1999. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/silotree.jpg 

Back in May 2002 Dwane Stevens sent in an email with 3 photos of this same silo:

"Butch, you've had some messages about the movie "Dillinger" in your newsletter so I bought a DVD copy from "Movies Unlimited" via the Internet recently. Nice to see scenes of the Carter County Court House, main street Dougherty and many others from our area. The "shoot out" scene in Dougherty is my favorite and the DVD version is really great because with the digital zoom feature of a DVD player, it's possible to zoom in on background features that you wouldn't otherwise see. As in the Dougherty scene, while in still mode, you can zoom in on the railroad crossing way in the background and see the cross buck etc. Anyway, after viewing the movie I decided to drive to the Washita River bridge north of Mannsville that was also in the movie. It still looks about the same as in the movie. While in the area I shot some photos of the "Silo with the Tree" growing out the top. I know you have posted photos of it before but I shot two photos from the inside of the silo. One shows the base of the tree and the other shows the top and there's one outside shot as well. Just thought your subscribers might enjoy an "inside" shot! Ha! As always, your newsletter is great and your hard work appreciated by all. Thanks." -Dwane Stevens http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/silods2.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/silods3.jpg  http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/silods4.jpg 

This week I received a photo of another tree growing inside a silo. Its located near the little town of Roff, Oklahoma (south of Ada). http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/roffsilotree.jpg 

McAlister, Oklahoma is the county seat of Pittsburg county. A Reader took this pix of the bell at the All Saints Episcopal Church in McAlister. This bell looks old to me, and I bet there is a great story behind it! http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/mcalisterepiscopalbell.jpg

The next five photos are not exactly in Oklahoma, but since many of you are railroad buffs, I knew you'd like these relics from the past. This number 4003 steam locomotive is just across the Oklahoma state line at Ft Smith, Arkansas. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/ftsmithloco.jpg 

This is a well preserved Katy Railroad caboose on display at Ft Smith. It reminds me of the one in downtown Purcell, Oklahoma. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/ftsmithcaboose.jpg 

Here is another caboose at Ft Smith. It needs some restoration. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/unionpacificcaboose.jpg 

This is a MKT pullman car on display at Ft Smith. Its like the 1,200 pullmans that were used during WWII for the mass transport of troops around the country. They were custom made and would sleep 30 soldiers and one porter. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/ftsmithpullman.jpg 

This is three more photos taken by Roy Miller of OKC. He's retired from Dolese Company and worked Big Canyon rock crusher south of Dougherty in the Arbuckle Mountains. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/bigcanyon5.jpg  http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/bigcanyon6.jpg  http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/bigcanyon7.jpg 

If you're looking for an item, there's no need to resort to the Yellow Pages. Just go to http://www.google.com and type the one word category followed by the area code. I typed in "photographs 580-223- and here is what google found first: Photographs By Lawrence 311 W Main St. Marietta, OK 73448 (580) 276-4670

Webshots look-sees more than doubled this week with over 2,300 Hits! Awesome! http://community.webshots.com/user/oklahomahistory < p> This is the Future: Assume we can build a system that can carry the equivalent of 6 freeway lanes of passengers for less than $1 million per mile (installed, complete with vehicles and all electrification). http://www.skytran.net/01Homepage/Introduction.htm

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Butch, you left out my uncle's store in your list of rural grocery stores. Clyde Minter had the grocery store out on Hwy 70 (I think) where the new car wash is now. It was rock as was the house my aunt, uncle and cousins lived in right next to it. The grocery store burned but I don't know what year. The house was moved several years ago to a place west of the Plainview School. When I was a kid, Saturdays were always spent at Uncle Clyde's store. About all I remember about it was in the back of the store there were bags of flour (probably 20# bags) and they were all different prints of material. "Flour Sack" dresses were some of my first clothes before we moved to Ardmore and I started to school. Ah, memories!!!!!!!! -danna
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"butch, I don't believe U. U forgot to list nix's grocery as one of the gro stores in lone grove way back then. how could U forget that 2 story white bldg. I don't even know what all nadine nix had in there."
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"I really appreciate This and That, read it faithfully every week and learn something new about the place I called home for a number of years in the thirties and forties while growing up. It still has a place in my heart. I also read the Ardmoreite on line whenever I find the time for news of former schoolmates (AHS '43), etc. I appreciated the note about Andy Arnold and Arnold's Grocery at Springer, named that by Andy's dad, Cecil Arnold. He bought the store after he retired from the mail/freight run to Springer/Woodford/Milo and Graham. He was a wonderful guy and a friend to everyone. They don't make 'em like Cecil anymore. I don't know who ran the store before him or what it was called. I don't suppose there is anyone out there who remembers the store at the crossroads at Woodford built by my grandfather, William (Horace) Greer, and after his death in the early thirties, operated by others. I loved to visit it as a child when I got to take my pick from the penny candy (about the size of a quarter bar now) in the big glass case. It was a General Store with gas, ice, feed in the store room, and anything else he could sell to make a living. At different times he cut hair, raised chickens, roasted and packaged peanuts, and rented a billboard to advertisers. Just like Walmart in everything but profits." -Carolyn Frei cfrei@lewiston.com
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"Butch, I grew up in Countyline. I lived on the Carter County side. The school was across the road on the Stephens County side. I went to the first grade there in 1944. It consolidated with Alma and was closed in 1946 or 1947. It was built by the WPA but the plaque is gone now as is the big bell. Countyline opened the first post office about 1929 as the oil boom town grew up overnight. It is a ghost town now. All that is left is a little store and the post office. I am sending a picture of the school. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/countyline3.jpg

This the town of County Line, on the Carter County side, that was in the Stephens County History that was published several years ago. The town burned in 1950." -Wanema Womack Bullard http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/countylineok.jpg
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"Dear Butch, On Oct. 18, 2003, Madonna Eskew Pumphrey will be inducted into the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City. She will receive the Tad Lucas Award. Madonna's grandmother, Florence Randolph, was World Champion Bronc Rider and Trick Rider in the late1920s, teaching her to ride a horse at an age when most people are learning to walk. Her grandfather, Colonel Jim Eskew joined Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show as a child and went on to become a pioneer rodeo producer. Horseback at the ripe old age of two, Madonna developed a love for the lifestyle passed down to her by the generations before her. Trick roping came naturally for Madonna and lessons from her World Champion Trick Roping father, Jim Eskew,Jr., didn't hurt either. In her twenties, Madonna worked for several Rodeo Stock Contractors such as; Harry Knight, Mike Cervi, Harry Vold, and Butler Brothers. She worked as a timer and carried a flag in the grand entry. Until her early thirties, Madonna crisscrossed the United States working rodeos and enjoying the freedom that her profession allowed her. Children and animals have always held a special place in Madonna's heart. After retiring from the rodeo circuit, Madonna volunteered her time to help troubled children in the Ardmore area with an organization called "CASA", Court Appointed Special Advocates. Courage, passion, and generosity of spirit are all qualities of a true cowboy. These things along with a sense of humor, talent and a beauty that's evident on both inside and out make up Madonna Eskew Pumphrey. Congratulations Madonna!"
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"Butch, I enjoy your T&T very much. I know that others look forward to your newsletter each weekend as much as I do. I was wondering if anyone out there remembers a automobile wreck several years ago. it took place on Highway 7 someplace between Hinnepin and Davis. I believe a truck hit a car head on and killed a mother, her son and grandson. I believe her name was Kate Hasting. Any information on this terrible accident and lost of life would greatly be appreciated." email Pat sanfordjl@aol.com
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"hi butch. my mother inlaw was a Rhyne from Allen, and Stringtown Ok. her grandma was Olllie Rhyne. her dad was Winfried Rhyne." -Pam Potter BPo5622338@aol.com
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"Andy Arnold's father, C C Arnold, ran the Arnold grocery store in Springer before Andy took over. I know there was an Arnold running it in the early 40's." -Nelda True
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"Dear Butch, The Post Office has a new service for mailing material. It is called Mailing Online. There might even be a way for you to qualify as a non-profit!" http://www.usps.com/mailingonline/faq_print.htm
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"regarding Karla Johnson's grandfather James Minor Spurlock who was killed in a fall from a train in 1935, Here's the rest of the story: The newly widowed Mrs Spurlock managed to raise all 9 of those children by managing the cafe at the bus station which was near the present Cook's paint building and there was no welfare system, salvation army, social security system, etc. She did it by long hours. The children made good grades and grew up to be productive citizens. What a Heroine!!!" vdsvb@brightok.net
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"The bell fell into the burning timbers and planks and was melted into a shapeless mass. This metal was sent to the Andrew McNeeley Bell Company, West Troy, New York, original casters of the bell, and it was recast with the same inscriptions and now hangs at Park Hill Presbyterian Church, Cherokee County, Oklahoma." http://www.cherokee.org/Culture/HistoryPage.asp?ID=36
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"the chickasaw name for blaze is kila (ke-lah). the chickasaw word for fade is masali (mah-sah-le) you could call him Masali Kila."
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"Do you know of any murders at Wheelock Female Seminary/Wheelock Academy (McCurtain County)?" http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgenweb/schools/county/choctawnat/wheelock.htm
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"Hello to all, We took a day trip to Texas on Saturday. Toured the state park of Fort Griffin. It is a lot of fun to walk those places we have read so much about. All of Josh's western books talk of all these places. You can just see the indians hiding behind the hills, and imagine the buffalo ranging out for miles and miles. The cattle drives to Kansas. Very colorful history in this area. The tress are magnificent! To check them out, click on the image or photo album title link to the right! Enjoy." -Susie http://community.webshots.com/album/92310455iiAJua
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"Dear Butch: Mentions of City Drug bring back memories. I was a good fiend of Mr and Mrs Vickers. They had two sons that were pharmacists. I was a member of the Oklahoma State Board of Pharmacy from 1965 to 1972.....and sometime, I don't remember the exact date, I think it was about 1966 we hired Bill Vickers, their younger pharmacist son, as our Executive Secretary. I have no idea where he is today, if someone knows I would like to have his address." -Pharmacist Kenneth Eck, Healdton kenlorek@texhoma.net
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"My name is Gary G. Kilgore. I am a displaced Okie. My parents relocated me to California in 1948. I am of the "Kilgore's" of Chickasha, OK. I was born in 1942 and lived there off & on until 1948. My family's plot in "Rose" Cemetery will attest to the length & size of our family. The first family member to move to Grady Co. was Willis Solomon my Great Great Grandfather. He relocated there from Alabama shortly after the Civil War. I became aware of you & the "T&T" via my cousin who was born & raised in Ardmore. He is Neal Freeman & is retired and living in Ardmore at this time. His family has roots back to the "Oil Boom" days. He has been sending me your "T&T' for some time now. I've enjoyed the photos & stories very much. I am somewhat familiar with Ardmore since my family lived there for a short time in the mid 1940's and I've visited there frequently, my last trip was in 1996/7. I found one of my most memorable was in 1959 just prior to my entrance into the Navy. My cousins & I had a heck of a summer that year. There was an entrepreneur by the name of "J.B. Ponder" who I was wondering what ever happened to him." -Gary G. Kilgore P.O. Box 1099 Victorville, Ca. 92393 E-Mail ARIES-G@WebTV.Net
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"Does anyone have any information on a Sulphur High schoolmate of mine? Maiden name was Irma Lee Williams. She had a brother named Gwen. Last I heard, she lived in Pennsylvania. Would appreciate it. Thanks." Alleda Hale avhl1962@hotmail.com
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"The Evening News, Ada, Oklahoma. June 20, 1905 Two places in this paper about the train wreck...

Ardmore, I.T. June 19, 1905 Traffic on the Santa Fe was delayed about twenty hours by the wrecking of a freight train south of this city. Seventeen cars loaded with lumber and ties were ditched and much damage resulted. No one was injured.

Escursionists Wreck-Bound Ardmore I.T June 19, 1905 Seventeen carloads of lumber on the Santa Fe were wrecked south of here yesterday afternoon, delaying traffic on this division for twenty four hours. A crowd of fifteen hundred Sunday Texas excursionists to Arbuckle mountains north of here had to remain over night."
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"The Evening News, Ada, Oklahoma. January 11, 1911 Duncan Ready for New Road Duncan, Okla. Jan 9, 1911 A letter was received in Duncan today from parties at Lawton who are interested in building the proposed line of railroad from Lawton to Ardmore via Duncan. The letter states that all financial arrangements had been made and all that was now necessary for the fulfillment of the project was getting the people of the places together and discuss the bonuses asked by the promoters. Some years ago Duncan, by subscription, raised a bonus of many thousand dollars for this road and stands ready today to do its part."
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"The Evening News, Ada, Oklahoma. May 23, 1900 Excursion rates Dallas---May 22 to June 2, for trains arriving as late as 3:15 p.m., limited to return same day $2.50. May 28-June 3, limit June 3; rate $3.30

Houston-- May 17 & 18, limit 20th, rate $5.00

several other towns listed including Louisville KY $20.70
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"I attended Ardmore Junior High from the autumn of ' 72 to the spring of ' 75. I remember attending many dances at Teen Town which was held at the YWCA. As I recall there was always a very good turnout and everyone seemed to have a really good time. I was also one of the many local teens who spent alot of time hanging out at the Old roller rink at the former armory building, bowling at the old Ken Cliff bowling lanes where I also worked at the restaurant, watching movies on many weekend nights at the old Skyview drive in movies or at the Tivioli, or just cruising around on the " drag". During the time while I was attending Ardmore High I spent many weekend nights at football games at Walker Stadium performing with the band. I miss the old times but will always treasure the memories." -Roxanne
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"I always enjoy your column, though much of it I don't relate to. I lived in Ardmore only a few years between the late thirties and the mid fifties. I also lived at Woodford and Springer briefly at different times, and enjoyed the article about Andy Arnold. I knew his father, Cecil Arnold, who owned the store previous to Andy. Cecil bought it after he retired from carrying the mail and freight from Ardmore to Graham. Cecil and his wife Gladys were wonderful people. He was eternally patient and accommodating to everyone. I don't suppose there is anyone out there old enough to know anything about my Grandad, William Horace Greer, who operated a general store at the Woodford crossroads in the twenties and maybe earlier. He would sell anything that was needed -- besides the grocery staples, he had ice, gasoline, feed by the sack, you name it. At different times he acted as a barber, erected a signboard for rental, hatched and raised spring chickens, and roasted and packed peanuts. Others had the store after him. As a child I was allowed to reach into the big glass candy case for a penny Baby Ruth or Butterfinger, one that would probably cost a quarter today." -Carolyn Frei
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"Butch, Here is a picture of Countyline Baptist Church. It is on the Carter County., side and across the street is Stephens County." -Wanema Womack Bullard http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/countylinebaptist.jpg
------------------------------------------------------------------------ Les Gilliam: "Friends, I'm leaving tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept 30 for Silver Dollar City in Branson and will not be checking my emails until Oct 13 when I return. My band and I will be doing three shows per day Oct 1-5 and 8-12. Also, we will play a family dance, open to the public, on Monday night, Oct 6, starting at 7pm, at the Compton Ridge Campground Hall in Branson, near Silver Dollar City. Some of our upcoming public performances include the Quail Valley Fun Barn in Winfield, Kansas on Oct 18, a solo show in Herington, Kansas on Nov 8 and the WMA Festival in Wichita on Nov 13-16 at which I will perform several times. For more information about my schedule, refer to my website." http://www.lesgilliam.com
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"I believe Oct 21st, on the Discovery Channel is supposed to be a documentary on mass murders/serial killers, which is supposed to include the Nannie Doss story. As you may or may not know, she was the only mass murderer from Tulsa Back in the 1950's. She killed her husbands (and other assorted family members), but with the husbands it was because they were not "romantic enough"!!! She was sentenced and died in prison here in OKlahoma of leukemia. She had her cell scattered with love stories and romance magazines." http://www.who2.com/nanniedoss.html http://www.crimelibrary.com/serial6/doss/
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"The Heartland Flyer was a blur this morning when it flew through Overbrook, Okla. (just south of Ardmore). I finally had a chance to get out to photograph some trains on the Red Rock Sub today. I decided to go to Overbrook to catch the Heartland Flyer coming through. Some of the signal maintainers were at Overbrook and other spots along the way setting up to run some timing tests when the Flyer was to come through. When it came through one of the guys said, "boy, did he have the hammer down!", indeed, I could hardly believe it myself. I tried to catch up with him on old Hwy 77 but No Way! I'll have to go from 100 to 800 ISO film speed now! Ha!" -Dwane Stevens, Ardmore
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"This picture is of a butcher shop in Ardmore, OK. Cole Pate is on the R/H side of photo." http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/colepatebutcher.jpg
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"Did you know that the first 20 volumes of Chronicles of Oklahoma are online? Click on one and find the index for that entire year with beginning page number. Wonderful! Pictures and everything." -Voncille http://digital.library.okstate.edu/Chronicles/bookshelf.html
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"Here's a question maybe some of your readers could answer for me: Where, in Paul's Valley or Ardmore, was there a place where musical concerts were given in 1899-1900? Supposedly my husband's grandparents met when James Ashby Boyd attended a concert at which Juanita Allen was playing her violin. I'd love to be able to find out about any "music halls" that existed then. Any help out there?" -Donna S. Boyd momdsb@summit.net
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I've started bagging peanuts. I'm selecting some history trivia to put on each bag and printing labels. So far there are four different trivias printed on 4 by 3 inch labels and attached to poly bags, then one scoop of roasted peanuts, in the shell, sealed in each bag. If you see me around town, hollar at me and I'll see you get a free bag of peanuts! Hard to beat a good tasting peanut when you need something to chomp on. Remember how we dropped them in a bottle of coca cola? http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos3b/oncetime92803.jpg 

Does anyone remember the lady's name who use to read a one minute history spot in the mornings on a radio station in Ardmore about 20 years ago? She always started each spot with "Once upon a time......" I always looked forward to hearing what her next history lesson would cover. Each 1 minute spot started out with a few seconds of some music, and then ended the last few seconds with that same music. What was that song?

The past two weeks we've seen 100 people subscribe to the listserver! And there's been some really good messages posted. If you havn't subscribed yet, then you've missed some good posts from all over the country. Hope to see you at the ConnectOklahoma Listserver. Its free, and fun! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/connectoklahoma.html

Take Me Out To the Ball Game - 1908 version

"Katie Casey was base ball mad,
Had the fever and had it bad;
Just to root for the home town crew,
Ev'ry sou Katie blew.
On a Saturday, he young beau
Called to see if she'd like to go,
To see a show but Miss Kate said,
"No, I'll tell you what you can do."

"Take me out to the ball game,
Take me out with the crowd.
Buy me some peanuts and cracker jack,
I don't care if I never get back,
Let me root, root, root for the home team,
If they don't win it's a shame.
For it's one, two, three strikes, you're out,
At the old ball game."

Katie Casey saw all the games,
Knew the players by their first names;
Told the umpire he was wrong,
All along good and strong.
When the score was just two to two,
Katie Casey knew what to do,
Just to cheer up the boys she knew,
She made the gang sing this song:

"Take me out to the ball game,
Take me out with the crowd.
Buy me some peanuts and cracker jack,
I don't care if I never get back,
Let me root, root, root for the home team,
If they don't win it's a shame.
For it's one, two, three strikes, your out,
At the old ball game."

Author: Jack Norworth
Composer: Albert Von Tilzer
Published on: 1908, 1927
Published by: York Music Company

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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