"This & That" News - July 2006

If you're looking for a certain article I wrote in a past issue of "This & That" you might find it faster by doing a "search" with your browser. With Netscape just click your mouse at the top at EDIT and then FIND and type in the word or words you're looking for. If you use Internet Explorer, just click on EDIT and then FIND ON THIS PAGE to do a search.

Below is July 6, 2002 to July 27, 2006.

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July 26, 2006 Circulation over 5,000 Vol 10 Issue 496

I can now report that all or at last all I know, those buried in the Confederate section of Rose Hill Cemetery are now online and searchable from my website. There are about 425 names contained in 5 files which include rows 1 through 25. And in a few weeks the big search engines like google. com and yahoo.com will have indexed the names and people using the world wide web search engines will find these names when looking for their kinfolk or whatever research they are doing. Any you are searching for a name among those 425 listed, just click on the pull down menu on the right hand side of the pico box and select "Search Grave Markers" instead of "Search Our Website". Its that easy! Click Here

I told in last week's T&T that sometimes I run across something unusual and interesting when entering the names of those 425 buried in the Veteran Section. Last weekend I found in Rows 24 and 25 the names of two soldiers of the Civil War, but low and behold they were no on the Confederate side, but the North. I dont know the story behind these two souls but I imagine it would be very interest to learn all the details. I would assume they lived their last days at the Veteran Home on South Commerce and when they passed away, for reasons unclear to me now, they would be buried in the Confederate Section. I would tend to believe that even those as young adults fighting for the north in a war that had this country divided, these two yankee soldiers were loved so much in the end days by those who were taking care of them here, they were allowed to be buried in the Confederate section. There is very little info on the grave markers, not even birth and death dates. Maybe someone can help us find out more on these two individuals.

William P. Chaffin, Co H. 74th Ohio Infantry Click Here

James Ousley, Co K 1st Iowa Cavalry Click Here

We've had several mentions of the old Whittington Park swimming pool that was located just north of the Hardy Murphy Coliseum years ago. Peggy Evers sent in a couple of great photos of the old swimming pool! I guess the one thing I remember is that great big tree that was right in the middle of the asphalt street that ran in front of the swimming pool. People traveling east went around the south side of the tree, and people going west went around the north side of the tree. The City removed the tree about a month after a guy who lived just south of me when I was growing up crashed his car into the tree in Feb 1984 and died from his injuries. Click Here - Click Here

David Cathey in Pauls Valley sent in a pic of the temperature on his thermometer on July 20th. HOT Click Here

About 100 of my T&T readers who have AOL accounts, their T&T bounced back to me last week. Dont know why..... its always one problem or another with AOL treating me as spam.

Last week a Reader sent in a picture of Dug's Grill on Main Street in Ardmore taken in the 60s. I found that same pic that was sent to me in 2002, just a better quality photo, for those of you wanting to print it out. Click Here

A T&T Reader here in Ardmore brought up something this week I had not noticed concerning this winter's weather. If you look on the north side of the trees, you will see heavy accumulation of moss growing. 30 years ago Native American Indian Buster Ned from this area said if there is moss on the north side of the trees, we are in for a bad weather. Time will tell.

From my March 6, 1999 Issue: In the 70s Ardmore had someone better then a meteorologist when it came to predicting rain. He was a full blood Choctaw Indian by the name of Buster Ned. I never personally met Buster Ned, but I'd see him around town many times during those years. Buster Ned had instilled within himself, this uncanny ability to predict rain. One of his main signs for forecasting came from the hoot owl. There were other signs he'd look for, but the hoot owl proved to be the most reliable. In the late afternoons, around 4pm, if he heard the hoot owl on the land he lived on near Durwood, Oklahoma, he knew it would rain within two or three days. He was renowned throughout the area and respected by all. Buster Ned was quoted many times by Ardmoreite columnist "Mac" McGalliard. Buster was born to Frank and Elizabeth Parker Ned in the Marshall county community of Simpson, Oklahoma March 9, 1924. Here is a pic taken of a painting of Buster Ned that hangs in the Money Services business, #6 B Street Northwest, here in Ardmore. Click Here

"...Buster Ned was also an interpreter for people who only spoke Chickasaw. I remember him serving at the Courthouse as an interpreter for some people about twenty years ago."

From January 29, 2000: "Butch, in the Ardmoreite, dated January 21, 1979, there is an article about Dr. Washington and Buster Ned. It seems the American Trail series filmed Buster Ned and Mac McGalliard telling the story of the Kwanakuasha. In fact one of the pictures shows Mac holding a book about the story of the Kwanakuasha, I guess. My clipping of this is torn and faded not suitable for scanning but I did have the picture of the Dr. and the little man standing on the table. You probably remember this article." Click Here

I havent mentioned my webshot photos lately. Its still getting record hits, and it interesting to see which photos are being looked at the most. Would you believe Devils Den at Tishomingo is still ahead of the bunch with over 12,000 views, and Brown Springs coming in second with over 9,000 views. Click Here

I received a surprise phone call last week from Ray Simpson of El Reno, Past President of the Oklahoma Emergency Medical Technician Association. The group was holding their annual meeting here in Ardmore at the new Convention Center. Since I was the Founder of the association back in 1974, Ray Simpson, CCEMTP, RN of El Reno, wanted to invite me to their evening luncheon and awards banquet. Little did I know I was going to received an award, and what an honor it was too. The Oklahoma EMT Association will always be close to my heart even though its been 20 years since I worked on the ambulance. Click Here Click Here

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Readers might like to hear about the pending Morris Garage (MG) auto production. It even made the LA Times, but was very brief. A buddy sent me the details from the Daily Oklahoman, so I am in the know." Click Here
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John Hanson, first president of the United States (not George Washington). Click Here
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First Furniture Store in Ardmore: Glenn-Bourland. Lawson "Nus" Glenn (1857-1922) moved his family from Wellington, Collingsworth County, Texas to Ardmore in 1901 and opened the first furniture store in Ardmore that flourished until the 1950s. Camilla Bourland Glenn (1866-1851) lived in Ardmore for 50 years where she raised her 5 children who were married in the Carter County area and are buried in the Rose Hill Cemetery. ..The Glenn children were: George Tate Glenn (1885-1962); Jewell Glenn Stringer (1887-1982); Elmo Currie Glenn (1890-1964); Aliena Glenn Chapin Withers (1894-1975); Mary Ellen Glenn Harrison (1903-1993). Patti Adkins-Rochette, prochette@Juno.com www.BourlandCivilWar.com Click Here - Click Here - Click Here - Click Here - Click Here
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"Hi Butch, Was just reading about your hot weather. Be grateful you still have electrical power. In the St. Louis area, we are not so fortunate. The power went out last Wednesday night about 7:30. I was one of the lucky ones and power was restored to my area about 9:30 pm Thursday. My son's family is not so fortunate. They are still without power and the electric company is predicting that it could be as long as 11 days before power will be restored to some areas. My son said that the heat doesn't bother him because he grew up in Oklahoma and he was used to it." -Nelda True in St Louis, MO nftrue@swbell.net
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"Dear Butch, You don't have to go back to the Dust Bowl days for an extremely hot summer in Ardmore. You need only go back to the summer of 1955 or 1956. It was the hottest weather I ever saw in Ardmore. They emptied City Lake and pumped Lake Ardmore dry to supply Ardmore's water needs. There was strict water rationing that summer. I can't remember, but I think the high temperature that summer was 116. It was Africa hot. There was serious talk about cloud seeding but I can't remember whether they did it There were a lot of funny proposals made to stimulate rain that year. Someone older can probably remember what happened in Ardmore's adult world that I had no knowledge of. The city built a pipeline from Lake Ardmore to City Lake. I can't remember whether they took any water from the Noble Lake which Lake Ardmore fed over the spillway. They put the pump station at the spillway at Lake Ardmore and drained as much of the lake as they could. Before my sister and I started school in town our family lived at Lake Ardmore for about three years and it was difficult for me to watch our playground destroyed by the city's need for water. But the rains returned and the lake filled up again and that episode was forgotten. This was also during the polio scare and we were not allowed outside after about noon because of the heat." -Monroe Cameron
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'We had a ground breaking for our Duncan, Oklahoma Senior site. This is for all Native Americans over the age of 60 and have a CDIB card. It was well over 100 degrees. My family the Lavers lived in Ardmore. My dad says Overton, Lavers owned the skating rink at Lake Murry Park in or around the early 1900's. My dad says he had some beautiful horses also. Also my Grandfather Whitfield was in the 1915 explosion there. He got in the back of his wagon and his horse took him home. Sometime you need to go out to the senior site there on Chickasaw Blvd. and interview the seniors. You could probably write many a story off of them. My dad at 85 is so proud. He flew the Blimps during WW ll and he tells everyone he sees about this. We are descendent of Edmund Pickens the last elected Chief of the Chickasaw Nation. So there are many tells to tell." -Kathleen
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"Sure made me homesick with the photo of the Comet Drive-In hamburger. Next to the Hamburger Inn, the burgers from the Comet Drive-In were the best!! I'm not sure if it's still on the menu, but I do remember when we were kids that daddy would get this huge, super sized burger from there that was big enough to feed both my brother and myself and neither of us could finish it. Not to mention the huge mound of french fries that we also shared. Just might have to make a trip back home just to get a Comet burger again. But think I'll wait until the temps cool off a bit. 110??!!!! Golly, geez and I thought the 107 heat index that we had in Fayetteville yesterday was hot! I don't miss the heat & humidity of Ardmore. Miss everything else, but not that. Try to stay cool and hydrated." -Your Arkie Friend, Kathi
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"The Wilson News February 1915.
We have more rain and mud. Will we ever get our crosswalks? What do you suppose a stranger thinks of a town that has not enough ambition to build a few crosswalks in the main part of town? Means and Lee have just completed a new plank walk on the Fifth Street side of their big store. We said when Dr. Darling moved his building from the corner of Sixth and Main that he couldn't take that fine cement sidewalk with him; but we failed to take into consideration the ingenuity of a man like Dr. Darling. One can't tell what that man is going to do. He has put men and teams at work digging up that walk and is having it replanted in front of the building on Main and Fifth. Contributor's note: Dr. Darling's building now houses the Wilson Historical Museum." -Mindy Taylor mindy@brightok.net
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"Butch, if fruit is not setting, use the powdered "pollen" bought at garden centers and dust on blooms per instructions on box. Some shade plants with opened burlap potato sacks. Also water late in evenings. -Jack
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"Just read your T&T. I really enjoy them. I want to ask a favor of you. The weekend of July 28, 29, and 30th the Gardner family reunion is being held at Lake Murray, and I want you to promise me the weather will be cooler. lol. Our family reunion started in 1977. We have one each year. We rent the whole camp ground where we can have a private beach for all the kiddies and swim and fish. Next year (07) we will celebrate our 30th year." -Opal (Gardner) Lee cty47619@centurytel.net
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"Here is an Autoharp I bought at Sulphur today. Don't know how old it is but it needs a little work. I was tickled to get it. Does anyone know anything about these let me know please?" dougwilliams@cableone.net Click Here
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"Butch, thanks for all your time and effort publishing T&T. I enjoy reading about things of interest in the Carter County area. I was raised in Wilson. My Dad, Roy Barrett was a barber in Wilson, later working for Oklahoma Pipeline Company. His parents owned and ran the Barrett's Cafe on South 5th Street (1 block south of Main Street) in Wilson. My Dad was killed on November 16, 1944, in WW II. I was 4 years of age and my brother Terry was born only 11 days prior to our Dad's death. For many years, I thought that our Dad had died in the Battle of the Bulge. After retiring in 1998, I began extensive research about my Dad, and his death and learned that he wasn't killed in the Battle of the Bulge, but in a little known battle that preceeded the Battle of the Bulge called The Battle of Huertgen Forest. In May 2000, my wife and I attended Memorial Day services at the Ardennes Military Cemetery in Belgium where our Dad is buried. Following the Memorial Day services, we went into the Huertgen Forest in Germany with a guide and went to the location where my Dad's remains were found (3 1/2 years after his death as he was missing in action until June 1947). It was the most moving experience in my life to be at the location where he was killed and his remains were found. Following the trip to Germany, I built a website, dedicated to my Dad and to all the men who served, were wounded or killed in the Battle of Huertgen Forest. If anyone is interested in the history of this battle, the website can be found at the link below. I am proud of my Dad and was honored when the memorial was erected in Ardmore honoring all those from Carter County who were killed in WW II. My Dad's name is proudly displayed in that memorial plaque." -Ken Barrrett Click Here
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"Mr. Bridges, FYI. You may not know this but there is one LARGE bell Located at the Lone Star School in Sapulpa that is used every day, when school is in session. I do not know of the origin of the bell but if you would like more info I could find out more for you. Here is the link for their home page with the bell." Click Here
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"Hi Butch, love your local history website. Lake Murray was opened to public fishing in June, 1938, and the day, long before sun-up, Lake Murray Drive was bumper-to Bumper traffic. It was really hard to find a place along the shore to throw in a line. Everyone caught fish; it must have been the greatest day of fishing for the most people, ever - a real BOOK OF RECORDS day. My dad, George Meason, managed the INDEPENDENT ICE CO on North "D" Street, and we sold out before noon, then started letting people store their fish in the vault, in wash tubs. We had to quit that pretty soon when we started to look and smell like FISHERMAN'S WHARF. At the end of the day we still had several un-claimed wash tubs, so we had a public fish-fry, at the plant, the next day. We neighborhood kids set up a bait stand at the intersiction of McLish & 77 hwy and made over $100 that week-end selling cray fish we had seined out of near-by ponds, notably Walker's Pond. I wonder if the DAILY ARDMOREITE had any articles about that opening week-end?" -Tom Meason, Tulsa, OK
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"Liked your site. Read with interest of the 1909 hanging in Ada. I read my father's copy of the book signed by my Great Uncle Welborn. When my dad was a boy in the 1930's he and his little brother would go stay with the Hopes in Ada and his Uncle Welborn would tell many stories of growing up in a "wild west town" and especially of the hanging he saw that day that he later write about. I'll have to ask my dad for the copy again to re-read. -Robert Hope, Tucker, GA www.solutionspc.com Click Here
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"This was at the stand of Brenneman's Produce in Guthrie, Ok. Vicky Brenneman had sliced open a Tomato and this is what she found. She put it on display for all to see. I thought this was awesome, to see something simple to uplift our lives and make us smile. (photo by Dennis Ober)." -Roy Kendrick Click Here
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"Here's a site that Pug Hawkins (former manager of the Ritz Theatre at Britton, Ok.) sent me. Lots of good information here." -Roy Click Here
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"I am looking for family information (we may be related). My grandmother was Margarette Elizabeth Bridges Lasiter, and she was the grandmother of Bertha Holley (first wife of Earl Payne). Reading through one of your web articles I found a lettter from Kirk Holley Smith, son of Britta Faye Holley Smith, a sister to Bertha. My dad worked for Mr.Payne at a grocery store at the corner of C and Tenth SE. I was looking for Wayne's obit when I found your very interesting web site. Do you know anything about my grandmother? My dad was related to a man called Cotton Bridges, and I remember him from when I was very young (I am 60 now). I don't know anything about her family, other than she was born in Mississippi, her dad born in North Carolina, and her mother in Tennessee. I believe she died in about 1943. My dad died in 1973. Bertha and Britta Faye's mother, Maud Holley, died around 1953. Again, I very much enjoyed reading your articles on the web. My dad also worked for Hammer's Grocery. Mrs. Hammer was also mentioned in your web site as teaching at Plainview School. I was a student at Jefferson and enjoyed reading about Mrs. Bridges, my second grade teacher. She would let me read books on the top book shelf, and always had treats for her students on Friday. Thanks for the trip down a pleasant memory lane. I hope you have written more,or intend to." -Leslie Lasiter Lavers lannlavers@sbcglobal.net
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"Let no guilty man escape., if it can be avoided. No personal considerations should stand in the way of performing a public duty." -Ulysses S. Grant Click Here

See everyone next week!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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July 20, 2006 Circulation over 5,000 Vol 10 Issue 495

As most of you know, here in Ardmore, Oklahoma its been so terribly hot. Friday July 21st is predicted to be the hottest yet with temps at 110 here. Then on Saturday the temps are suppose to drop below 100. That will be a great relief. People, animals, plants, and equipment could not take many more days in a row like it's been the past week. This is the worst heat wave we had in these parts since the Dust Bowl years of the 1930s. A lot of people are staying cool at the swimming pool here in Ardmore, so I thought I share some history on Ardmore's swimming at Whittington Park in the SE part of Ardmore which would later turn into a new pool at 3rd and F Street NE......

For many years the City of Ardmore owned and operated a large swimming pool in Whittington Park which was built before modern sanitation facilities were available. The pool had been leased out to private operators but, in 1948, failed to open because of inability to finance repairs. The following year the Kiwanis Club of Ardmore proposed they would operate the pool and the city granted the club a lease. Under a committee composed of Wilson Wallace, Joe W. Shinn, and M.C Rackets the pool operated for a full season at low admission prices with instruction given free by the Red Cross. The Kiwanis members cleaned and painted the pool, using their own funds. The pool was operated by the club from 1949 through 1954.

The club committee realized that a new modern pool was needed and in the winter of 1953 Wallace and Shinn, assured the same financial help if a workable program and proper plans and specifications could be prepared, went to work without any publicity. Wallace contacted various pool authorities including John A. Carrick of Dallas. Gradually, general plans as to size, equipment and other details were worked out. Harold Flood, architect, was contacted. Flood and Collins went to work preparing detailed plans and specifications.

It was necessary that a vehicle for financing and operation of the pool be established. The men again turned to the Kiwanis Club and they proposed that the club sponsor a foundation to be organized under the laws of Oklahoma as a religious, educational and charitable foundation on a tax exempt basis for the construction and operation of all types of community recreational education facilities. The Kiwanis Club quickly adopted the idea and by March of 1953 the Community Youth Foundation of Ardmore was duly incorporated and a charter issued by the Secretary of State.

A site was necessary. Many available locations were studied by the committee, architect and engineer. Finally, on entire block of land east of the high and junior high schools was chosen. The entire block with the large old Daube homestead, a community landmark, was donated to the foundation by Carol Daube Sutton and Leon and Olive Daube. A drive for $100,000 was started and immediately several large amounts were given in response to the appeal.

The board of trustees of the foundation was composed of Wilson Wallace, W.C. Wright, Joe W. Shinn, Lester Dennis, Tom Cardwell, Ward Merrick, Ernest Riesen, James E. Thompson, Vernon Moyers and M.A. Rocketts. With 60 per cent of the estimated cost in cash and another 24 per cent pledged, they decided to go ahead.

In October 1954 final plans and specifications were approved and a contract negotiated with the Burton-Miller Construction Company of Ardmore for construction, excluding all deck and bath house equipment that was not a part of the building. Orders were placed with Corrick for all deck, sanitation, cleaning, filters and underwater lighting equipment and accessories. Construction proceeded and by the middle of May 1955, the pool was ready for acceptance. It was opened to the public May 28, 1955. -taken from "The History of Carter County" book printed in 1957

I have been entering all those buried in the Confederate section of Rose Hill cemetery into a database of names for research purposes by anyone who has internet access when they are doing relative look-ups or genealogy research. In time as these names get picked up by the 'spiders' of the big search engines like google, yahoo, and the rest, this index of names will prove invaluable for those searching for a particular name and find them buried in Ardmore, Oklahoma. Once they are taken to the webpage they will even be able to look at a picture of the actual marker. As I been entering the names one by one, sometimes I run across something unusual such as the three names below. All 3 died within one day of each other, and are all buried side by side in Row 19 of the Confederate section. I would assume these were all residents of the Oklahoma Veterans Center at the time of their deaths.

Abraham V. Hulse Oct 6, 1844 - July 16, 1932 Click Here

Loduskey Morris Mar 20, 1847 - July 17, 1932 Click Here

John H. Murphy Dec 26, 1847 - July 18, 1932 Click Here

The following are links to the webpages I've been building with all the names. Still lack entering a few more rows before I have them all entered. Click Here - Click Here - Click Here - Click Here - Click Here

One more thing and we'll move on. On my OklahomaHistory.net website a person can use the PicoSearch feature and only search for a name in the Confederate section. By not searching my entire website, it will greatly narrow the search results. Just click on the PicoSearch box and change the drop down menu from "Search Our website" to "Search Grave Markers".

Speaking of the Ardmore Veterans Home, long time Ardmoreite Rick Wallace has a invaluable website dedicated just to the history of Ardmore's veteran home along with webpages of many of the residents who lived there starting as far back as its first beginnings in 1911. Rick's webpage is a wealth of information. Click Here

I was out on Highway 199 (old Highway 70 to many of us) last week and stopped in at the Comet Drive In and got an old fashion hamburger. It was cooked to perfection, meat on top, juicy through and through, and even had toasted buns! Click Here

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Laura Martin, Public Services Library Director of the Oklahoma History Research Center, announced June 10th that the new Cuadra Star Online Card Catalogue is now available online from home. She demonstrated all of the features that are available and told of the projects being placed online daily. This much desired and long awaited development will make it much more efficient to search the millions of records available at the Oklahoma History Center in Oklahoma City. In addition to the Library Card Catalogue, the holdings in the Archives and Indian Archives are being entered as are records from the Newspaper Archives and Maps and Photographic Collections. You will want to check the holdings often for that record you are seeking because new records are being added daily. To access this important database, enter the Oklahoma History Center website at www.okhistory.org then click on Research in the top bar. The portal into the online card catalogue is right under the Researching Oklahoma History logo in the center of the page. Click on New Online Catalogue then select whether you want to search holdings of the Archives, Library Catalogue or Newspaper Articles. " Click Here
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"Some may remember that I ran for Lt. Governor of the State of Oklahoma in 1978. Lt. Gov. George Nigh was leaving that office, one he held for so many years, and seeking the office of Governor. Bill Cornish told me if I would run he would pay for half the filing fee. So I did. Bill was a wonderful campaigner and we covered a great deal of the state. He, no doubt, was the reason we did as well as we did. He never gave up. Southern Oklahoma stood solidly behind me. Someone asked me, recently, why I didnít do better than I did. Well, to begin with, I announced rather lateÖ..some had announced immediately after it became apparent George Nigh was seeking the office of governor. Anyway it was good experience. .Our pharmacy association leadership was predominantly Democratic. The Democratic candidates were always invited to our meetings but they avoided asking the Republican hopefuls. Well when Republican Bellmon first ran for Governor though Don Morrison, also a Healdton pharmacist, and I were registered Democrats we worked very hard to help Bellmon get elected. My wife, Ouida, was one of the Bellmon Belles, and when he came to Healdton we helped set up a reception for him. Then when Bartlett, also a Republican, ran for Governor we were right there for him. Bellmon had appointed me to take a seat on the State Board of Pharmacy that was vacated by death. He also appointed Morene Morrison to a full term. I was appointed to a full term two years later by Governor Dewey Bartlett. My good friend, Senator Martin, was successful in getting me ratified by the Senate. Morene served as President of the Board and I also served as president before my five year term expired. So when I tossed my hat into the ring I was caught in a Wewoka Switch for sure. My pharmacy association friends didnít vote for me because I had worked to help elect two Republican governors. The Republicans didnít opt to help me because I was running on the Democratic ticket. Later on when, Spencer Bernard became Lt. Governor it was through his help that Gov. Nigh appointed me to the Professional Responsibility Tribunal, an arm of the Supreme Court, that disciplines errant attorneys. I served on that board for 5 years and became Vice Chief Master who is over the other non-lawyer members of the Tribunal. The Chief Master is over the Attorney members. Also I wanted to mention that all of us that were running for Lt. Governor had an uphill battle as Spencer Bernard had served 18 yrs. in the House and had just finished serving as Speaker Pro temípore. So he had a head start. When Bellmon, who became governor again after serving as a United States Senator, notified me, as my term ended in the Tribunal, that he was looking for my replacement. So I was persona non-grata with the Republicans. Even the Morrisons abandoned me. I overcame the problem with the pharmacists though and I was elected President of the Oklahoma Pharmaceutical Association and served in the 90-91 term. Would you believe I was also given the Bowl of Hygeia? This is the highest award for pharmacists as it is given to one person in each state each year. By the way we are the only family that has had 3 members to receive itÖ.as Mark and Biff are both recipients. I also have been told that we are the only family that has had 3 members to be President of the Association. Mark, Sandi and I have all been president. As for the Lt. Governor position, I just didnít handle it right. I went on a vacation to Hawaii for two weeks right in the hottest part of the campaign. So I missed that much time campaigning. However all of the passengers on the plane, coming home, said they would vote for me. Ha. Representative Bill Bradley said I got more votes than he did in his district. He also told me that he would notify me when he decided to step down from his many years in the house. I planned to run for his office. Guess what happened? Good friend, Bill Brewster, from Marietta, announced his intention to run, so that upset my plans. I finally got my desire to be elected to something, in government, by serving two terms on the Healdton City Council. I enjoyed that, but am slowing down in my old age. I still serve on the SODA, Area on Aging Advisory Council. The Board of the Healdton Senior Citizen Center, Chamber of Commerce Board, The Healdton Oil Museum Board. Lion Tamer at the Lions Club and I belong to the Silver Haired Alumni Association having served terms in their house and senate. We are supposed to act as advisors to the current House and Senate members. I also am the Commander of Post 203 of the American Legion." -Kenneth Eck, Healdton Retired Pharmacist
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"Hey Butch this was on Caddo down by the health food store that just moved from Main street, you holding out on me." -Doug Click Here
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"Hi Butch, We had a visitor on our back porch a couple of weeks ago. The heat didn't seem to bother him/her in its fur coat!" -Ken Click Here
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"Butch, if you are ever in Monahans, Texas, you should have a burger at the SuperBurger which is owned by Patricia Beckham of the Ardmore Beckams! The burgers are huge, great tasting and reasonably priced. The shakes/malts are fantastic as well. A great meal!! Also, thank you for the information on the Keener Family and Roy Barnes. We thoroughly enjoy the music and comedy of Roy. Roy is the nephew of Evelyn Beckham Morris, now living in Antioch, CA. Their music is among the best gospel bluegrass we've ever heard. The CD of "King's Highway" is terrific! Keep up the good work as we appreciate hearing about Ardmore all the way in California. Thank you again."
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"Butch, I don't know who wrote in from Fort Campbell, KY but he was having trouble with his tomatos and asked for help. I know a fellow that had similar problems and he applied powdered lime around the base of the plant and then watered it so that the lime would get to the roots. He says it worked great...kristakal might try that...it wouldn't cost much for a little lime. Be sure to get the food grade calcium hydroxide..... his clay soil may lack some calcium."
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"My best friend is Robert Denney's niece and I told her that I could find the article about the shooting in front of Mulkey hotel but I am not finding it anymore. I read it long time ago on your website but can't find it again." Click Here
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"You may have seen the End key on your keyboard, but have you ever used it? Have you strayed away from it because you don't really know what it does? The End key can actually do different things, depending on the program you're using it with. Its main use though is to help you get from the top of a page to the bottom quickly. For example, let's say you're browsing the Internet for some FAQs on a specific topic. You find a great Web site that will help you out, but your question is answered clear at the bottom of the page. Do you sit there and scroll all the way to the bottom? Well, you shouldn't! Instead, use the End key. Hit it once and you'll be whisked away to the bottom of any Web page, any document, any file, etc. Also, if you're working with some shorter text, the End key sometimes takes you the end of a line, which is also helpful and a much faster way of doing things. The End key is located in the little section of keys to the left of the numberpad on your keyboard. It's right under the Home key and right in between the Delete key and the Page Down key. It can be found on any PC keyboard and on some Macintosh extended keyboards. It really is a great use of a key, so go try it out!" -Jerry Brown JerryBrownOk@aol.com
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"Butch this coming weekend, July 21-22, will be Duncan's 20th, World's Largest Garage Sale ... and ... Marlow's, City Wide Garage Sale. Duncan will have booths in the Park as well as bargains at homes and businesses over town. Saturday night folks are invited to bring lawn chairs to the park and listen to the music of "Summer Breeze"."
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The Chisholm Trail Heritage Center in Duncan, Oklahoma hosted a special tour for decendants of Jesse Chisholm with about a dozen kinfolks of his attending. Click Here - Click Here
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I appreciate all of you who sent me happy birthday wishes this week. I am reminded of a 1984 song by Whisperin' Bill Anderson, "When Your Happy the Years Fall Away"

See everyone next week!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

July 13, 2006 Circulation over 5,000 Vol 10 Issue 494

In last week's T&T I mention Max Munzesheimer was the original owner of the oldest home still standing in Ardmore, the Sayre-Mann house on F street SW. I did some more digging and found the following on Max and his first entry into the newly formed town of Ardmore. Also I received an email from which shed even more light on this early day Ardmore pioneer. You will find that email in the Mailbag later on in the T&T.

The following article was taken from the 1982 'Indian Territory and Carter County Pioneers' book:

In the year recognized as Ardmore's birth date, 1887, or perhaps slightly before, Max Munzesheimer and Sam Daube, opened a mercantile sore in the spot to become downtown Ardmore. The Santa Fe railroad tracks were being laid, and the new store lay on the east side of those tracks (where now an old furniture warehouse store used to stand.) The Munzesheimer and Daube store was called the "Iron Store" because of the iron like sheets that covered the exterior. When the first passenger train came into the new stop designated as Ardmore in 1887, Max Westheimer was aboard. He had just ran out of funds, and had to disembark to look for work. He found a job with the "Iron Store", he being born in the same town in Germany (Hoffenheim) as Mr. Daube.

In 1888, Max Westheimer, in partnership with Frank Wymore, crossed the new tracks to the west and opened a mercantile store. The store was called the BLue Front and was located were the Daube's Department store used to stand, 107 East Main. In the early 1900s Frank Wymore sold his interest in the store to Dave Daube, a brother of Sam Daube of the "Iron Store". The store was then renamed Westheimer and Daube.

A few years later the "Iron Store" closed. Sam Daube, who had established another mercantile store in Bowie, Texas became a third partner in the the Westheimer and Daube store, and the Bowie store was consolidated with the Ardmore firm. This 3-way partnership later established another store in Anadarko. In 1915 the Westheimer and Daube store was destroyed by the Great Explosion, but was rebuilt in the same location. This store became the leading mercantile and later department store in Ardmore and Southern Oklahoma.

In the initial years of operation the store carried all types of merchandise- food, seed, hardware, etc. This was the function of a mercantile store. As the city grew, the store became more specialized into the clothing and linen lines. In 1935 due to a coronary condition, Max Westheimer had to step out of the firm. It then became "Daubes", and one of Ardmore's most recognized landmarks.

Long time Ardmoreite Jim Rozzell stops by my office every now and then and we talk about Ardmore history and things of long ago. Sometimes he even has an old photograph to share for the T&T. This week he really didnt have any photos to share, and all we really did was shoot the bull. I dont even remember now what we did talked about, but I distinctly remember one sentence Jim said. "....want to go eat a hamburger?" I guess Jim was in a buying mood, and I was in a eating mood, so he didn't have to ask me twice. lol

The hardest part was figuring out where to go eat that hamburger with so many choices in the immediate area. I remember receiving a number of emails the past few weeks saying I was missing out on a great burger at the Bowling Alley in Lone Grove. So when I mentioned that to Jim, he said let's go. I ate a burger there 7 or 8 years ago, so I was ready, and Jim was willing, so off we went.

It was 10 minutes after high noon, the place was packed, and there was only one empty booth over against the east wall. Boy, we grabbed that sitting place real quick and placed our orders. I ordered my usual, an old fashion hamburger with mustard. It seemed like a long wait, when in reality it wasnt, but let me tell you, it was worth every minute. This $2.09 cent burger was one of the best I've eaten in these parts. There was a big thick piece of meat, some really crisp lettuce, and the most delicious crisp red tomato, along with some pickles underneath that piece of meat pattie. Needless to say I was a happy camper. Now I want all of you to look at this pic I took that day at noon in Lone Grove, Oklahoma and tell me this ain't a looking burger! Click Here

The webpage I spoke about a month ago that allows you to make free long distance phone calls anywhere in the U.S. and Canada has been working fine. I had to return a call to a news journalist in Toronto, Canada a couple days ago, so I used the free service and it worked great. You just have to keep in mind that after about 30 or 40 minutes you might get cut off. But you can always call right back back. Click Here

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"S. Doti of OKC asked about "Dug's Grill". I think it must have been "Dug's Grill". See attached photo of Main Street, probably in the early 1960's. I hope this postcard image is clear enough to also see Woolworth, City Shoe Shop, and Montgomery Ward." -Mark Coe Click Here
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"Butch - I think the place "Dug's Place" was owned and operated by Dug Patillo. If it is the one I am thinking of, it was on the west end of the block that the Tivoli was in. You entered through a 45 degree door on the left. On the right was the City Shoe Shop. At least that is where Dug Patillo had his place in the 50's to 60's. He was a cousin." -Virgil Harris
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"Butch, First, let me say thank you for attending the service for my mother, Beverly Westheimer Wellnitz a couple of weeks ago. Second, I will try and explain some tidbits that I have investigated about the Munzesheimers. My great grandmother was Rose Munzesheimer, daughter of Max Munzesheimer, and wife of Simon Westheimer. Simon and Rose had 2 sons, one that died at birth, and my grandfather, Jerome Max Westheimer, Sr. It is my understanding that the Munzesheimers traveled from Marshall, Texas to Ardmore, where they met the Daubes that had set up shop at the Blue Front (or Red Front...the stories have been changed or memories aren't as clear). Max Munzesheimer left Ardmore to set up another dry goods store in Gainesville, Texas. Max Westheimer, Simon's brother, took over the store and the store became Westheimer and Daube. Simon came to Ardmore later after spending time trading in the Dutch Indies and operated Westheimer and Daube in Marietta. There was also a Westheimer and Daube in Bowie, Texas. When Max Westheimer died in 1938, the store in Ardmore became Daube's Department Store. Max Munzesheimer was buried in the Jewish part of the Fairlawn Cemetery in Gainesville. Simon, Rose, and the infant were also buried in a plot next to him. Rose died around 1929 and Simon died in 1941. It must be noted that there were around 12 family members in Texas, and I'm still trying to find out if Gustav Munzesheimer, from the Munzesheimer Manor in Mineola, Texas is related. Love your articles and work." -Chris O'Donnell
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The Wilson News Feb. 1915
"Would Create New County"
There has been an agitation started at Wilson and in other portions of the county, and in some portions of Jefferson, Stephens and Love Counties, to cut off enough territory from each of the counties named and form a new county with Ringling as the county seat. Just what the movement will amount to is not known at the present time, but the argument is advanced that with McCrory as Speaker of the House, he might wield the big stick with sufficient force to bring the change about and add another county to the list already claimed by the state. County Commissioner, Taliaferro, today stated that he had heard this talk principally at Wilson and while he was not disposed to take the matter seriously, still it might amount to something more than talk unless the people of this county were awakened to the fact that such a thing might be accomplished. Those who are interested in the scheme have gone so far as to suggest three names to be submitted for the county: Wilson, Williams (after the present governor), and Ringling.

Contributor's note: "The reason a new county was not formed - In order for a new county to be formed, it must contain a taxable area of 400 square miles. The "new" county could not fill that criteria without taking land from other counties who would have, then, not met their requirement of taxable area." -Melinda Taylor
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"I know you do most of hamburger research in Oklahoma, but if you haven't been to Gene's Hamburger Harbor in Gordonville, Tx. you are missing a good one. Gene's is on Hwy 377 about 2 miles south of the Willis bridge, 1/2 lb burgers comes with fries. They have a lunch special of 1/3# hamburger or cheeseburger fries and drink for $4.95. They are closed on Mondays." -Noel Stewart, Gordonville, Tx.
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"On Monday evening, July 17th, at 7 p.m., the Arbuckle Historical Society of Murray County in Sulphur is inviting everyone interested in stories about the Civilian Conservation Corps camp # 808 to meet with us at our Museum, 402 West Muskogee in Sulphur. We hope to have several of those who participated in this government program present their recollections of their work at Platt National Park. We do not charge admission, but of course, contributions are always appreciated! The museum will stay open after the program so any who wish may look at our two floors of historic artifacts! We always appreciate receipt of old photos (or good xerox copies) of life in Murray County! Be sure to identify any persons, locations, buildings, etc. shown. FYI: Since there are those who believe that Elvis Presley is still alive, our August 21st program will feature "ELVIS PRESLEY" and quite a number of artifacts. Keep up the good work with your very interesting documentary of the history of this area of Oklahoma!" ursm_17848@yahoo.com
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"A few weeks ago someone was searching for information for Addington. The Waurika and Ringling newspapers would have information on Addington. Also there is a Jefferson County elist that can be subscribed to by visiting the Rootsweb site. Click on email lists, then Oklahoma, then list of counties, Jefferson and subscribe." -Melinda Taylor
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"I am not sure if you can help me, but i am at my wits end. I have almost given up on tomato's this year. We live on Fort Campbell, KY and our ground is red clay. I prepared a nice sunny spot for my tomatos and water them regularly. The problem is the plants look great and are producing blooms, but the blooms turn brown and fall off. No tomato's! I have never had a problem in the past and am very frustrated this year. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated." kristakal@comcast.net
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"Butch, recently I looked at a webpage from OkGis and somehow I was automatically put on their email list. If anyone else is getting a lot of email from OKGIS for jobs and other things you can go to this website and remove your name." Click Here
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"Halito! That's "hello" in Choctaw. Butch, I wanted to thank you for some incredible information I got from T & T a couple of weeks ago. I'll start at the beginning. My great grandfather, a full blood Choctaw was injured in WW I, died in the hospital and was buried in France. My great grandmother had the option of having his body returned but chose not to, as others had received the wrong bodies. He was very young and the father of 4 small children. At that time Indians were not U.S. citizens but they fought for this country just like the rest of the young men did. Somehow, the information of his burial place was lost and no one in the family knew how to find that information. I had tried to find something on the internet about 6 years ago for my mother. She desperately wanted to visit the cemetery and have a proper Choctaw burial ceremony. Thanks to a letter sent in by one of your Readers that included a link to look up names of soldiers buried in France I was able to get the name of the cemetery and the exact plot. I printed out the information, took it to my mother, who cried. She and a cousin are now planning their trip to France. Yakoke! (thank you)."
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"Hi Butch. This weekend I took my daughter and granddaughter over to Petit Jean state park in Arkansas northwest of Little Rock. There is a fly-in campsite there next to a 5,800 foot runway on a mountain top. This was donated/dedicated by Lt. Governor Winthrop Rockafeller in 2002 and is a really nice place to land and camp. The park rangers gave us a ride over to the main park from the airstrip and we spent two days hiking up and down the canyons. It is an excellent place to visit if you want to see some beautiful scenery in a peaceful backdrop and don't mind hiking several miles. I also found a really great hamburger there. It is called the Mather Lodge burger and is served at the restaurant in the Mather Lodge. I highly recommend both a visit to the park and a Mather Lodge burger for lunch." Click Here
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"Hi Butch... I have a question... My Gr. Gr. Grandmother and Gr. Grandfather are buried at the Red River Cemetery outside of Gainesville (20 miles NW of Gainesville - 4 miles south of the Red River) in what used to be called Sivells Bend Community. The Grandmother's headstone is broken in to and the Grandfather's headstone from what I hear has been knocked over by cows...I hope to find someone in that area of TX who will help get my Grandfather's stone uprighted and the Grandmothers headstone fixed or replaced..do you have any idea who I might find in that area to help me achieve this mission? I am sending along a photo that I took several years ago when the Grandfathers stone was still standing upright..you can see on the left where the other stone is broken. My Uncle Donald Morgan is in the photo. Thank you for any help." -Karen Morgan Palmer in West Texas Jazloo@cs.com Click Here
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"Dear Mr. Bridges, Mark Lauderdale here. I have a story that is rather amusing, at least to me, regarding my experience with my request for an educated cheese burger. I had never really traveled much until I joined the Navy at the age of 19. My first flight on a "Jet" airplane was from Oklahoma City to San Diego, California via Los Angeles for boot camp. This was in August of 1973. You could say I had never been much beyond Dallas and OKC in those 19 years. While attending school to become a Navy Hospital Corpsman at Balboa Naval Hospital in San Diego I was in a long line of sailors in the chow hall. As the line inched its way up to the short order section a big burley cook in rolled up T-shirt sleeves and rolled down white hat (standard Navy issue type), I ask for an Educated Cheese Burger, fries and coke. Just as Mr. Brown and Chock had trained those of us who ate at the Hamburger Inn each day while at Ardmore High School. Well, we know how colorful a sailors vocabulary can be. I was told to give him my order or he would kick my "educated" (substitute a word for behind that rhymes with class here) out the door. Then I ask for "old fashion" which is common lingo for all the Sonic drive ins' and again was rewarded with a mouthful of slurs no mother would love to hear their son say. Scared and feeling two feet tall I ask for fries and coke and left as fast as I could. This started my "education" process in the ways of the world where I learned to keep my mouth shut and my ears open. Now I have traveled the world many times and received a good "education" that is taking me through a fantastic life. Best regards." -Mark Lauderdale AHS 72 mlauder9@bellsouth.net
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"Mr Butch---Did you ever have to drink water from a gourd-----I never will forget the first enamel dipper I ever saw---My dad traded for it and I just had to show it to one of the neighbors----I walked about I/4 mile to show them---That thing was snow white with a red ring right around the top.That was on of the greatest things that had happened in our parts until the REA threw a power pole off in the yard about 15 years later. I have saw you fellow raise those fast trees that grow over night---the tomatoes up side down. I grow gourds---All you have to do to grow dipper gourd is be able to climb a tree.---Working or fertilizing a gourd kills it so that is a perfect plant for me. Here are some of last years---- Those hung in the Magnolia I am wishing for an 8 to 10 ft handle--- What do you think the chances are?" -From Lookout Mt in Alabama floydcrowe@yahoo.com Click Here - Click Here - Click Here - Click Here
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"On July 30th we will dedicate the "W.T. Johnson Memorial Garden" at Salyer Lake Conference and Retreat Center near Binger, OK. Part of the Garden is a bell tower to house the bell that has been brought from the old Southwest Oklahoma District Nazarene Camp near Anadarko. It was there from the beginning of that campground in 1953. I have been able to find that the bell originally was in the belfry of the First Methodist Church in El Reno. The building was built in 1909 to 1910. No record exists when the bell was installed there, however, since inside the bell is cast the numbers 5 28 32, I believe it was installed some time after May 28, 1932. In 1948 the First Methodist Church of El Reno was purchased by the Church of the Nazarene of El Reno. Shortly after that purchase the corner belfry was removed from the church and the bell was stored in the basement of the church. In 1953 when the Nazarene District began the Anadarko Campground the bell was moved to that location. In 2000 with the sale of that property the bell was moved from the location near Anadarko to the Salyer Lake near Binger. Salyer Lake is located on Highway 152, 15 miles West of Minco or 9 miles East of Binger." -Paul Stroud, Manager of Salyer Lake Conference and Retreat Center
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"Always happy to see another site about Oklahoma! We have the best state! Keep up the good work. You may want to visit my site for information about Caddo, Oklahoma. I include a lot of genealogy info on my site." -Mary Maurer Click Here
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ďThe land is the only thing in the world worth working for, worth fighting for, worth dying for, because it's the only thing that lasts." -Gerald O'Hara, "Gone With The WindĒ

See everyone next week!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

July 6, 2006 Circulation over 5,000 Vol 10 Issue 493

This week I had a conversation with Steve Maxwell who used to live in the old Berryhill homeplace when he was a kid back in the 50s and 60s. It might be one of the oldest houses still standing in Ardmore. The last owner of the house, Mr. Truman Rouse, says it was built in 1888 or there about. Even though the Munzesheimer-Sayre-Mann house at 323 F SW is said to be built in 1887 and listed as the oldest home in Ardmore by the National Registry of Historic places, one must bear in mind that the Berryhill home was built around that same time or before but was not actually in Ardmore. The Berryhill home located at 618 6th SE was actually in the country during the beginnings of Ardmore and not in the city limits itself as the Munzesheimer-Sayre-Mann home. The Berryhill place on 6th SE was consider in the country back in 1888, can you believe that? Times have changed.

Anyway, Jenks Berryhill and his family were tinsmiths. When they first started in the tin business, they had their workshops behind the house on 6th SE. But they also would own a tin shop just a block south of Main Street on Mill Street SE. The building is still there and the name Berryhill can still be seen on it.

The reason I'm bringing this up about the Berryhills being tinsmiths, is the fact that inside their home at 618 6th SE is the tin borders throughout the two story house. I noticed the metal all over and around the ceilings when I was there in 1999. Of course you can see the Berryhill handiwork on the outside of the home too if you stand at the curb.

Here are pics of the Berryhill Tin Shop at #24 Mill Street SE. Click Here - Click Here

Below are some pictures I took of the Berryhill home on 6th SE back in 1999:

This is the front of the Berryhill house, north side. Click Here

South side of the house, with the metal roof and decor. Click Here

This is the old stairway in the house with a portal window. Click Here

And the interesting thing noticed, and that you dont see very often in this part of the country, is the Louisiana canebreak growing behind the Berryhill home in 1999. Click Here

Here is a pic I took of the Munzesheimer-Sayre-Mann home on F SW which was first located on East Main between D and E street where Max Munzesheimer, a shoemaker, and his family lived in the home. It was later moved to its present location on F Street SW. Click Here

Old photo of the Munzesheimer and Daube store on Main Street of Ardmore. Click Here

Pioneer Ardmoreite Max Munzenheimer died Christmas morning 1903. He is buried just a few feet from my great grandparents Howard and Ada Carmon in Fairlawn cemetery at Gainesville, TX. As an added note, ancestry.com reports that in 1920 there were only 3 places in the U.S. where a dozen or so Munzenheimers lived.... N.Y., TX and FL. As you will read in the obit below, Max died in Dallas and was buried in Gainesville, so maybe there were no Munzenheimers left in Ardmore in 1920??? Click Here

Roy Kendrick of Perry, Oklahoma sent in some scans of a 1928 Oklahoma state highway map. Its interesting to look at all the dirt roads and highways back then compared to now. Back in the early 60s I remember 3rd NE from North Washington to I Street NE (in front of Jess Hickman's laundry mat), always being concrete. But from I NE on east out 3rd was dirt.

"Some of the traffic regulations mentioned on the back said that speed limits for passenger vehicles outside of city limits was 35 MPH. Speed limits for trucks vary with the load. Vehicle on the right has the right of way. Spot lights are prohibited. Out of state commercial vehicles must have Oklahoma license immediately upon entering the state but non-resident other vehicles were allowed 60 days before being required to obtain a license from this state. Also, no vehicle or other object wider than 90 inches shall enter a highway except that traction engines may be 110 inches wide." -Roy

These maps are large files, so give them a minute to download. Click Here - Click Here - Click Here - Click Here - Click Here -

Missing Links Newsletter. Missing Links: A Magazine for Genealogists is a weekly e-zine, edited by Julia M. Case and published by Petunia Press, featuring articles about genealogical methods and sources worldwide as well as tales of genealogical research; information about new books and CDs; conferences, seminars, and workshops; reunions; websites; and anything (usually non-technical) that is likely to interest and/or affect at least a part of the genealogical community. Somebody's Links Newsletter is also distributed to those subscribed to this list. Individual back issues of Missing Links and Somebody's Links are available at Petunia Press, as is a fully searchable database containing all back issues of both. To subscribe, select go to http://www.petuniapress.com/ send "subscribe" in the subject line of a message to missinglinks-request@petuniapress.com

My Patio Tomato plant has made two tomatos. The one I ate this week was so tasty, one of the best I've had in a long time. Now to see if the other one ripens to perfection. Click Here

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Last week it was the skunk....Today it is a baby armadillo in our backyard. Do I just think I live in town????? "- Sylvia in Ardmore Click Here - Click Here - Click Here - Click Here
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"Hi. A day trip to Turner Falls. Enjoy." -Susie segseven@classicnet.net http://community.webshots.com/album/551870780RmVVxY
------------------------------------------------------------------------- Butch, upon your This and That advisement, we ordered 20 Paulownia Empress Trees from the email address you listed a couple of months back. We not only received the 20, but discovered we were given 4 extra trees upon arrival! What a deal! The trees arrived with the roots wrapped in cellophane, and each tree had several leaves. We planted all the trees in pots until they looked mature enough to survive outside the pot. Then we planted them in the ground here in West Texas, and we water, water, water. I wanted to share with you what our largest tree looks like after only a couple of months (probably a little over 3 ft tall) and a second photo of a close-up of a leaf. The leaves are so big and beautiful, velvety like, and look fantastic when the wind blows them. We have all the trees but 9 planted now. The others are straggling a little and are still in the pots, but they continue to grow. We love the trees. Thanx for the info.

Schahara
Ask Me About Music!
http://www.musicmessage.com
Ask Me About Internet Marketing
http://www.wisewize.com
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Butch, I wanted to share my photos from my recent trip to Flagstaff Arizona with you. Boy was there nothing between West Texas and Flagstaff... Enjoy. http://community.webshots.com/myphotos?action=viewAllPhotos&albumID=551758327&security=OZotEe -Jayson Pruitt Dallas, TX/Madill, Ok JHP@airmail.net
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"Butch, It is obvious that you have hidden some pictures because I cannot find them... However, would you direct me to where the splendid shots are from the top of the Carter County Courthouse? We have our 50th coming up in Oct and I want to tout (again) your site and these pictures. Click Here
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"Butch, From the field guide it would appear that the snake someone was wanting to know the name of is a Speckled king snake (Lampropeltis getulus holbrooki) if it is from around here. There are a couple of similar king snakes, but they are not generally in this area." -Joh Click Here
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That looks like a King Snake to me. About hamburgers: I must add my two cents worth I guess. I was recently in Canada on a tour and our tour guide took us to his favorite hamburger place in Toronto. It was on the east side, The Beaches area, at a place called LICKS. The burgers were wonderful! Flavorful and the meat was at least 1/2 inch thick. yumm! -N. C., in Shawnee
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"Hello Butch. After spending some time in the U.S. NAVY, coming home for a few months, my Father made a towing trailer, loaded it up and we headed for California. When my father was stationed in California he visited his brother who had moved out there in 1941 so it wasn't like we didn't have someplace to go. In 1957 I had joined the US Air force. I was finishing up with my training and tech school by the end of June I was just waiting on transfer orders. My parents were taking an Oklahoma/Kansas vacation and decided to take my finance and I would meet them at the big family reunion in Ponca City, Okla. Then in Stillwater on July 5th. my finance and I were joined together in marriage by a Justice of the Peace, Mr. O. C. Whipple. It was the first time that my now wife had ever been out of California. So I was not only born in Stillwater, I was married in Stillwater although I had not been there for a visit in three years. Mr. O.C.Whipple not only married my wife and I, he married my parents 25 years before." -Tom Galloway tjg2@comcast.net
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Propane business owner recalls rough beginnings. Sam Enderby was a young man with a good idea. The 88-year-old Gainesville resident and long-time Cooke County businessman remembers he had an plan for bringing the first propane-powered tractor to this part of Texas. In the 1930s tractors ran on gasoline. Enderby thought converting gas-powered tractor engines to propane power made sense. He got the idea from his mother's propane stove. His parents had just acquired the stove and Enderby's mother cooked Thanksgiving dinner for nearly 100 people on it. The whole family was impressed by the efficiency of propane. So when his father bought a brand new Farmall tractor, he wondered if he could make the tractor run more efficiently on liquid propane gas.

To read the rest of the story, go to http://www.gainesvilleregister.com/local/local_story_177205810.html
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Q. Butch, What does the U. C.V. stand for on the back of the markers in the cemetery?

A. United Confederate Volunteer
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Dec 29, 2005 T&T: "Mr. Bridges, When researching some more of my folks I came across one of the Law officers memorials about a cousin's husband. Louis Hervill who was killed along with a constable W Arthur Hood in Addington 28 Jan 1928. The 1920 census list Louis with wife Laura, two children and his father in law Jim Blalock, my great uncle. I not being that familiar with the area didn't find a Newspaper with any stories of the shooting or where there was a trial. Do you know what papers I should try. I have a photo of Louis and wife on their wedding day, but it is on a tape and converted to DVD and I have never taken a photo from a DVD to print. I would be glad to furnish that portion of the DVD to the Historical folks if they wish. I would also like to make contact with who ever gave the information to the Historical Society about him." -Taylor F Crowe floydcrowe@yahoo.com

And today a followup: Mr. Butch--- My old military buddy came by my booth Sunday--Said they were down at the car lot discussing where Murphree's valley ran.---The fellow Thompson who owns the business said he falls from that group of Murphree's---Said when they moved down into the valley the women didn't come ,but stayed in Murfreesboro. --These were men who had been to New Orleans with Jackson---They liked the area and stayed---built cabins and then went for the families.----He also said as far as he knew Murphrees valley was only considered to run from Oneonta to the Ellison Cross Roads. ---- The fellow said he had some historical documents he would bring to the car lot and show him----He will copy them for you. Now every one has an interest in the Heritage book ---- It is out of print--- Should we locate some I will forward the address ---- Do you have a means to take a movie shot off a DVD and make a good still photo of it?----- I would still like to send a good photo of Louis Hervill for the Law Officers Memorial. -Taylor Crowe in Alabama
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"Hi, thanks to the tip about Soda Pops in OKC, I intend to try it this weekend. I have been reading about the Hamburger Inn, but I also remember a hamburger place in Ardmore called Doug's Place. They had great burgers and fries. Who knows more about that place?" -S Doti, OKC
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"We were at a friends house July 4th and he has these two peacocks that just wandered to his house 2 years ago. The male was trying to strut his stuff right in front of us for his girl. It was a beautiful sight to see him." -Doug Click Here - Click Here - Click Here
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"Dear Mr, Bridges I try to clear a little bit the picture of the Burris family, so maybe is easy to recognize the persons on it, well I hope you and your family have a nice weekend, rest a little bit now that the street where you work are fixing it and have that for excuse and go fishing in Lake Murray, and probably they have in the cafeteria a nice hamburger, I think you catch a bigger fish in Texoma Lake." -Ernie Click Here
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"Town marshal" and "city marshal" were and are today the legal titles of the persons we call chiefs of police. This is true today in both Perry and Oklahoma--the formal title of the chiefs of police is "city marshal." Probably true in most places. From "The First Generation," by Fred Beers, Perry historian, former managing editor of the Perry Daily Journal and later director of corporate communications for the Charles Machine Works (Ditch Witch): "The first meeting of the city council was on October 28 [1893]....As one of his first acts, Mayor [John N.] Brogan appointed William Tilghman as town marshal (chief of police) and John Thornhill, George Starmer, "Fatty" Hopkins and H.A. (Heck) Thomas as policemen.

"Bill Tilghman...was among the most noted peace officers in the West and had already won a reputation as a law enforcer in Guthrie. Before coming to Oklahoma Territory he had teamed up with Bat Masterson to bring law and order to Dodge City, Kansas. With Masterson as sheriff and Tilghman his deputy that wild frontier town was partly tamed. The two may have provided the inspiration for television's fictional Marshal Dillon and his dramatic exploits. Tilghman was killed some thirty years later in Cromwell, Oklahoma, by a bullet fired by a drunken fellow officer." -Wes Leatherock wleathus@yahoo.com
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Here is a vintage advertising blotter from Woerz Bros' Florists in Ardmore, OK. Probably in the 1930's or '40's. Phone number was 995. Click Here
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"Ralph Gwin was my best friend when we were living in Miller, Mo. We spent many of our off days together. I have written lots of stories about him. This is the first one. Hope you enjoy it." -Kenneth

1966-67 Miller, Missouri

We haved moved into a farm house close to the pump station/pipeline terminal where I am working. This is located on old Hwy 66, near Mt. Vernon, Mo. The place is an old two story farm house with barns and chicken coops, and a big garden spot. A fellow I am working with Ralph Gwin, is renting the farmland to run cattle as he owns the farm just behind us. He and Pauline, his wife, become our real good friends. Lots of stories to tell about Miller, and Mt. Vernon, Mo. Where shall I start? Here is a one, I thought was funny.

I told Ralph our kids wanted to raise some chickens and it would give them something to do and would be a new experience for them. He said come over tonite and bring a flash light. I will give you some chickens. Well we went over to his house that nite and went out in the barn pasture area. A lot of his chickens were roosting in the trees. He got a gunny sack and I shined the flashlight. He started picking chickens off the limbs. He had gathered up 12 hens and then got us two roosters. Told me we needed to build some nests in the barn cause these hens were laying. I told him, my mother always said hens would quit laying when you moved them. He allowed he hadn't heard that before. Well we took the chickens home and put them in the barn. Setting them on the rafters and wherever we could get one to sit. Not the next day but the day after that, the kids gathered 13 eggs! I went to work and told Ralph about how many eggs we got out of 12 hens and he said I wonder which one of the ROOSTERS aint laying? They continued to lay 12 to 13 eggs everyday as long as we had them. We had eggs and little chicks running out our ears. These were not game chickens, but they did lay colored eggs. Most of them were the prettiest blue/green you ever saw. We had chicken for dinner every Sunday, and quite a few times during the week. And I still like fried chicken!
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Another one of our T&T Readers is writing a book. He's almost finished (for the 10th time) and you'll hear about it here as soon as I get word its available. The only hint I'll give for now is...... Gene Autry, Oklahoma.

"Writing a book is an adventure. To begin with, it is a toy and an amusement. Then it becomes a mistress, then it becomes a master, then it becomes a tyrant. The last phase is that just as you are about to be reconciled to your servitude, you kill the monster, and fling him to the public." -Sir Winston Churchill

See everyone next week!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

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