"This & That" News - October 2002 to November 2002

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Below is October 5, 2002 to November 30, 2002.

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Saturday November 30, 2002 T&T Weekly Vol 6 Issue 293

Thanksgiving afternoon I was going through Pauls Valley, Oklahoma and stop at the depot downtown. They have a locomotive and caboose on display to the north of the depot. Cabooses are now almost a thing of the past. Very seldom will you see one at the back end of a train going by. There is one thing missing in these photos, the train's bell. I guess it must have been removed by scavengers long ago, or hopefully it is on display somewhere in Pauls Valley. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/pvdepot2.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/pvdepot3.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/pvdepot4.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/pvdepot5.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/pvdepot6.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/pvdepot7.jpg

Many of the streets in downtown Pauls Valley still have the original red brick paving. In fact one street, Pine, is 5 or 6 blocks long, and all red bricks. They brick streets were laid in 1909. They have managed to keep the streets original when every other town in Oklahoma is either covering them up with modern day concrete and asphalt, or tearing them up all together. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/pvbricka.jpg

This is a close-up of a brick on Paul Street. It looks like Coffeville abbreviated? Maybe a brick expert out there can decipher the wording?? This brick was made in 1909. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/pvbrickb.jpg

This view is looking west from the depot down Paul Street which is all red bricks. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/pvdepot9.jpg

I have several more photos I took in Pauls Valley but I'll have to save them til next weekend. Ran out of time and space in this issue.

Ardmore lost an historian last week. I know he didn't consider himself an historian since he was a professional photographer, but to me he was an historian. All his life he took photos of southern Oklahoma, recording on Kodak film, people, places and things and now those photos are part of history. Some of you 200 plus T&T Readers who have my T&T History CD may have noticed there is a Folder named JoyceFranks on it. Some of the 20 photos in that Folder were collected by Joyce just as keepsakes. And others were actual photos he had taken over the years. Joyce came by to see me several times the past year and brought with him his brown manila envelope with photos he'd saved. We go through them one by one and have the best conversations two history buffs could have. He'd tell me little tidbits of info on a photo that only he alone could know. He'd pull out one photo, show it to me and say remember this one? Sometimes I did, and sometimes he'd have to tell the story behind the photo. Joyce would let me pick out the photos that interested me the most, and scan them. If all the photos Joyce had taken could be burned to a CD, it would be the most comprehensive piece of southern Oklahoma history imaginable. There are a lot of us going to miss you, but you'll live on in your photos. And if I could inscribe an epitaph at the bottom of Joyce Franks' tombstone, it would be just to words. "Everybody's Friend". If your out there somewhere looking down and reading this, and I believe you are, thanks Joyce for being everybody's friend. http://ardmoreite.com/stories/112602/loc_joyce_franks.shtml http://ardmoreite.com/stories/112602/obi_franks.shtml

A friend at the courthouse was at a garage sale last week and ran across this most usual bell. It is a combination bell, and salt and pepper shaker mounted under a rooster! The label on the back of the bell that reads, "Souvenir of Royal Gorge, Colo." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/bellrooster.jpg

I found another good site to download programs. They are shareware and freeware. http://www.filelibrary.com/

As in the past couple of years, I have about 50 wood toothpick holders available for purchase just in time for Christmas gifts. These have Christmas 2002, Ardmore, Oklahoma printed on them, so maybe they will be collector's items someday. Only $2 plus $2 postage while these 50 last. Check out the details..... http://www.oklahomahistory.net/tpholder.html

Our little history group is enjoying of the cheap long distance rates to make calls both inside the U.S. and overseas this month. We'll end November with over 12,000 minutes and over 1,100 calls. With the holidays coming up, you to can take advantage of WorldxChange's low rates! SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"The lady that inquired about the hanging in Ada in 1909- The name of the book is "Four Men Hanging". It is out of print and I have found 4 on the internet for sale- The cheapest one was $175.00. I didn't buy it. It was written by the small boy that is peeping through the boards in the picture taken of the 4 men in the barn. Go to Barnes and Noble or Amazon and click on rare and/or out of print books."
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"Butch, I have the book that I think this gentleman is looking for. The title is "Four Men Hanging: The End of the Old West," and was written by Welborn Hope. The publisher was Century Press, in Oklahoma City."
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"One of your readers asked about the hanging of four men in Ada in 1909. I have the book. The title is: Four Men Hanging: The End of the Old West by Welborn Hope copyright 1974 I will try to find out where it can be purchased. I watched the Capitol Dome Dedication several times on OETA. What a wonderful show for our state."
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"Several years ago the Amarillo (TX) paper did a long story about it, It seems we had two policemen who were descendents of the hanging one was related to one the hung men and one to one of the lynchers."
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"In your T&T of Nov. 22, the question was asked "where were you and what were you doing on Nov. 22, 1963, when you heard about the assassination of Pres. Kennedy? I remember vividly...I was taking a history test at Plainview High School (Ardmore, OK), in Mr. Darrel Kunkel's class. During the test, one of our teachers, Betty Hammer, came to the door and motioned for Mr. Kunkel. He went out into the hall and they talked in whispers for a few minutes. After everyone had finished the test, he made the announcement that Pres. Kennedy had been shot in Dallas and had not survived. I remember feeling numb and confused. When the bell rang for us to change classes, the halls were very quiet except for sobbing you could hear now and then from both students and teachers. I remember putting my head against my locker and crying. Of course, like most Americans, we stayed glued to the TV and radio at home and read everything we could find in print about the incident. It was a dark time in the history of our country...a time I hope we never again experience as a nation."
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"In the Daily Ardmoreite (Nov. 18), there was an article about how the severity of the winter weather can be predicted using the kernel of a persimmon. If you cut open the kernel (seed), there will be one of 3 shapes inside : a knife, a fork or a spoon - each mean different types of weather prediction. According to the article, if it is knife-shaped expect bitter, icy winds; fork-shaped - relatively mild winter with light powdery snow; and for the spoon-shape, lots of snow to shovel. This year, the inside of the kernel is spoon-shaped, so I guess (if the folklore is correct), we better get those snow shovels out. I personally would rather have lots of snow in the place of what we usually have...sleet and freezing rain."
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"This weeks issue mentioned Mr. and Mrs. O. R. Bridges. She taught second grade at Jefferson school for many years and was a great teacher. I was in her class and she asked my Mother about me every time they would run into each other for many years. I would visit with them when I was back in Ardmore. Mrs. Bridges bought special pencils with square erasers on them. When you did something really well she would give a pencil as a reward. I was always grateful for this wonderful teacher. She was one of many good teachers in Ardmore. George Hand was Supt and picked a great group of Ardmore Teachers. Keep up the good work, Butch."
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"Hi Butch: In answer to your question about November 22, 1963; I was working as Senior Film Editor at Channel 9, KWTV in Oklahoma City and was carrying that days movies into the projection room behind Master Control and noticed that a small crowd was gathering there watching the CBS Network monitors. I asked what was happening and someone answered that the President had been shot while in a motorcade in Dallas. I watched for a few minutes and then saw Walter Cronkite take his glasses off and announce that President Kennedy was dead, killed by an assassins bullet. I carried the films on into the projection room and hurried back to my office to call my mother to tell her the news, and then called my fianc? in Shawnee to tell her that I wouldn't be able to come pick her up from OBU (college) to transport her to her parents home for the holidays, that she should ride the bus into Oklahoma City and stay with some friends until I could get off work and pick her up. Then I inspected movies and other film shows; enough to use to fill time in case we lost the network feed while the station stayed on the air 24 hours a day as long as it took to cover the news of the assassination and upcoming funeral. Then I drove to my friends house in south Oklahoma City to get my fianc? and take her to her parents home in Minco (Grady County). I honestly don't remember much about what I did the rest of the weekend except stay close to the TV or radio just like everyone else." RoyKendrick@oklahomahistory.net
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"Hi Butch, I was in Ardmore last week and had breakfast at Ponder's Restaurant. Trish Ponder and I talked about when Joe Ben started his business on Lake Murray Drive many years ago. He still has the best food around. I worked for him in the mid 70's." -Nelda True, St. Louis, MO
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"Butch, I dont know where you came from originally but those are hedge apples not Horse apples. Horse apples are horse droppings. *roflol* Your friend in Missouri who has tons of horse apples." -Sue
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"This is Lighthouse Assembly of God baptism service probably at Lake Murray in the 50's. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/baptlighta.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/baptlightb.jpg

This is a hay baler that my father worked on also probably in the 50's or possibly the 40's. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/baler40.jpg

Left to right: Henry Guess, John Guess, Harve Guess and Bill Guess. You wrote about Bill Guess, the police officer in the early 30's. And Henry Guess was shot at the Blue Front Cafe in 1947 on Caddo Street in Ardmore. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/guesshenryjohnharvebill.jpg

This is a copy of Henry Guess Obit. You had an article on the shooting in an earlier T&T. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/guesshenryobit.jpg

Bill Guess is written about in your Memorial to Officer Moorhead. Bill shot and killed the man who murdered Moorhead. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/guessbillobit.jpg

Just the obit of John Guess, the brother of the above. He was my Step-father. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/guessjohnobit.jpg

My mother told me she thought this was taken at the Rock Crusher where my father worked years ago at Mill Creek or Doughtery. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/blackburnco.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/crusherd.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/crusherd2.jpg

My mother is the lady in the hat. Her name was Elvie West(now Guess) and the other lady was Neta West Marsh(I believe). It was taken by someone on the street here in Ardmore. I just thought it was kinda interesting because it shows some signs such as Ardmore Hotel, etc. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/westmarsh.jpg

Just a picture of someone I don't recognize. The back had the name Lorn Gaines and it shows it was taken in Indian Territory. Just wondered if anyone knew of this person." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/lorngaines.jpg
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"I was sitting in Mr. Allen's Science class when the intercom announced Pres. Kennedy being shot. Then on my birthday, Nov. 25th I had a slumber party and it was very somber and all we could watch on tv was all the events that was going on. Still sad thinking about that day so many years ago."
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"The real reason i am writing is that while surfing i came across and interesting Ardmoreite that i never knew about....you may know of him ...i was reading from cablecenter.org and came across Larry Boggs from ardmore who was a cable pioneer i'll paste a little about him......Cable History Section."

Operator and Business: 1965 The NCTA creates a National Award in memory of Larry Boggs, a pioneer cable operator. Boggs started the Vumore Company in Ardmore, Oklahoma in 1950 and attracted the investment of Video Independent Theaters in 1952. The company also operated one of the early common carrier microwave services and was eventually bought by RKO General, becoming CableCom-General. The Larry Boggs Award is presented to the man whose leadership and foresight place the cable industry in the vanguard of new communications technology. The recipient of the first award is Bill Daniels, founder of Daniels and Associates."
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"Your paragraph about the Quaker oat dishes brought back some really fond memories. My sisters and I were always so excited when Mom brought home a new box of oats. We could hardly wait to see what was inside. A bowl, cup, or saucer - can't remember if there were any glasses - do you? Anyway, we thought they were all beautiful. I have a thing for pretty glassware to this day and collect tiny lead crystal and silver salt and pepper shakers. Usually find them in antique or second hand stores when my middle sister visits from Baton Rouge. She loves to shop for antiques and always drags me along."
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"Have you ever eaten boiled peanuts - probably not as they're an Alabama, Georgia and Florida delicacy! It's peanut harvest time here in S.W. Oklahoma so I got a bag of peanuts fresh from the field and boiled them in their shells. Takes about three or four hours of boiling in heavily salted water but well worth the wait. Like pinto beans with a peanuty taste - yum! Good hot or cold!"
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"Butch, I've just been readin some old This and That ref house apples. They do not smell as they get older at least mine don't and mice seem to love them at least this one did until my cat Bro caught him last night."
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"Re: Windmills, my father and I have been trying to find one that is in fairly decent shape for his farm in Madill. I hope someone out there knows of some around that they would be interested in letting go of. Thanks." JHP@airmail.net
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"Hey Butch, I still enjoy your newsletter so much, even though I'm not an 'Okie'. The Quaker Oatmeal goblets are so pretty. I have silver flatware with a pattern that is very similar. I think my mom bought it in the 1040's.

I do have a question some of your readers may be able to answer. We had some mugs that we always used for hot chocolate when I was a kid. They were a little taller than the big coffee mugs today. They were white on the inside, but the outside had a texture. The outside was also colored, pastels I think... I remember a blue one and a green one in particular. Anyone else recall those or know where I could locate some?"
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"I was in preschool on November 22, 1963. I remember all the moms were crying when they came to pick us up. We had been to DC that summer and visited the Whitehouse."
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"I'am looking for information on my great grandfather. I think he might have taught school in wilson or ringling oklahoma. His name was E.B. Mabra I thought you might remember him. thanks for any information." whisper@us.inter.net
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"This is pretty cool. Put your birth date in the window when you click on this link and see what happens.... http://www.frontiernet.net/~cdm/age1.html
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"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike 1809-1891. A crusader for justice for Native Americans and only Confederate soldier to be honored in America's capitol: Washington, DC. The Albert Pike Highway runs from Hot Springs, Arkansas to Muskogee to Tulsa, to Alva to Dodge City to Colorado Springs, Colorado.
http://www.owu.edu/~deschul/trails/national/albert.html
http://www.masonicinfo.com/pike.htm

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 2
Lone Grove, Oklahoma 73443

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Saturday November 23, 2002 T&T Weekly Vol 6 Issue 292

According to the earliest Ardmore records, in 1887 the Board of Trade in Ardmore was working for civic and community improvement under the leadership of Samuel Zuckerman. Soon after 1900 the Board of Trade was renamed the Ardmore Commercial Club and by 1909 had 232 members including livery stables, hackline operators and carriage works. Also five banks, 7 drug stores, 8 real estate and land companies, 4 florist, 3 furniture dealers, 14 grocers, 12 insurance agents, 7 lumber yards, 3 oil companies, 10 doctors, 3 railroads, and a long list of public officials including the Honorable Charles D. Carter, 3rd District Congressman. By 1916 the Ardmore Commercial Club was changed to the Ardmore Chamber of Commerce with an office in the Carter County Courthouse. http://www.ardmore.org/

Stromberg-Carlson, a division of General Dynamics was opened at the Ardmore Airpark in September 1964 and utilized 5 buildings at the airpark.

Turner Falls is named after Mazeppa Thomas Turner, a Scotsman who married an Indian wife and became a Chickasaw Indian citizen. They settled near Turner Falls in 1878. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/tfalls10ab.jpg

As the story goes, in 1887 Main Street was marked off by a man named Jim Staples, using a tongue plow to scratch a furrow into the prairie for a quarter of a mile west of the railroad tracks, thus the beginning of Ardmore, Oklahoma.

Lawrence A. "Sprek" Sprekelmeyer (1886-1966) started his printing business in the Von Weise Building at 230 West Main on May 15, 1923. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/sprek.jpg

A photo taken in 1952 of local oil man Waco Turner swinging a golf club. Waco Turner was the driving force in 1955 in moving Locomotive 1108 to the Hardy Murphy Coliseum. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/waco52a.jpg Waco Turner is in center holding his white hat. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/loco1108.jpg

This photo was taken about 1952 of Waco Turner sitting in a car. Other man is unknown. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/waco52b.jpg

This photo was taken in 1954 of Waco Turner's wife Opie at a gold tournament. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/opie54a.jpg

Another photo taken in 1954 of Waco Turner's wife Opie at a gold tournament. If anyone recognizes the golfers in the photo, let us know. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/opie54a.jpg

This photo was taken about 1954 of Opie Turner, on right, giving an award to an unidentified lady. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/opie54c.jpg

Here is a 1940/1941 school class photo taken at Dickson Schools. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/dickson40b.jpg

I received a request this week from Pamela Barbour in Cleburne, Texas. Her husband, Wayland, is needing a bone marrow transplant and is seeking his natural parents/family. He was born in 1954 in Holdenville, Oklahoma and at age 3 adopted by a family in Healdton, Oklahoma. The attorney's name who handled the adoption was Wolfe, and Cleo LaValley was the judge. Wayland's name at birth was Archie. If you know amy information that may help Wayland Barbour, he can be reached at 817-558-3973.

When I was a teen in the 60s a man who owned an egg farm right outside Sulphur gave me an egg weigher. I know it was made before 1963. It says: Oakes Mfg. Co., Inc. Tipton, IND. USA on the front of the metal weigher. The scale is Small, Medium, Large and Ex Large. Plus there is a DOZ and OZ measurement. I'm not sure exactly how those work. I guess an Large egg weighs between 2 to 2 1/4 ounces? Then the DOZ is???? http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/eggweigh.jpg

I hope some of you made it to OKC last Saturday night (Nov 16th) and saw the Dome Dedication. I watched it on TV and it was a moving experience. The $200,000 fireworks display was unbelievable. Sure made an Okie proud of this state!

Just to let everyone I am out of books. If you didn't get one, I hope to have another set of T&Ts in book form after the Christmas Holidays. The series will most likely be Mar Apr May Jun 1997. Thanks to everyone who helped make those first 100 books possible.

I received an email this week of a bell in Sobol, Oklahoma (Pushmataha county). You say you never heard of it? Well don't feel alone, neither had I. Sobol is 24 miles east of Antlers, Oklahoma on Highway 3 and then a little south. The bell was donated to the Sobol Baptist Church by a lady named Cora Smith. The plaque in the photo is in honor of Ruby Lawless who was Clerk at the church from its beginning until 1986. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/sobol.jpg

A Reader in Lone Grove has about eight goblets from around 1950 her mother got out of the round Quaker Oatmeal boxes. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/oatgob2.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/oatgob3.jpg

Last Thursday evening, November 21st, I went to one of the best Ducks Unlimited Banquets I've ever had the pleasure of attending. The annual event was held at the old Civic Auditorium here in Ardmore and everyone who made it down there had a wonderful time! I guess one of the best parts is seeing the smiles on the kids when each and everyone receives some kind of gift. The kids are called Green Wings and to start with each one received a Ducks Unlimited cap, and then drawings during the evening assures other gifts to each child attending. Of course the adults win a lot of great prizes too. At the very end, the last drawing, Ardmoreite Kent Tucker won the Benelli Shotgun. I know he must be smiling right now. I won a camouflage mouse pad, a Redneck Deer Huntin' Game CD, and camouflage suspenders. But the best part to me was the food. The owner of Budro's, Buddy Simon, catered the food, and those steaks were delicious! If you missed this DU Banquet, you missed some great fellowship inside that packed auditorium. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/bsteaks.jpg

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Found an add... big newspaper add, 4 pages including front and back.. Monday November 18, 1940... Williams-Eubank Grocer, Ardmore, Okla., Phone 41."
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"Hamburger In's hamburgers and what made them taste so good. I know they cooked onions on the grill and added them when anyone wanted. But what was the spread that they used on an "Educated Burger". From 1950 til the late fifties I had lunch there many times and always looked forward to their burgers and chili. My Dad John W. Koons worked in the tractor business selling and maintaining Ferguson tractors, and as a kid before school age, and then during the summers I would go with him out over the countryside to fix farmers & ranchers equipment. But the highlight of any day was lunch at the 'Hamburger Inn'. Went back recently and guess what the thrill was still there, but the taste is gone. Help! What was the magic ingredient?" -John J. Koons, Georgetown, Texas jkoons@texas.net
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"Butch, Tell them the name of the fault is the "New Madrid Fault" and I believe it is centered near Memphis, Tennessee. Being over here in Arkansas we get a few small rumbles from it now and then. I remember one last year that woke me up in the middle of the night. It was kind of like the ground was rolling in waves like the ocean waves. It was kinda neat, though. However, I don't think I'd like to be around when the "big one" hits!"
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"My sister Ann Rempel was kind enough to refer me to your website and later, to send me a hard copy of your Newsletter. I found your collections really heart-warming. I am grateful to both of you. I was in and out of Ardmore all my early life but spent three years there 1940-1943 when I was a teenager. I lived with my grandparents, Lucian and Harriet Jones in the 800 block of Carter Ave. SE, across from Mary Ringer's big house. I have wonderful memories of that time and took away great educational experiences when I graduated from Ardmore High School in 1943. I could talk about some of the wonderful teachers: Hamilton Green, Mr. Crockett, Mrs. Madden, Miss McPheeters, Miss Reece and many more. Every student should be so fortunate as to have such intelligent and caring teachers. Ardmore itself was a good place to be. I loved going to the Preview on Saturday midnight at the Tivoli Theater and having great food at Priddy's Restaurant.(Did anyone ever get the recipe for that salad dressing?) Those frozen malts and grapefruit slush served at a drugstore on Washington near the High School were unforgettable. I also made some great friends, and still maintain contact with a few of them. I left in 1943 for TSCW at Denton, returned briefly in 1945 to work at KVSO, then located in the Ardmore Hotel. I then moved to the Pacific Northwest. One does lose connections after nearly sixty years, but not memories. By the way, my grandparents didn't have a telephone, so when we had an emergency, I would be sent up the street to use the one at the home of a Mr. and Mrs. O.R. Bridges. I hope they were your relatives, as I don't think I every got a chance to thank them properly for their kindness." -Carolyn Frei
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"Butch, Just an FYI...The Hinckley family lived on Davis Street. I believe 2 houses west of Robinson street on the south side of the street."
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"Do you know about the small older Indian schools close to Ardmore? My sister has a photo of a one room school. My dad said it was an Indian school, and I am sure it was somewhere close to Ardmore. The children were sitting along the side of it and also there is a mule in the photo. Some children had ridden it to school. Guess that was one of the country school buses at that time. The photo was made about 1907, just guessing. Dad was born in 1900 and he looks about seven maybe. I was send some info about the Mary Niblack school and it was interesting to read. I had seen where there were a few people on roots that had been asking about it. Many thanks, anxious to read your paper."
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"Butch, I was told that you have a news letter that talks about old buildings & the such from Healdton. I would love to subscribe to it, if you let me know how much it costs, I will send it immediately. I am especially interested in the old Gee Hotel that was behind the new Library in Healdton. Also if anybody has any pictures of it I would love to get a copy of it. Thanks for any help you might give me. I would like to thank Wylene also for the heads up on your news letter. I have really met some great people since I started my Tree 6 years ago. I have also found some super cousins that I never knew I had. Some have even drove all the way from Maryland, Texas, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Arkansas, & Louisiana to visit with us, & they were all just great people to know. Well better go for now, once again thanks." -Bob Kunau
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"In response to the person who ask about the woman that was murdered some where around 1930 out by Springer or Gene Autry. The way I heard it was that she was killed in 1927. She might have been a descendant of Quanah Parker. And after her body was released to the family they took her body to a field about 2 miles north and a couple miles west of Springer and a big pile of brush and wood were hauled and her body was placed on top of it and set a fire. And for three days and nights they kept piling wood on the fire."
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"My mother had read a book quite a few years ago about the 4 men hanged in Ada in 1909, and is trying to locate the name of the book so she can purchase it (to keep in the family). One of the men hanged (Jesse West) is a family relative. I did some searching on the internet, but wasn't able to come up with anything. - Any help you could provide would be greatly appreciated! - Thanks again!"
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"Hi Butch. We had a meeting of some of the local Ham Operators at my house this evening. (you know as you were there). But we had an honored guest: Jonathan Lofton, Who has been working for the government in the State Department for several years as a communications officer. He is from the Healdton area and is now retired and moving back to Carter county. In the Pooleville area. He is a globe hopper, having spent service time in Australia at the U.S, Embassy in Canberra Au. He also did a hitch in Algeria. I was in radio contact regularly while he was in Australia, but the government would not let him transmit from Algeria, so we lost contact with him for over a year. Jon's Ham call letters in Australia were VK1KZ but in the U.S.A. it is KZ5Z. We are happy to have Jon back in the area funneling some of that big money back into the local economy." -Howard Robinson, WB5FAJ. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/jloftonb.jpg
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"I had the privilege recently of meeting the sole survivor of a "tight-formation" training accident occurring at 20,000 feet between two B-17 Flying Fortresses. It happened February 12, 1944, over Mill Creek, OK. One of the B-17s was separated into two sections just behind the waist-gunner station of the aircraft. The incident was reported on the Ardmore Army Air Field/Ardmore Air Force Base website when it was uploaded Veteran's Day, November 11, 2000. After learning of the tragic aerial collision, I attempted to make contact with the tail-gunner, the only on-board survivor of the crew of eleven. Uninjured, he parachuted from the separated tail-gunner compartment. Finding the man, if he had survived WWII, seemed impossible after 58 years without knowing his hometown, state, or correct name. The name was incorrect in the newspaper account and on the government accident report. But it happened! We spent a day together last week, visited the base and the place where it all happened to the 20-year old, that cold, clear, dreadful February afternoon.

The story is told on the webpage so I won't tell it here. It is an amazing, almost unbelievable happening that brings the same reaction from everyone who hears the account. The story is told in three segments beginning with an email contact by a retired Navy Captain who was an 8-year-old boy in Mill Creek that day. To read his account, scroll down to the third "recollection" article under "This I Remember..." http://www.brightok.net/~gsimmons/remember.html. There are links from there to the other two pages. The account of how it all came together is found at "A Small-World, God-Directed, Get-Together" http://www.brightok.net/~gsimmons/strangers.html. The story of that unforgettable day is told by the man who is the only one who can tell it---Cpl. Joseph (Jack) William McClanahan. It is found at "A Story of Survival" http://www.brightok.net/~gsimmons/jackmclan.html. For those interested in the history of the Ardmore base during two activation periods, go to http://www.brightok.net/~gsimmons.

The purpose of the website is to remember those killed in "on-duty" accidents while there. Their names are listed at "In Memory Of" http://www.brightok.net/~gsimmons/memorial2.htm. The monument honoring them will soon be erected in the Remembrance Memorial Park just inside the Ardmore Airpark entrance. It will be officially dedicated Memorial Day, 2003. Thanks to the generous giving of the readers of "This and That," and others, these men will not be forgotten." -Gary D. Simmons

Attachments: Jack McClanahan at American Flyers' monument, 11-15-02. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/mclanahanpark.jpg Jack McClanahan and Artie Quinton (90), Mill Creek, OK, 11-15-02 http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/mclanquinton.jpg
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"Hello Butch! Would you or anyone have information about a plane crash at the airbase sometime from '59 through '62. it was a general aviation Piper i believe that crashed in the wooded area short of the field due to low fuel. several people killed. any help would be appreciated. thanks."
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"How might I find information on Thackerville Schools in the 1920 time frame? So far my searches have been futile. I have a picture from a newspaper of a 1930 Thackerville school reunion, although it has our grand parents there are other names and faces listed that some folks might like to have." -Evie Hadlock mailto:shadlock@brightok.net http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/thack30a.jpg
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"This is the URL for our website for Wilson's Historical Society and Museum. You might like to see it and sign in. It will get better as time goes along. Watch and See. Share this with your friends too." http://www.rootsweb.com/~okwhm/index.htm Ph # 580-668-2505 Open on Tuesday, Thursday, something's on Friday, and Saturday.
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"Where and What were you and your family doing on November 22, 1963? This Friday, November 22, 2002, will mark 39 years since President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in the streets of Dallas, Texas. Do you remember where, what you (or your parents) were doing back to that date? I was sitting in an Economics or Bookkeeping Class taught by Mr. Kendricks at Alva High School and I would have been about 15 years of age. I believe the World Series was also being televised and was interrupted shortly after the afternoon school session had begun. Shock... and not believing that anything like this could happen in the USA brought the citizens of this NW Oklahoma small, rural community to a stand-still while people were glued to their TVs ... wondering what, why this happened. How did it affect your community, family? What do you remember? Thanks for letting me jog your memories concerning November 22, 1963."
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We at the Carter County Annex Building had our Thanksgiving Dinner at noon Friday Nov 22nd. Boy, I mean those ladies from OSU, the Election Board, and the Commissioners office set a table fit for a king. We had Baked Ham, Brisket, green beans, salads, boston baked beans, pumpkin pie, pecan pie, and the list goes on and on. I ate until I thought I'd pop. But I think the best and most unusual treat was the Candied Pecans Michelle Bray brought. In fact, they were so good I wanted to share her recipe with everyone.

2 cup pecans
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup can milk
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp vanilla
1 tsp water
Cook all together in a sauce pan on medium heat. Stir very often. When the contents start sticking to the pecans and its hard to stir with a spoon, spread out on a sheet of wax paper and sprinkle with sugar. Let cool and break up into small pieces.

By the time I got around to taking a picture of these delectables, they were almost gone. yum yum. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/cpecans.jpg

I wish everyone a good Thanksgiving and we should all stop on that special day and give thanks for the good things we enjoy here in the land of the free, even in times like these when the threat of terrorist looms all around the world. May everyone give thanks in his or her own way.

"If I can in any way contribute to the diversion or improvement of the country in which I live, I shall leave it, when I am summoned out of it, with the secret satisfaction of thinking that I lived not in vain." -Joseph Addison, The Spectator, 1711

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 2
Lone Grove, Oklahoma 73443

Saturday November 16, 2002 T&T Weekly Vol 6 Issue 291

I was thinking this week how I used to wait what seemed like forever for a box to arrive by the U.S. Mail when I was a kid. A box that contained some kind of "free gift" from sending in several cereal box tops. Or sometimes we'd buy a box of cereal with the free gift already inside. One I remember was Quaker Oats. Back in the 60s they put beautiful glassware inside the box of oats. It might be a water glass, it might be a cereal bowl, it might be a dish. And you tried to collect at least one of each item they offered. I'm sure some of you remember sending off for those cereal gifts or getting them in the cereal boxes. http://www.theoldtimes.com/past/0102_1.html

Someone sent in an email last week about a possible balloon that "bombed" Boise City, Oklahoma back in WWII. Actually it was July 5, 1943 when a B-17 bomber accidently dropped 6 practice bombs on Boise City about midnight. This webpage tells all about the incident. http://www.ccccok.org/bombed.htm

There has been a lot of talk the past couple of weeks about horse apples. On my way to Gene Autry, Oklahoma last Monday I found at the south entrance of Gene Autry a horse apple tree! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/apples3.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/apples4.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/apples5.jpg

I was at the Ardmore Airpark Fire Department this past week looking at their new place of operations. The fire department is located in the south end of the building. I know those guys are proud of their new building. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/apfire2.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/apfire3.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/apfire4.jpg

I have put a notice on my T&T Webpage saying I am out of books. I only have a dozen left out of that box of 100, so if you still want one, let me know now. Thanks to everyone who bought a book(s) and made it all possible. Now to decide what the next "book project" will be. Guess I'll start working on Mar Apr May Jun 1997 T&T Newsletters for book form. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttnews.html

We had another milestone take place at the Carter County Commissioners office this week. Michelle Bray, one of two secretaries for the commissioners celebrated her 30th birthday. Secretary Phyllis Russell and some girls at the OSU Extension Office decorated the place all up Friday, and you should have saw the look on Michelle's face when she drove up! First she found a sign in front of her parking place. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/bray11a.jpg

Then on the entrance of the building they hung a banner with more balloons. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/bray11b.jpg

And then on the front door was a black wreath and more balloons. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/bray11c.jpg

As you entered her office area the girls had her desk really decked out with even more balloons and even the screensaver on her computer said "Over the Hill". http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/bray11e.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/bray11f.jpg

But I guess what really took the cake was the gag gifts she received. Like the old lady cane. It had a horn on it and it had a magnifying glass. It even had a squirt bottle of Old Man Repellent! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/bray11g.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/bray11h.jpg

But the best gag gift was her old lady glasses. When she put them on everyone just cracked up. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/bray11k.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/bray11m.jpg

But there was a serious part of the celebration too. Her dad sent her a beautiful flower arrangement. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/bray11n.jpg

And Phyllis baked some delicious cinnamon rolls and blueberry muffins!

Now I want to tell everyone, this has been pretty traumatic for Michelle, going from a young lady to an old woman, almost overnight. She sure could use some cheering up. Her actual 30th birthdate is Sunday November 17, so I hope a lot of you will send her an email at redcounty@hotmail.com and wish her a happy birthday! Oh, and I want everyone to know I didn't have anything to do with any of it. And that is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. hahahaha

My Webshots.com photos had nearly 500 hits the past 7 days. Each week I get a report from webshots.com telling me how many hits each album received. This week it was the Album containing July 21, 28, 4, 11, 2001 T&T Photos. That one album had 50 look-sees in one week. Sometimes I wonder just what photo(s) it is that draws people to certain albums. Oh the psyche of man is a complicated thing. http://community.webshots.com/user/oklahomahistory

Here is a pic of the Chickasaw Rod and Gun Club in Ardmore. I'm not sure where it was located. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/rod&gun2.jpg

Saturday morning November 23rd is Distribution Day for those of us who participate in the Share Program. Here's a sneak preview for the meat on regular share box. Farmland Maple River Sausage - 1 LB. Chicken Drums - 1.62 LBS. Sirloin Tips - 12 OZ. Tasty-Snack Braunschweiger - 11 OZ. Flame Broiled Meatballs - 1 LB. Jenni-O Tender Cured Turkey - 2 LBS. See It!!! 6 meats this time. Also for December's Bonus: "Home for the Holiday II" Meat and Cheese Box. Packaged for Gift Giving. 2 - 9 oz. Beef Summer Sausage 1 - 9 oz. Regular Summer Sausage 1 - 8 oz. Pepper Jack Cheese 1 - 8 oz. Medium Cheddar Cheese 1 - 8 oz. Colby Jack Cheese. For more info on how to participate in the Share Program just check out their website. http://www.heartlandshare.com

Here is a little unknown fact to Ardmoreites. John Warnock Hinckley Jr. was born in Ardmore, Oklahoma, on May 29, 1955. He was the youngest of the three children of John W. Hinckley Sr., called "Jack," a successful businessman who became chairman and president of the Vanderbilt Energy Corporation, and homemaker Jo Ann Moore Hinckley. John Hinckley attempted to assassinate President Ronald Reagan in 1981. http://www.crimelibrary.com/terrorists_spies/assassins/john_hinckley/3.htm

On Saturday November 16, 2002 an Oklahoma piece of history will finally, after 87 years, will be finished. The new dome for the State Capitol will be dedicated. Oklahomadome.com even has a webcam! http://www.oklahomadome.com/

If your looking for a place to pick up some dirt cheap CD games, utilites, and electronic gadgets, the link below is a place I've ordered from several times. Perfect and fast service. They have many items for five dollars or less, and there is it, no shipping. Keep in mind, you normally only get a CD at these prices, no fancy box or manuals. Example: Norton Utilities 2001 is only $4 total!. I ordered one many months ago and sure glad I did. http://www.clickcooldeals.com/

With November half gone, our little group saving money on long distance calls by using WorldxChange has already surpassed 6,000 minutes and 500 calls this month! There is no better time to starting making long distance calls for 4 cents a minute than during the upcoming holidays! http://www.worldxchange.com/agent/228072

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Butch, I enjoyed the film.I lived on 5th street in Ardmore in 1964 next door to Bobby and Melba, Doyles brother.Everyone in our area went to Washington Elem.to watch the fire.Thank you and Doyle Williams for the film." -Harrell Allen in Irving, Texas http://www.oklahomahistory.net/viaduct.html
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"Butch, I love getting your News every week. I finally made it back to Ardmore last June, after 30 or so years to visit my kin folk down there and in 4 days I had one of the best times of my life. I brought my 12 year old boy so he could see his and my "roots" I have missed for so long. I met cousins I didn't even know I had and some that did'nt remember me, but we had a blast. My mother was a Holley from Tater Hill east of Ardmore, who's family homesteaded there god knows when....... I got to revisit some of my favorite places, Turner Falls, Lake Murray, drove by my old kin folk homes in town and parked in the street and looked at the house's and remembered my childhood...... I would like to thank all my cousins that took use in and treated us like family they just saw last week..... Holley's....Joe Kenneth, Jerry, Margret, and my " little " cuz Bobby. We went crusin on Lake Murray and went to Tucker Tower and they have a display case there with a large photo of the workers that worked on the lake and I found my father in that photo ! I was amazed.. I had an Uncle who had a small grocery store with his brother, I believe, on maybe C street. Name was Earl Payne and I think his brother was Wayne. I also after 30+ years got to stop in Pauls Valley at Ballards Drive In and get a "Pizza Burger" that I been dreamin about forever..... Same guy, same burger....great. Once again, it was great to get back there after 30+ years and be treated the way I was by my long lost kin folk, and I hope to come back next summer. Thanks to the "Tater Hill" Holley's for the hospitality!" -Kirk Holley Smith, Hamilton, Montana khsmith@montana.com
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"Butch, you mentioned in your column today about the grapette pops. Have you been to "The Old Time Soda Pop Shop (I think it is called) across the street south from the Tivoli? They serve all kinds of old drinks as well as the grapette which you referred to. They serve sandwiches, soup, chili dogs, etc. and all the old time soda drinks. As a matter of fact, I had a Purple Cow in there the other day. Remember that. Grapette milkshake. Absolutely delicious. They are great people and very friendly. Also, one of your readers asked about an old teacher, Billie Zack Boles. I think that is Billie Zack Graybill and she is still alive and kicking here in Ardmore. She is the widow of Dr. Graybill. Really look forward to Saturday mornings and your column."
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"Hello Butch, As always T&T seems to capture the heart and soul of the home town experience, more specifically Ardmore. It's also very enjoyable to read the mail bag section and read the input of those who have grown up here, or have historical knowledge to share with the readers. I often intend to reply to something in almost every issue but unfortunately don't always get around to it. You mentioned, the movie, "Dillinger," and I remember that well I worked for the Postal Service as a letter carrier then and subbed on Leonard (Granny) Walkers, route he delivered the Court House and Down town area for many years. There are several things I remember during the filming of Dillinger. The scene, in which Ben Johnson, was getting his shoes shined in the Court House Lobby has a sign in the back ground. It is clearly visible, and the Words, Lake Murray are very prominent on this sign. In reality, Lake Murray had not been built during the time when John Dillinger was living. During the filming of Dillinger, one of the town drunks, got caught up in spirit of the Roaring 20's. A day or two later he attempted robbing one of the local banks, using his finger inside a coat pocket as a pistol. He was quickly arrested. Granny Walker who had carried the down town route for many years was, extremely irate when he had heard they arrested this poor soul, claiming the wanna be bank robber had a case of Jake leg so bad he could hardly walk, and was actually quite harmless. It was also while subbing on Granny's route that I delivered mail to the Squeeze Inn cafe. It was still in operation in the early 70's. Does anyone remember in 1971, the incident in which someone was bitten by a dog? the dog tested positive for rabies. When they told this person he would have to take a series of rabies shots, he ran off and no one could find him. This happened about the time I began my career with the U.S. Postal Service in 1971."
------------------------------------------------------------------------ "Anyone interested in windmills? someone posted this on Rootsweb: windmills. In Shattuck, OK, there is a windmill museum. Has many set up, and it is very interesting. I had known about windmills all my life, in Kansas, but they have some different and unusual ones. Going on a trip and interested stop and see them." http://www.shattuckwindmillmuseum.org/
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"Butch: We do not have horse apples in California. But on one of my trips back to Oklahoma, I picked some and brought them home with me, and took some pictures of them on the trees. However, we do not have lightning bugs here either, and I think the people in California are missing something of interest."
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"Hi Butch. I really enjoy T&T. Regarding Grapette pop, I was able to buy plenty at the Gene Autry museum cafe in Gene Autry recently. Regarding Bois-d'arc trees, in 1987 I bought a house in Oak Cliff, TX, that was built in 1923. It has a pier and beam foundation and when I crawled under the house I saw that it was held up by Bois-d'arc stumps about five inches in diameter. Only the ones down the center beam had little concrete pads under them, the others were right on the ground. I sold the house in 1998 and all the doors were still fairly well balanced. Amazing trees."
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"About the Osage Apples: I once fixed some when I lived in Arkansas. They are very hard & I used a saw to slice them fairly thin. I cooked them in the oven on a low heat for several hours & the odor was not pleasant either. I later threw the old pans away (think I used aluminum pie tins). Fixing these apples is a lot of trouble & messy, but I made some beautiful flowers with mine. I added floral stems to them & kept them for several years. I would like to do it again if I had the apples but I do not see them around TorC, NM. Thanks so much for your wonderful newsletter every week. I was born in Ok. but grew up in Arkansas. I still have relatives living in Ok." -Evelyn J. Pyles ejp@zianet.com
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"Butch you can put horse apples in bowls under you cabinets in your kitchen and you won't have a single cockroach. And they last for a long time before they wilt and when they do they don't smell either."
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"EAT HEDGE APPLES AND STAY HEALTHY..... I have been eating hedge apples, or Bois d Arc for about 25 years. When I have a stomach virus, bacterial infection, or food poison I take a chunk of the apple about 2 inches in diameter and 1/2 inch thick from my freezer and place it in a blender along with apple juice or sprite or anything to liquify the apple. It has never failed me to be feeling great in less than an hour. The apple has a natural antibiotic (tetraphydroxystylbean) in it. It is also a natural fungicide and are a very strong antioxident. I could type for days about this amazing tree. (DON'T TRY THIS UNTIL THE APPLES HAVE FALLEN ON THE GROUND) in October or after."
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"Butch, in Issue 289 you commented on horse apples. Also known as Osage oranges, the botanical name is Maclura pomifera. The wood is very hard and was used to make bows for archery - hence the French name bois d' arc (pronounced BO-dark). The fruits when split open are said to repel roaches. This is yet another native plant that the pharmaceutical companies should be investigating for special properties, but probably won't because they likely couldn't patent their findings."
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"Hi Butch, I found your page on the old stores and I don't know how long its been on and you may already have these stores by now. There was Williams & Woods Grocery at 419 East Main. It was there in 1947. And another was a article in the Ardmoreite July 25, 1975 showing a pic of the first motel in 1926 and it also shows Paul McLain's Grocery, Paul was Bob's great uncle, it was on the old route of US Highway 70 east of Ardmore."
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"I have heard of the "Oklahoma Sunshine" bottles. In fact, I used to have several of them sometime during the 70's. My dad used to go to conventions and would receive them in his "goodie bag". I remember some little piece of paper inside, but couldn't tell you what was on it. I doubt they are still around since I'm not much of a pack rat."
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"The San Adreas Fault in California gets all the attention, but back in the 1800s, there was a "biggie" quake along the Mississippi River that started the rivers flowing North instead of South, especially in the Ozark region of Missouri. Experts predict another 8.0 plus earthquake in the area within 20 years or so. Heck! I forgot the name of the fault line (age, you know), but its existence is probably why KS recently had a quake that followed one in OK." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/quake1811.jpg
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"I'm wondering if you know of, or aware of a tale of a woman who was supposedly murdered near Springer or Gene Autry, in or around the turn of the century -- possibly as late as the 1930's? The murder, if indeed it took place, was not solved, and has added to a legend of a female ghost who pushes vehicles back up an incline. I know this is a strange question, but I'm hoping that you know something about the tale, and whether or not it is true."
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"Really enjoyed your latest T&T - brought back a lot of memories when I read about the old skating rink at Cedarville. The Prater's (mother's side of the family - her older brother Douglas), and the Bridges spent a lot of time in and around Cedarville. Ma and Pa Bridges (our Grandparents) used to run the little curio store just south of the skating rink, Mother and Dad lived in one of the cabins just across the road. The Praters (Hamm's) owned most of the cabins just to the northwest of the curio shop and skating rink. Used to life-guard at Cedarville and Turner Falls as Mom's sister Dovie and her husband Bill Williams used to run the bathhouses at one time or another in both at both locations. See we are connected to that area as well. The small cabins just across from the Methodist Camp were eventually owned by the Geiss family whose son "Waldo" used to run a horse-back ride concession up into the Arbuckle Mountains - rode trail for him a few times as well. Thanks for bringing back a lot of good memories from my childhood - keep up the good work."
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"Someone e-mailed you concerning horny toads several weeks ago. I was at the Arts and Crafts Show last weekend in Ardmore and saw a booth that specialized in jewelry dealing with horny toads and I got a website that sounded interesting. For those interested in jewelry, "facts", and "legends" about horny toads, you might find http://www.hornytoadsonline.com interesting."
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"This issue of T&T was Sat. Nov. 9th, my 80th birthday. I have a lot of memories of Ardmore and a little town named Dougherty. Some day I hope to share some stories. Thanks for having me on your mailing list. I enjoy the letters very much."
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"I remember Billie Zack Boles Graybill well. She was my Accordion teacher and a wonderful family friend. She was a fishing "buddy" of my Mothers, as was Mr. and Mrs. Bartgis. Does anyone remember the Bartgis grocery store on 12th, at least I think that was the street name. They had a son named Dee Bartgis, I remember his name because he was my age."
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"Hi Butch, I had never heard of the balloon bombs of WWII. Living in a city that has annual balloon races and having a father that served in the war, it caught my attention. There were 6 casualties on US soil from one of the balloons, a preacher's wife and 5 school children. I found some interesting photos and articles." USAF article http://www.wpafb.af.mil/museum/history/wwii/jbb.htm pic of an actual basket in Canadian museum http://collections.ic.gc.ca/balloons/basket.htm photos http://motlc.wiesenthal.org/albums/palbum/p00/a0044p5.html
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"Hey, Did you know, Walmart carries (sells) grapette soda? I buy it there quite often."
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"I need some help, I have been trying to do my Jones line genealogy and I would like to know if anyone remembers my dad, Jeff Jones, or any of his family members. I know he was born in Tipton, Ok. 26 Dec. 1917. His mother was shot and killed Aug. 15, 1924 in Tipton, she is also buried somewhere there. Then it seems that all the Jones line ended with my Grandpa Jones. His name was Grover Cleveland Jones, June 16, 1892, then seemingly he change his name to Carl Grover Jones, that is the way he is buried. I do know that Grover came from Tex. and he was married to Gracie Blackwell, (born Nov. 22, 1896) my Grandma, the one killed. I have a picture of a Mae Jones and Wayne Jones along with Don Allen Jones. Grover's sister was Bessie Cleo Jones Morman, she lived in Burkburnet, Tx. I had two cousins, there names, Austin Jones, and Margaret Schulzt. This is all I know of my father's side. Anyone knowing anything about that side of my family, please let me know, and I thank you. And thank you very much, Mr. Bridges." -Vera Jones kamieljones@webtv.net
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"Butch: I remember Roland Deskins who was the director at the Ardmore Chamber of Commerce. Roland came in my Drug Store one day and purchased several dozen round and tall prescription bottles from that he said would contain a message concerning the sunshine on the sunny side of the Arbuckles. It was an advertising gimmick and yes they were to be dropped from an airplane. He explained that the shape of the bottle was to simulate the old water tower at Ardmore which is still standing on north Commerce (HW 77) the date was in the 50's. I don't have any details."
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"Hey Butch, I was reading your book and came across the Whet and Wet thing, and noticed something I had not when it first came out: Kinda Cute: to Quote: "Butch because you mentioned the spell checker , I thought I'd be smarty and tell you the word that intices you is whet not wet . Sorry I just had to do it." Here is what caught my attention, the word, if you use your spell checker, is not intice it is entice. If you look it up in Webster's you will find intice listed as Obs. So he/she that wrote you failed to use their spell checker. Sorry, I just had to do it." ------------------------------------------------------------------------
"This bell pic is of the old school bell from Scott, Arkansas, where my dad and his siblings went to school when they were kids (30's & 40's). I did some research and found where there's supposed to be an old church bell over in Stilwell, Oklahoma (Adair county)." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/scottar.jpg
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"I have a list of folks I know......all written in a book,
and every now and then......I go and take a look.
That is when I realize these names......they are a part,
not of the book they're written in......but taken from the heart.
For each name stands for someone......who has crossed my path sometime,
and in that meeting they have become......the reason and the rhyme.
Although it sounds fantastic......for me to make this claim,
I really am composed......of each remembered name.
Although you're not aware......of any special link,
just knowing you, has shaped my life......more than you could think.
So please don't think my greeting......as just a mere routine,
your name was not......forgotten in between.
For when I send a greeting......that is addressed to you,
it is because you're on the list......of folks I'm indebted to.
So whether I have known you......for many days or few,
in some ways you have a part......in shaping things I do.
I am but a total......of many folks I've met,
you are a friend I would prefer......never to forget.
Thank you for being my friend!!"
-Author unknown

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 2
Lone Grove, Oklahoma 73443

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Saturday November 9, 2002 T&T Weekly Vol 6 Issue 290

The other day I received a phone call from a lady in Florida inquiring about Peerless Oil and Refining Company of Ardmore, Oklahoma. It was incorporated in 1917 by two Ardmoreites named Arthur C. Wood and I.M Putnam and a third man from Poteau, Oklahoma by the name of Elmer S. Wood. This lady's mother is in a nursing home in Florida and her mother owns a stock certificate issued to her father in Illinois in 1919 for 500 shares of Peerless Oil. This lady and her husband came to Ardmore and stayed a couple of days trying to find out if this stock certificate is of any value without any success. The Ardmore company was in business from 1917 to 1925 when it was suspended by the Oklahoma Tax Commission from doing business. That's all that was known. I told the lady in Florida I had never heard of Peerless Oil and Refining of Ardmore, but I would do some checking around. This lady who called me in FL does not have a computer.

I didn't know where to started so I sat down at my computer and went to the internet. I posted one message regarding this company and the stock certificate issued in 1919 at a website of 270 experts from every field that specializes is searches. Within 20 minutes of posting my request for help, I had two replies. Here is the first of two messages I received:

"From http://www.e-analytics.com/stocks/oldstock.htm the first thing to do is contact the Secretary of State for the state the shares were issued in. The State Corporation Commission (or equivalent) for the issuing state may also be able to provide some information if the company is still in business. If the Secretary of State can't help, contact the "transfer agent," who will be listed on the stock certificate. If the transfer agent is still in business and actively representing the company or its successor, they will be able to provide the information required in order to value the stock and to adjust the quantity of stock (in necessary do to splits, mergers, etc.). Keep in mind that transfer agents are not always in business several years later. A company which provides the service you are looking for, for a fee, is R. M. Smythe in New York specializes in researching, auctioning, buying, and selling historic paper, and will find out if your stock has any value. The fee is $75 per issue. Their address is 26 Broadway, Suite 271, New York, NY, 10004-1701; their web site is located at http://www.rm-smythe.com and their phone number is 800-622-1880."

Here is the second message that came in just minutes after the first:

"Old Company Research" in Virginia could help you find this out. For a $39.95 fee, they can determine if the certificates have any value. Even if they have no investment value, they may be interested in buying the certificate as a collectible. If they do not find any information regarding the company being researched, you will not charged for their service or time. Their number is 1-888-STOCKS6 or dial direct to 703-579-4209." http://www.oldcompanyresearch.com/

I called the lady in FL and gave her the above info. She is going to call the companies and see what they can find out for her. I am still amazed sometimes at the info at our fingertips through the internet. The world's largest library.

A Reader raised over in the northeast part of Ardmore on "G" street with me sent a photo of the Arkansas foliage changing colors for Fall. She lives in Fayetteville and this pic was taken about a week ago at the University of Arkansas by a friend of hers. The pic is 300k and takes a few minutes to download, but worth the wait. Breathtaking colors! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/arfoliage.jpg

A Reader was at the Sam's Store in Sherman and found Grapette pop, and the next thing I knew, here he was on my door step with this taste from the past. When he saw the Grapette soda pop at Sherman, he told his wife he just had to get it for me. Here's a pic of this Grapette that's making a comeback in the small bottles. The only problem is I hate to open them! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/grape11.jpg

A couple of weeks ago we talked about U.S. Deputy Marshal Selden Lindsey (1854-1939) who lived in Ardmore around 1910. I saw in The Daily Ardmoreite Friday where his daughter, Zoma Lindsey Barricklow, passed away this week. Zoma Barricklow was 101 years old. http://www.ardmoreite.com/stories/110802/obi_barricklow.shtml

On October 8, 2002 in Oilton, Oklahoma (25 miles east of Stillwater, Oklahoma) 75 year old Della Mae Parker was attacked by three pit bull dogs as she went for her daily walk. Her right foot was severely mauled by the pit bulls and she will never regain full use of her foot. I saw in The Daily Oklahoman Friday where a Fund has been setup to assist Ms. Parker. Donations can be sent to Spirit Bank of Oilton, PO Box 10, Oilton, OK 74051-0010. Phone 918-862-3294. http://www.ktul.com/news/stories/1102/62065.html http://www2.spiritbank.com/locations.html

My 100 books are going fast. I hope I got everyone's in the mail who paid for one, because you all were hitting me pretty fast there for a few days. If I've missed anyone, let me know. I hope this book idea helps those of you who have been printing out each issue on weekends and save money on paper and ink. This week some of you said I should put into book form March, April, May and June 1997 next. This is the first issues when I started my T&T. Let me know your thoughts on this, if there is enough interest, I'll start working on it. It will take me some time to get it ready to print. Just send me an email. Thanks to everyone who bought my first book. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttnews.html

My webshots.com Pages continue to get hit after hit now totaling over 25,000 look-sees. That means people love photos! I've brought them up-to-date and all my photos can be seen at: http://community.webshots.com/user/oklahomahistory

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"This doesn't really relate to Oklahoma much, but since earthquakes are rare, it got my attention when I read that an earthquake of 3.3 struck Atoka last week... ten days later, this morning, one hit around Hays, KS. I wonder if they are related/linked on a fault line somehow. The Hays one registered 3.5."
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"Did any of your readers ever hear about putting the horse apples around and down prairie dog holes to kill the prairie dogs. Also... I have heard that some people slice them up and bake them for decorations of some sort. Anyway.. that is what I heard up here in the northwest part of Oklahoma. I am curious what you Southern's do with all your horse apples."
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"Certainly! Put them wherever you have a problem with bugs, spiders, whatever and it keeps them away! So this displaced Okie has been told by folks here in Kentucky! -Larry
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"Dear Butch you asked for stories that we remember about halloween. Mine is one of the sweetest in memory, not scary at all. My sister-in-law and I on Halloween night about 1957 I believe took our children my son and her daughter to trick or treat in the neighborhood. Mike (my son) was just three years old and since he was so small and the trick or treat bag was hard for him to carry we gave him a small brown candy sack and I carried his larger one. We stopped at our first house and the lady leaned over to put candy in Mike's sack he turned and looked at me standing on the walk in front of the house and said "My mommie has a sack too!" He is now 48 years old and still looks out for MOMMIE. What sweet memories. Thanks for letting me share mine." -Pat
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"In response to the inquiry about the bodarc or horseapples. Someone once told me you could make some really neat spiral decorations out of them if you sliced them thin and dried them in the oven. Please dont try this. I got into such a mess. They are filled with a white sticky milk, and I never did get them dried. yuukkk! I remember the Squeeze Inn Cafe. It was a bustling place in 1950. I don't know the proprietor's names though. My husband worked for Means Produce across the street and ate breakfast there every morning before we married. I love that song by Mark Willis, "Don't laugh at me" It gives a message to all of us." -Nellie Fox Combe
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"Hi! Butch for years the only use I knew of for horse apples was to bowl with and if you cut slices and placed them where roaches roamed they would kill roaches. We have a horse apple tree about 200 ft. from our yard and to my amazement one day while sitting on the deck I noticed some white stuff falling from a big oak tree. There was a squirrel sitting on a limb eating the seeds out of the horse apple and letting the pulp fall. Since that time I have observed squirrels eating them several times."
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"A note on the "Horse Apple Tree" They are Bois-d-arc trees. My father used to cherish the tree itself for fence post. It was very hard wood and took a long time for the end that was in the ground to rot. The Horse Apple's themselves are, so I have heard, placed under the cabinet, couch, bed, etc. are a good roach and mouse deterant, although they tend to get rather smelly after a few month." -Jim Brown intopickin
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"Hi Butch, It's been some time since I wrote to "This and That, but every week there is something in it that lights up my memories. I do enjoy each and every issue, but I get frustrated when I read something that lights one of those memories and there is no name to let the readers know who wrote the article. I think it would improve T&T and have more meaning to readers to include the names of the writers. How about asking your readers what they think about including there names unless ask not to. I'll be back in Ardmore in a couple of weeks and I'll try and stop by for a short visit." Roy (Buddy) Garnand rgarnand@gvtc.com
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"One of my readers told me that it was a japanese balloon that bomb that part of the Oklahoma panhandle in Boise City. Check out my newsletter for http://okielegacy.org/journal/Vol3/OHTHV3-10.htm -- "According to Stephen, the japanese tried to instill fear into the hearts of North America during WWII by sending random Balloon Bombs across the ocean to create havoc and forest fires. Stephen sent me the following email with more information and had this to say about that, "While researching and mapping historical sites related to the Plains Indians I happened across your site and took notice of your request for information on the bombing of Boise City in WWII. The Japanese sent several balloon bombs across the Pacific on the jet stream in hopes of creating terror in the American public and thereby causing the weak-hearted Americans to give up their war efforts. Most of these bombs fell in the wilderness areas of the Pacific Northwest and went unnoticed by nearly everyone except the the military. However, some of the bombs came down all across the western states with some making it as far east as the Great Plains. I have seen maps of all known bombing sites and some of these were scattered through Oklahoma and Texas. If it was one of these "balloon bombs" that hit Boise City the answer "Why Boise City" is that it was just random bad luck as the Japanese had no way of aiming these devices at any targets other than the entire continent of North America and even this large target was hit by only a small percentage of the bombs that were launched. If it was not a random strike of a balloon bomb I would be very interested in knowing more about this event. If you care to respond with what information you have I will look into the matter further and let you know what I find out." - S. Nichols, cougarsightings@aol.com
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"You ask about Wirt Franklin Refinery. Ardmore really had one back in the 1930s. There was also Cameron Oil Refinery and Cameron Lake. I think later this lake had another name like Santa Fe or something else. The refineries have had several different names in the past. As young boys, several of us would go to the lake and camp out over night and fish and swim. There wasn't a Lake Murray back then. Maybe someone has an old Phone Book that would list the Refinery. If you don't have a book left, you can keep the check I'm sending for good luck and T&T."
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"Wouldn't the property records in the county clerk's office (Register of Deeds) show the refinery ownership? In the Cherokee Strip, where I grew up, they go back to the original Patent granted by the government in 1893. On some land in Texas I once had a small interest in they go back to a grant from the King of Spain (there was even a certificate by a translator that the original Spanish-language documents, dating back to before Texas became a country, had been translated into English correctly. The Spanish-language documents were in there, too, along with the translations."
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"Butch, I remember growing up in Healdton, at halloween time me and my brother and our best friends, Jacky and Bobby Mauldin would get suited up and go out trick or treating. We went all over town and be would get our grocery sacks full. We would start at dark and end about 9:30. We sure had a good time. We didn't have to worry about razor blades and rat poison."
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"Hi Butch, Thank you very much for all you do. Your T&T is a treat. I was raised in the Jones Oil Camp 1 mile east of Dillard and went to school in Wilson. I remember all my friends from Dillard, Rexroat and Wilson who are on my mind all the time. I remember all the huge machinery and old methods used in the oil fields there and memories are refreshed every week in your T&T. Again thank you and all the folks that write in. I now live just north of Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri and get to "go home to Oklahoma" every friday night. Best Wishes." -Jack Lake in Missouri
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"I have several family members buried in the Mannsville Cemetery. My family came in to Oklahoma in the late 1800's and some of the older Headstones of my family members are starting to get Biological Growth on them (it looks like moss). Anyway, if allowed to stay on there to long it seems to eat the lettering off. I have been searching for a way for a long time as to how to kill this stuff. I found a web site on cleaning and doing preservation work in old cemeteries. I sent in a query on cleaning Headstones and this is the response I got in return. I would encourage every one who knows of Headstones that are in this condition to do there part and help clean them. It is quite literally preserving History. Some of these old stones are very neat." -Karen Palmer http://www.gravestonestudies.org/faq.htm http://www.gravestonestudies.org/preservation.htm
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"With all your memories I thought this might give you some good things to remember. Your mom must have been a super lady. I bet I got a couple of her popcorn balls. I lived down on 3rd NE and Catherine Reed and I made the rounds all over that area. I also remember getting candy apples that were great too. We never worried about razors in the apples or poison in the candy...those were definitely the good ole days. Our modern conveniences will never make up for the safe feelings we had back then."
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"Does anyone remember Billie Zack Boles? She taught 5th grade at Washington School. One day someone did something they shouldn't and would not confess. So, she lined the whole class up and gave everyone a whack with her paddle. I still tease her about it. She is a wonderful lady and was an excellent teacher."
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"A bit of history for you. They are renovating the old Tidal School between Drumright and Shamrock, Oklahoma and putting a winery in it. Check out their site. I am so thrilled to see that old building restored! Notice the bell in top! I know, sentimental old fool I guess. LOL They are at Stroud right now until they get it up and going." http://tidalschool.com
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"I enjoy reading this newsletter you sent to me. Again, it is so awesome!!! Keep up the good work you are doing. One of these days, your dream will come true.... all 77 counties will be filled with bells. Doesn't our Oklahoma state tell you something?? Our Oklahoma people is the most wonderful people on this earth."
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"Butch, You probably know this since you use your camera so much, but thought I would share it with you just in case. Wonder how this film would work at Brown Springs? I think that is the name. It is really early this morning."
Ancestry Quick Tip
Infrared Film Captures Details
Ever checked out an old family cemetery, house site, or property and find nothing to see or photograph - no markers, foundations, indentations or indications of occupancy? If so, pictures taken with a camera loaded with infrared film will capture details not visible to the naked eye or that cannot be seen on photographs shot with regular film. Worn lettering on old tombstones, lost gravesites and buried building foundations will show up on infrared pictures due to decayed man-made organic compounds at the site. These materials, having rotted, alter the natural vegetative pattern and details of human occupation (although blurry) become visible on infrared pictures.

Alternatively, take pictures with regular film late in the afternoon when the sun is low and shadows are long. Collapsed gravesite and foundation locations will show up as square or rectangular areas of shadow. Look for right angles since nature doesn't generally like straight lines. Two things to note when taking either infrared or regular photographs. First, make sure to have a reference point, e.g. a fence post, a road sign or a natural outcropping included in any pictures taken, infrared or regular film, so that an area photographed can be easily located. Second, change perspective if you are shooting regular film. Standing on a hillock, the bed of a truck, or even a stepladder will allow shadow details to be more readily observable.
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"My halloween story is probably quite a bit different that most other people's stories. The kids in our church would get together every halloween night, and go door-to-door with the trick or treators, but we didn't ask for candy. We asked for canned food to make up food baskets for needy families for the coming Thanksgiving and Christmas. The people who came to the door would be shocked we weren't out for candy like the other kids, but most were very nice and would give us a can or too. Of course, we didn't mind if they slipped us a piece of candy as well! The most fun part was when we got to put the food baskets together and take them on Thanksgiving and Christmas to families." -Skip Joers
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"The mention of the car boot sale in your T&T this week is a very common practise over here, nearly every weekend there is alway's car boot sales on, up and down the country people selling off there bric a brac etc. They are sometimes held in field's, usually on pub car parks, just have to hope for good weather though not much fun in the rain, some people make a living out of it perhaps they are the modern version of a Rag & Bone man. hahah. We had an earthquake here in the North West last week. Reached a scale of 4.0 did some structural damage to older building's chimneys fell down, and walls etc but I didn't feel anything here it happened 3 days in a row but on a lower richter scale." -England
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"Butch, I do believe Horseapples come from the tree called Osage Orange. I read an article recently that the Hedge apples scattered around the foundation of your home would repel scorpions. Now wouldn't that be great. I wonder if one could extract the juice and make a spray. That idea might make a millionaire. :-) Here are a few links you might want to browse. http://www.hedgeapple.com/ http://www.osagebow.com/Osage_Orange_P.html
We also call the Osage Orange a "Hedge" tree.These are Hedge apples.Deer and squirrel eat on these.They get about 6 to 8 inches in diameter. Known also as hedge, hedge apple, bodark from the French bois d'arc/ http://www.osageorange.com/ making of bows, war clubs, etc." -Pat Cooper McGehee, Sulphur
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"When you mentioned Halloween stories, I have one I'll never forget. Living in rural Love county, we knew everyone in the community, so we really had to "dress-up" to fool anyone.(No store bought costumes in those days) My mom always dressed up also so my sister and me wouldn't be recognized and she'd park the car in a dark spot so people couldn't see it. Well, the time I remember most, Mom dressed as an old woman, with a nylon stocking pulled over her face which distorted all her features and even scared us. At one house, the people had no sense of humor and were not always glad to see trick or treaters, but they did open the door for us and Mom went in first while my sister and me stayed on the porch watching through the window. Back then a lot of people had beds in the front room as did these folks. Of course, they had no idea who Mom was other than some crazy person in their house. Mom got up on the bed and started jumping up and down and singing some crazy song. Needless to say the looks on their faces was PRICELESS!!! My sister and I didn't know whether to die from laughter or embarrassment. It's just one of those things I'll laugh about forever. Oh, and we had one lady that fixed popcorn balls every year as you said your mom did. I looked forward to those more than any other treat." -DDollar
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"Butch, those "little buildings" were referred to as "the castle." My parents ran a souvenir shop the summer of 1942 at the North bend of the highway 77, called the Bar-C Ranch, about half way to Cedarvale, where there was a restaurant and roller skating rink. I used to trek along Honey Creek, stopping at "the castle" to explore, as kids will do, and then take a dip in Blue Hole, which was on South of "the castle" toward Horseshoe Bend. I was young and that was long ago, so all I have is pleasant memories without details."
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"This is the URL for our website for Wilson's Historical Society and Museum. You might like to see it and sign in. It will get better as time goes along. Watch and See. Share this with your friends too."
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"It was a medicine bottle that was labeled Oklahoma Sunshine. It had several instructions on it and I can't remember them all but I know it said you should have some daily but it cautioned you about having too much and told several things that could happen to you if you had too much. Inside the bottle there was an article about the surrounding area of Ardmore. It told that they were given out/sold to people of the area wanting to advertise the wonderful area of Ardmore in 1955. It also stated that some were dropped from airplanes and that one was found overseas from floating in the ocean. Anyone heard of this?"
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"In reference to the story about The Milo Baptist Church Dedication, in will be held November 17, 2002 - 2:00 p.m., Please let the person know this information. Thank You." -Tammie Armstrong, Member of Milo Baptist Church
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"Mr. Bridges, I found your website searching for information on historic Oklahoma grocery stores. I am currently preparing an exhibit for the new Oklahoma Museum of History due to open in 2004. The exhibit will be a 1950's kitchen and one component of the story will be a flipbook with images and short text about grocery stores in Oklahoma in the 1950's. I'm not having much luck finding information. I have some names, but no information or photos. Is your information limited to the Ardmore area? I'm looking on information for Blakemore's Grocery in Enid as well as Rapp's Grocery; Escott's in Cushing and any others I can find. I have information on Lovera's in Krebs, the Meers Store in Meers and a couple of photos I pulled from your website, but that's about it. Any help would be sincerely appreciated." -Sherry Massey, Registrar Oklahoma Museum of History smassey@ok-history.mus.ok.us
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"I've got some pictures of Devil's Den that one of our young Cross Country/Track ladies took a week or so ago. Now, mind you this is Devil's Den near Winslow, Arkansas, not Tishomingo, Oklahoma. But Lilli took so beautiful pictures and I'd just like to share'em with you." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/ddenar1.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/ddenar2.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/ddenar3.jpg
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"Butch, some info on the refinery in Ardmore, the first refinery was called Cameron Refinery, then Wirt Franklin Refinery, Ben Franklin Refinery, Bell Oil Refining Company, Vickers Refinery, Total Petroleum Inc., do not know the dates it changed hands each time."
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"We were in Ardmore last Tuesday 10/29 to attend funeral of Geraldine Rawlins, age 91, Geraldine (York) Rawlins was my 5th grade teacher in 1933 at Washington School before she moved to Ardmore High School to teach music. I was in her music class again in 1939 (Graduation 1940). Geraldine choose me to sing bass in the Boys Quartet; which included Halcolm Crawford (second tenor), Charles Wilbanks, (first tenor): Bob Gardenhire (baritone). We were fortunate to sing with Gene Autry when the city of Berwyn changed name to Gene Autry. Our quartet enjoyed being together and singing for all our 1940 Class Reunions until the death of Charles Wilbanks, MD. who headed the Sulphur Hospital until his death. Bob Gardenhire still lives in Ardmore after his WWII duty. Crawford lives in Dallas and we still live in Oklahoma City. Thanks again." -Doyle Bridges, Oklahoma City
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"J B Ponder, had dogs that slept under the porch of his "old store" and he placed horse apples there to keep the fleas away. Jake Goode owned and cooked at the Squeeze Inn before, during and after WWII. His best dish, in some people's opinion, was beef stew. When a spoonful of chili was added, it was called Red Top."
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"Hello Butch, I just wanted to show you what the cars looked like when I lived at 533 Carter S.E. That's me on the right." -Lee Wages, Ft Worth, Texas http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/leewas2.jpg
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"About those horse apples... Daddy calls them "Bo-dark" apples and Mother says they keep bugs out of the house. She has them hidden in corners and around the porch at their lake house at Buncombe Creek. I was interested in them and did a little research last year. They are actually from the "Bois d'Ark" tree, which was used to make crossbows - good flexible wood I suppose. Some people also refer to them as "Osage Oranges". When we were kids, we used to bean each other with them when we played outside... OUCH! Once when we were camping out at Lake Murray, Daddy had (finally!) gotten the tent set up and sat down under a bo-dark tree to rest. The dang horse apples kept falling on him! So he kept moving his chair, but they kept coming. We finally saw a squirrel up in the tree THROWING them at Dad! I guess he didn't like us setting up housekeeping in his back yard. Speaking of squirrels, Daddy is a fanatic about keeping them out of his birdfeeder. He hates them! He has taken to shooting them from the house with one of his grandson's paintball guns! Hahahahaha!! (The "paint" is actually colored, non-toxic soap!) We know it doesn't hurt them, because they come back for more! Now he has bright orange and purple squirrels trying to pilfer his birdseed. Speaking of Buncombe Creek, there is actually a "Bois D'Ark Road" out there. Some of the most beautiful houses on that road - I've got my eye on one that just makes me cry, I want it so badly! Ha ha! About those "rods" - those things give me the creeps!! My husband saw a special about a cavern in South America where a lot of extreme-sport-enthusiasts like to rappell and hike. They had a video camera with them while they were climbing, and caught hundreds of the creepy things on the video tape! They move too fast for you to see with the naked eye, but on the video they are visible. Too scary for me!"
------------------------------------------------------------------------ "I've been reading the old This and Thats and July 18, 1998 you mentioned Cliff McIntosh. I remember him. He was a very nice guy. I worked at Memorial in 1968-69 and again in 1981." http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/mcintosh.jpg http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/mem1975.jpg
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"Butch, I saw in one of the T&T letters that someone had a problem getting the large size maps to print out on one page. The way that I do it is: Put it on a floppy disc and save it to my mpg photo file. You can then print the full size map on one page."
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"Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It's perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we've learned something from yesterday." -John Wayne

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 2
Lone Grove, Oklahoma 73443

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Saturday November 2, 2002 T&T Weekly Vol 6 Issue 289

In 1889 there was a group of people who entered the Oklahoma land run for unassigned lands by sneaking in before everyone else. This way they could stake their claim for 160 acres of land beforehand. This group of people soon came to be known as Sooners. Well, I can tell you after my announcement of the proposed $7 This and That book last week, that Sooners are still alive over 100 years later! A number of you went ahead and sent me your money for a book before the books came in, or I even asked for the money. I did get the 100 books this past week and I can see they will not last long. Over 60 is already reserved. If want a book, let me know. Here is a pic I took of the box of books as I opened it up. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/ttbooks2.jpg

The books are $7 each and if you want me to mail the book(s) to you, add $3 for postage.

If you want to buy a book right now using any major credit card, you can go to my oklahomahistory.net link below and click on the BUY NOW button secure PayPal Online account and do just that! If you have never used PayPal, just click in the middle of the screen where it says, "If you have never paid through PayPal CLICK HERE" and you can use your credit card. Just click the link below! http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttnews.html

This Halloween I had very few kids come by for trick or treats. Maybe 20 at the most. And it made me think back to around 1960 on 3rd NE when my mother would spend all day making popcorn balls to give away on Halloween night. I think the most she ever made was 200 popcorn balls, and some years those would all be given away and we started giving out penny candy of some kind. We had a gas stove and she'd shake that pan for what seemed like hours popping enough popcorn to make 150 to 200 popcorn balls. She grease her hands with butter and mix the popcorn with caramel so it would all stick together, then wrap each popcorn ball in wax paper. She placed them in big wash tubs to hold them all. It was hard work but my mother loved doing it for the kids. People just don't do that here anymore, for obvious reasons. I'm sure some of you have some stories to tell about Halloween and trick or treat night as a kid. I would imagine some parts of the country do it a little differently then other parts. Let me hear your Halloween stories.

Last week we talked about Turner Falls in the Arbuckle Mountains. But we also talked about the little buildings located on the grounds just downstream from the Falls and raised the question just what was these "little buildings". Several of you wrote back on this, and you will find it in the Mailbag below, but what I forgot last week was the photo I took of the "little buildings" at Turner Falls. Here is the photo I took a couple of weeks ago. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/tfalls10q.jpg

On August the 24, 2001 I talked about a strange streak of light I saw in the sky. Here is that paragraph again from last summer....

"As I looked through the viewfinder I saw, for a second or two, something gray flash in the background from the southwest to the northeast. It reminded me of a jet vapor trail, but this only lasted for a couple of seconds, then vanished. I took the instrument away, and look with my eyes, and couldn't find anything. I looked through the RangeFinder again, nothing, and continued switching back in forth to no avail. So, what did I see? Boy, you got me. But it was fast. Very fast. I already had a pic of the courthouse, so I tried to draw an example of the "flash" as I saw in the Bushnell Laser RangeFinder. Maybe someone out there has an idea what this could be? My example is whiter then what I saw in the sky behind the dome Tuesday at noon." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/domenew8.jpg

At that time I didn't know what I saw, but I knew I saw something in the north sky. But if you have been watching the national newscasts the past week, there is no doubt what I saw, it is called a "rod". This UFO is being report all over the world and there is many websites with this info in detail. This past week the national news reported a man in Albany, NY taking a photo of a rod. The FBI interviewed him twice, and even had him take a nearly 3 hour lie detector test. So until proven otherwise, I am going to assume I saw a rod in the skies over Ardmore in the summer of 2001. I wonder just what those things really are anyway? http://www.roswellrods.com/

Speaking of the unexplainable, maybe we should do a book on Brown Springs south of Thackerville, Oklahoma. I get the most hits on my Brown Springs webpage from people just looking to read that information. What do you think? Any comments on a Brown Springs book? http://www.oklahomahistory.net/brownspr.html

Here is an interesting email I received this week. I checked it out and it is bonified.

"I have an old leather suitcase belonging to Frank A. GANZ that has been stored in a Forest Service warehouse it Sitka, Alaska for several years. No one is really sure how we came in possession of it, however, we would like to see a living family member get it. Inside are several photos, letters, bank statements, and other documents. Frank appeared to be a fisherman and possibly miner and had addresses in Craig and Sitka, Alaska. Names mentioned are: From Jennings, Oklahoma, Charles and Esther GANZ, Mrs. Hanna Jane GANZ, Henry GANZ, LoRena I. KEENAN, John H. KEENAN; from Healdton, Oklahoma John H. and Ruth GANZ; from Gladewater, Texas, Charles E. and Lorena Keenan McCHESNEY and their son Ronald Max who was born June 20, 1935; from Buckeye, Arizona, Mary S. ROBERTS, among others. Dates range from 1916 to 1940. Please explain your family connection and show GANZ in the subject line." Terry Butler, Resource Specialist Tongass NF, Sitka Office 907-747-4280 tdbutler@fs.fed.us FAX 907-747-4344

I got a surprise email this week from Antlers, Oklahoma with 5 bells attached. Antlers is in Pushmataha county, everyone calls it Push for short, and Teresa Young is the Pushmataha County Assistant Coordinator for GenWeb at Antlers, Oklahoma. She took the bell pics for me. Push is one of the most beautiful parts of the state. I love to go through there on the way to Arkansas. Mountains and pine trees everywhere! Here are the bell pics Teresa sent.

Bell at Antlers Library http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/pushlib.jpg

Bell at St. James Episcopal Church in Antlers http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/pushepis.jpg http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/pushepis2.jpg

Bell at First United Methodist Church in Antlers http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/pushmeth.jpg

Bell at Saint Agnes Catholic Church in Antlers http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/pushcath.jpg

Bell at First Presbyterian Church in Antlers http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/pushpres.jpg

I remember back as a kid when we came across a horse apple tree, we thought we'd really found something but really didn't know what to do with them. I dont know of one thing horse apples are good for, do you? When I was out at King Lake Southeast of 3rd and P NE a while back, I happened across a horse apple tree with horse apples everywhere. Seems like someone told me when I was a kid that horse apples were not good for horses. Anyone know? http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/horsea2.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/horsea3.jpg

I know our refinery here in Ardmore had several owners over the years. Does anyone know if they were every owned by Wirt Franklin Oil? This would have been back in the 30s probably. I wonder how one would go about finding out info like this way back in the 20s and 30s?

Our little history group went over 14,000 minutes and 1,000 calls for October! If you are not using WorldxChange you may be paying to much for your long distance calls. And their international rates are nothing to sneeze at either. http://www.worldxchange.com/agent/228072

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Butch, The following is from Bill Geiss. He is the grandson of Ellsworth Collins, the man that used to own the whole Turner Falls area. Collins built the little buildings" for tourists to look at. As sort of a tourist trap. He wanted them to stop and look. The buildings are not tall enough for even Bill to stand up in, and he is only about 5' 8" tall. They never served any other purpose. The only buildings that were used are on the east side of Honey Creek. And there was never a ranch there. Ellsworth Collins was Dean of Education at OU for a while and he was a collector. The Cowboy Hall of Fame Museum has a hugh barb wire collection. It is now one of their prime permanent exhibits. It was largely donated by the heirs of Collins. Collins heirs gave Turner Falls to the city of Davis. Also donated the land that became Camp Classen." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/tfalls10q.jpg
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"Funny you should mention those little rock buildings up in the hills of Turner Falls. I was up there just a couple of weeks ago during the craft fair. I took a walk up to the falls and also took some time to climb up to the buildings. The buildings were once the headquarters for the Collins Ranch. On one old rock gate is a sign that says "Wyld Acre". (There's a story behind that name, but I can't remember it.) There is also a sign that tells a little about Mr. Collins and about the architectural style. The structures are really fascinating. They are all separate from each other, connected only by pathways. Several are multi-story structures with stairways barely wide enough for a medium-sized person to climb. Most of the buildings have a fireplace, and the ceilings are not much more than 6 feet high. It's hard to tell which rooms were living quarters and which were for sleeping. I'm sure they were probably multi-functional. I found nothing that resembled a kitchen, but there were several outdoor cooking areas....fire pits, rock fireplaces, and rock picnic tables. What made the biggest impression on me was not the fascinating old buildings, but the TERRIBLE state of disrepair!! The buildings were filled with trash, doors were either barely hanging on rusted hinges or completely torn off, and the effects of vandalism were evident throughout. Graffiti is everywhere! I think the city of Davis (if they are still in charge of the park) should be ASHAMED!! These buildings are a part of local history, and are being destroyed by lack of care and supervision. I would hate to see them made off limits to the public, but perhaps that is what it will take to preserve them. Maybe that's not the answer, but something most definitely needs to be done before it's too late. So much for my soap box lecture of the day. I'm curious if anyone else has been there recently and has the same impression. Turner Falls, in general, is still one of the most beautiful places in our area."
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"I remember Muncie Reese as a teacher. One of her students in my class (I won't print his name) was chewing tobacco when he came in to class. He was much larger than Mrs. Reese, but she made him swallow it. Someone put her stool up on top of a filing cabinet by her desk and she couldn't get it down. I guess someone got it down for her. She was good natured about everything though. What I didn't much like in highschool was having to memorize poems. Julia Sparger was English teacher and she was about half the size of her husband. When I left to go to college the person who interviewed me said that I would not have a good background in math, but my English would be very good. He told me that when he found out I was from Ardmore. This was right after the Korean war and all the men teachers were drafted. We had a few good math and geography teachers back then though."
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"Butch, this makes me laugh. It is so funny, but I realize it was not funny then. As an ex-junior high and highschool teacher, I am relieved that you boys never got into trouble again. But the story brings back memories of the days when I was teaching kids just like you were!!!"
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"Hi Butch. Just wanted to say thank you for recommending to eat at the Broadway Cafe. My sister treva; her son Jeremy who is 13 & myself went there tonight for supper & had one of those delicious hamburgers you talked about. That was the best homemade hamburger & french fries I have eaten in a long time!!! What a change from the other hamburger places here in town!! We WILL be going back down there. Again thanks for recommending it. I am really enjoying the memories of Washington School. I went there also & so did all my brothers & sisters. What memories!! So sad it burned down! Still enjoying your weekly T&T.Keep up the good work!"
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"Enjoyed all the emails in the last T and T about Washington School, too! I very narrowly escaped a paddling by Mr. Connely when after school one day, Ricky Dickson tried to start an argument/scuffle out on the back steps of the school with me and we both got sent to the office...WHEW, I never was so scared! Wonder what's happened to Tommy Little and Peggy Mize, etc. Last I heard, Tommy worked at the auto center out at Ward's before it closed. Tommy and I used to ride our tricycles around the neighborhood and gather pop bottles to spend on candy at Hunt's grocery store. Peggy rode up to our house on a horse one day and was trying to find homes for some stray puppies...I always thought that was a very kind thing to do...That story about you and Jimmy Echer getting into trouble was very interesting, too. Glad the judge showed you both mercy...Sure wish Jimmy was still here...his Mom, Mary Margaret, gave me one of his paintings when I babysat her grandson one summer. She said a lot of them were ruined (what a shame and a tragedy) when they were in a little storage building out back of their house a few years ago, so she wanted me to have it. It wasn't one of his better ones, but I'll keep and treasure it nonetheless! The one he did of Archie Bunker (Carrol O'Conner) was excellent!" rindy919@swbell.net
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"The mention of car "boots" made me think of a story a friend told me about his visit to Australia. Instead of garage sales, they have what they call "car boot sales". Everyone packs up their unwanted junk, loads it in the "boot" of the car and heads to a local field where they have what resembles a big flea market. No prices are marked. You just sit around and dicker all day to get the best bargain. My kind of place!!!"
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"Butch, you mentioned Boise City in this weeks T&T. I lived in Colorado just North of Boise City for awhile. We went there to shop now and then and to team ropings. Did you know that Boise City is the only US mainland city to be bombed during WWII? Check it out some time. Of course it was a mistake and it was one of our planes that dropped a bomb on the county courthouse."
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"Dear Butch: Really enjoyed the Judge Earl Brown story...so that is why you are such a good guy? As for the 1917 First Train in Healdton story. I have one of the original post cards that my dad sent us. He was here in Healdton and we were in Kansas. I was just a new baby, at the time. Well we came to Healdton on that train when I was only 9 mos. old. In the second picture you can see a man on the back of the train. That conductor, on the very back of the train, was Charlie Parker's Dad. Charlie worked, here, for a number of years for International Supply, I believe, and later on for Red Man. He was a great guy. He died in May of 1985, and his wife, Leota, ,just died on June 7, this year. I thought it was interesting that someone that lived here was the son of the conductor on the first train into Healdton. Incidently I had an e-mail from our, dyed in the wool, railroad fan Dwane Stevens, who was really excited about the same postcard offered on e-bay....and he was bidding on it. I love Dwane's enthusiasm, as it kinda parallels my interest in trains, but he goes into it deeper than I do. I have been happy to join him on some of his photo-ops of trains. My son, Alan, also is a train fan, and has a collection of pictures from all sources, and also takes pictures on his own. He has made, really nice, wooden models and always gives me books, on trains, for my birthdays or Christmas."
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"Healdton Pictures Web Page" http://home.rmci.net/farrar/healdton.htm
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"Hey Butch, do you or any of your readers have a picture of the old 2 story house that once sat on 5th N.E., where the apartments are now. 6th and MLK."
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"Butch, the Greater SW Historical Museum used to be on the Carter Co website but I can't find it. Could you, in your spare time, ha, send their website address to me?" http://home.swbell.net/bhamm10/
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"I was wondering if anyone remembered the "squeeze in" that was located on East Main in Ardmore, I think in the late 30's or early 40's. Any information or photos would be nice. I need it for a project I am doing."
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"Butch, someone in your T&T today inquired about oil companies during 1919. My older brother, the late Richard D. Fronterhouse, wrote a research paper about oil development in Carter County during the 1920's. A copy is located in the Healdton Oil Museum in Healdton, OK, and it was published last year in the Healdton Herald's Oilpatch Mania. I don't know if this would help your reader or not, but the research article does contain references."
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"Dear Butch, Was Judge Brown the son of Henry Harlan Brown (1871-1940) and Alice Vance Brown (1875-1831) by any chance? Both H. H. and Alice are buried in Ardmore's Rosehill Cemetery, and H. H. or "Harlan" as he was known, was a well known Ardmore attorney and was part of the prosecution team in the trial of Clara Smith Hamon in 1921 when she was accused of murdering Jake Hamon. The jury found her not guilty in one of the most sensational trials in Ardmore's history. Harlan was my great uncle. He was the brother of my grandfather, Kelly Brown, who was also an attorney, and one of the early state congressmen from Ardmore after Oklahoma achieved statehood in 1907."
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"Hi Butch, I just wanted to tell the readers that I experienced MAGNETIC HILL for myself today! I am certainly impressed!!!!!!!! I stopped as I went down the hill (completely stopped) and immediately started backing up the hill. I then went all the way to the corner, turned around and headed back toward hiway 53, stopping at the first low spot and put it in neutral. I started climbing. My car reached as much as 20 mi. per. hr. then started very slowly getting a little slower, 15 then 10 etc. for quite a way. By the time I had come to a complete stop I was 2/10 of a mile from hiway 53. I drive a Buick Century so it is not like a pregnant roller skate. lol lol My husband was with me and he also was quite amazed. This could not be an optical illusion could it?"
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================================================

"I'm a little boy with glasses
The one they call the geek
A little girl who never smiles
'Cause I've got braces on my teeth And I know how it feels
To cry myself to sleep

I'm that kid on every playground
Who's always chosen last
A single teenage mother
Tryin' to overcome my past
You don't have to be my friend
But is it too much to ask

Don't laugh at me
Don't call me names
Don't get your pleasure from my pain
In God's eyes we're all the same
Someday we'll all have perfect wings
Don't laugh at me

I'm the cripple on the corner
You've passed me on the street
And I wouldn't be out here beggin'
If I had enough to eat
And don't think I don't notice
That our eyes never meet

I lost my wife and little boy when
Someone cross that yellow line
The day we laid them in the ground
Is the day I lost my mind
And right now I'm down to holdin'
This little cardboard sign...so

Don't laugh at me
Don't call me names
Don't get your pleasure from my pain
In God's eyes we're all the same
Someday we'll all have perfect wings
Don't laugh at me

I'm fat, I'm thin, I'm short, I'm tall
I'm deaf, I'm blind, hey, aren't we all

Don't laugh at me
Don't call me names
Don't get your pleasure from my pain
In God's eyes we're all the same
Someday we'll all have perfect wings
Don't laugh at me."

-Mark Willis, Country Singer 2002

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 2
Lone Grove, Oklahoma 73443

Saturday October 26, 2002 T&T Weekly Vol 6 Issue 288

Back in the early 60s when I was in the 7th Grade at Ardmore Junior High School, me and my childhood friend, Jimmy Echer, got into some serious mischief, as boys tend to do at that age. On a Sunday afternoon we were at Cardinal Park on East Main and "in a moment of thoughtlessness" as the judge worded it, decided to break out some windows at the "ticket building" next to the ballpark. A man was nearby with his boy flying a radio controlled model airplane, and saw us do it. Needless to say the police came to the Junior High Tuesday afternoon and confronted me and Jimmy, which we quickly confessed to doing. At that time County Judge Earl Brown was working closely with problem kids. Our parents took us to see him at the courthouse to find out what punishment he would impose on us for our wrongdoing. Judge Brown was the nicest man and very understanding with us. He agreed to let our parents replace the broken windows with our promise to never do such a thing again. Two boys could never have been more relieved because our imaginations ran wild as we sat before him. I just knew we were going to prison. And we, or at least I never got into any trouble again, and that is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help me God.

At was at this same time that we got into trouble as kids, that Judge Earl Brown was helping put together the first Children's Shelter and Juvenile Officer to serve Ardmore. Judge Brown was concerned about the troubled young people of Ardmore, and he became involved in many programs that helped kids. He was awarded the Silver Beaver Award by the Boy Scouts, the highest honor offered. He received a 40 year Honor of Merit Award for perfect attendance from the Ardmore Kiwanis Club. He organized the first Gideon Chapter in Ardmore. He was Postmaster for 23 years. After his 8 years as County Judge, he was appointed as Special Judge and after his retirement in 1970 he served in the Small Claims Court. And the list goes on and on, but his greatest contribution was to his church. For 47 years he was teacher at Worth Men's Bible Class at First Baptist here in Ardmore. But I don't need to read his accomplishments to know that Earl Brown was a wonderful human being and Christian. I had a 1-on-1 experience with him in Junior High that set me on the right path and probably played a important part in where I am today. Here is a photo of Judge Earl A. Brown (1893-1974). http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/earlbrown.jpg

A Reader sent me a link to a photo taken in 1917 at Healdton, Oklahoma depicting the first train to arrive in Healdton. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/heald17a.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/heald17b.jpg

Last week we talked about Ardmore born author Harrell McCullough. Here is a pic of Harrell from his self published book about his grandpa U.S. Marshal Selden Lindsey. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/mccullough1.jpg

A Reader from Ardmore who now lives in Colorado sent me some pics of bells taken in Boise City, Oklahoma. For you who do not know your Oklahoma geography very well, Boise City is in the very far west end of the Oklahoma panhandle in No Mans Land (19 miles from Colorado). This first picture is a bell at Cimarron Heritage Center in Boise City. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/boise3.jpg These next three is a bell at the Good Shepard Catholic Church in Boise City. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/boise4.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/boise5.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/boise6.jpg

A couple of weeks ago we talked about the electrical re-wiring going on at the courthouse. The Osborn Electricians out of OKC are boring several 3 inch holes through the 13 inch thick concrete floors. He is a pic I took of one of those thick concrete cores they bored out on the first floor. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/chcore.jpg

I got to snap some shots of Turner Falls up in the Arbuckle Mountains north of Ardmore the other day. One pic is of those little building built on the side of the mountain along Honey Creek near the Falls. Does anyone remember the story behind those little rock buildings? One thing for sure, I truly believe Turner Falls is one of the most beautiful spots in Oklahoma! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/tfalls10p.jpg

I have some pepper sauce made in California by The Pepper Plant that tastes exactly as I remember Lt McKerson's BBQ sauce back in the 60s. This sauce is not the exact same texture, but the taste is identical. I found a website called pugsly.com that sells the "Original California Style" sauce at $4.95 for a 10 ounce bottle. I'm still looking for a pic of Lt McKerson's BBQ stand that was on East Main. Maybe someone out there has a photo? This sauce in CA is made by The Pepper Plant in Atascadero, CA 1-800-5414355. Also a link to a pic of this BBQ sauce. http://www.pugsly.com/Pepper_Plant.htm http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/ltmcbbq.jpg

Last Saturday night Oct 21 around 9:30pm a 3.3 earthquake rumbled south of Atoka, Oklahoma. It was felt as far away as Durant. I talked to a friend at the post office and asked if he felt it. He said he and his wife were sitting in the living room and when the tremor came through, he asked his wife, "what in the world is that"? He said they even found items that fell off shelves in their house, the tremor was that strong. About three times a year Oklahoma has small earthquakes. There has even been recorded epicenters in western Carter county near Wilson not too long ago. Oklahoma has not been famous for earthquakes, thank goodness, but one never knows where one will hit.

We talked about mailwasher a few weeks ago, and I installed it this past week. It really works great! It let's you look at your email, even preview them, before downloading them to your computer. This way you can delete them, and bounce them back to the spammer as if you never downloaded them. This is great for junk mail. It tries to determine if mail is junk mail and mark them as such beforehand. But sometimes it misses one. I had ordered an Internet Explorer 6 CD from microsoft.com this week and when they sent me my order confirmation by email, mailwasher marked the email as spam. hahahahaha Anyway, it works good and if you have a hotmail account, it even works with that Server too. Check it all out at http://www.mailwasher.net

It looks like our history group will go over 14,000 minutes this month using WorldxChange. After 12 months of using their long distance service, many of us know we are saving money on our phone bills. You can too! http://www.worldxchange.com/agent/228072

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"In 1957 or 1959 a group met to honor the selection of an all-star football team for the first fifty years from Ardmore High School. Does anyone have this list? My Dad was on it and I really would like a copy of the article."
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"Butch, I was just looking at the Brown Spring site, the image of the child is there, but there seems to be another image in the picture, it is in the shadow on the tombstone, it looks like the face of a woman. My wife and I have enjoyed the pictures of Young, Baum, and Wheeler schools, I think just about every member of my family was in the Young picture. My mother Bernice Williams said it was taken after church about a year before the Berwyn school was opened, about 1935. My wife Wanda Kirby Williams was in the Wheeler picture, she has since been writing to Sue, one of her class mates whom she hasn't seen in a few years (wasn't that nice of me) we enjoy t&t so keep of the good work." -Jerry Williams in Amarillo, Texas wanwil@arn.net
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"I read with interest your remark that the trunk of a car in England is called a boot. Also the hood is called the bonnet."
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"Hey Butch. good job as ever. Re: the book you referred to about Sulphur, there is a copy of it at the Chickasaw Library. I looked at it, it is a photocopy of an original book. I was interested in the part about the 'Landrum' section. That part was in reference to a Senator E.M Landrum, a Cherokee Indian whom the author was thanking for seconding the nomination of a Chickasaw for U.S. Senate. I have done extensive research on the Landrum ancestry, but have not come across that particular name, so back to genealogy.com HA."
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"Hi Butch, Here you go some England cockney slang: Apples & Pears = Stairs Johnie Horner = Corner Jack & Jill = Hill Rabbit & Pork = Talk Whistle & Flute = Suit Jam Jar = Car Plates of meat = Feet Bin Lids = Kids ( The lid of your garbage container maybe ) Trouble & Strife = The wife Porky Pies = Lies Dog & Bone = phone Currant Bun = The sun North & South = Your mouth Daisy Roots = Boots (Footwear)
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"Butch, the party who remembered Mrs. Bishop at the high school was right. Muncie Reese WAS the History teacher there for about a zillion years. When I was in high school in the mid fifties, we used to have secret desire day and Muncie always came as a bride!!! I remember hearing about Mrs. Bishop although she was gone by the time I got to AHS. Muncie always liked the boys better than the girls. The boys could get away with anything but the girls got "the look". She was so short she sat on a stool. She was very intimidating. She got her hair done at the same beauty shop as my mom and whenever she was there, I stayed outside!!!"
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"Ms Ringer was a very tough teacher I remember one time she got into a little trouble. There was two boys in my 5th grade class at Washington School it must have been in 1961 or 1962 can't remember but any way. One of these boys was at the pencil sharpener and he stab the other boy in the arm with a pencil the boy began to cry and Ms Ringer came over and took a pencil from the boy that had stab the other boy and stab him several times in the arm I remember it drew blood and the boy cried and his parents were called. Ms Ringer was called to Mr. Connley's office but she was back in class the next day if I remember correctly. I had to stay I after school almost everyday in Ms Ringer's class for some infraction and she would always give us candy when it was time to go home saying we should get a paddling but she would give us candy instead. I also remember her making us name the pictures on the wall Blue Boy , The Gleaners and so on, she was also a good artist I leaned a lot from Ms Ringer. Abraham Lincoln was her favorite person in the world I guess One day she had us write a poem as home work, well like always "Old Luther" didn't do it . So she got me up in front of the class and said to make up a poem, well I did. "Three cheers for Old Abe Lincoln he is in his grave died and stinken." Well another paddling and after school again for "Old Luther" When it was time to go home Ms Ringer said she had not paddled me because it was a bad poem it was the subject and the content of the poem that got me into trouble. Ms Ringer would read us poetry, she would always read it the way the poet would have read it. Always tiring to teach us of the wonderful things in life. To me she was a great teacher there should be more like her today. Mr. Stamper was also one of my teachers he had what he called a 70 list anyone making below 70 got a swat with his paddle well Old Luther never made more that 30 or 35 so I got the paddle almost daily , One time Mr. Stamper said Luther There are 14 words on this spelling test if you spell 7 right I well give you a tootsie roll pop sucker. Well in my way of thinking a tootsie roll pop suckers sold for 2 cents and a pop bottle sold for 2 cents so I told Mr. Stamper I could sell a pop bottle and get me one of them tootsie roll pop suckers at Basil Moran's store, well here we go again Old Luther got paddled before and after the spelling test if I remember correctly. Ms Ringer and Mr. Stamper were my favorite teacher at Washington School I also remember Mr. Biles, Ms Whitmore, Ms Zomwalt, Ms Sherman, and Ms Hudgens. We move around a lot when I was in school I went to Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, and Dickson as well as school in Duncan, Fredrick, Walters, and in Arkansas, Indiana, We work alot pulling cotton in Western Okla. around Altas, Fredrick, and Walters we would be gone from Ardmore while the season for cotton was on and come back when it was over we went to Indiana an picked tomatoes and to Arkansas and picked peaches never made it to CA we was to broke to go that far I guess. Washington School was my favorite of all the many schools I went to. It made me sad when it burned down a lot of childhood memories of dear friends long ago Winston "Cheesy"Jefferson, Kenny Tate, Linda Goodin, Peggy Mize, the Dickson boys, Donna lllnisky, Tommy Little, Lloyd Lee Wickwire, Wanda Lloyd, Edward Marr, Charles Carter, Robert Miller, William Lee, Charles Lee, George Walker, just to name a few."
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"While going thru some of the pictures at your website, I discovered the pictures of the old Milo Baptist Church which were taken right before and after it was burned. What makes me feel so old (AMONG OTHER THINGS!) is that I remember when they tore down part of the old Milo school/church building, dragged the smaller rooms about 40 yards to the west, and built onto them to create the "new" church, which is now the "old" one that burned. I believe it was finished about 1953. Since then I have attended more funerals in that building than I can count, due to the fact that both sides of my family, back to three sets of great-grandparents, lived and are buried there. On the happier side, I am attaching a couple of pictures of the now-NEW church, taken back in May---one shot of the outside and one of the unfinished sanctuary. I hear that it is now virtually complete and in at least partial use, and that the dedication day is set for in November---the third, I believe. I haven't seen it since May, but I am sure it must look great by now. Maybe some of your readers live there and can fill us in on the dedication plans." -Keith Ward, Oklahoma City http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/milonew3.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/milonew4.jpg
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"Butch, here is a picture of the first and second grade in Woodford School in 1944, which contains four of my cousins on both sides of my family. The first girl in the back row is my second cousin Ann Lowe (now Rempel); the names of the others, courtesy of her, are as follows: Back row---Ann Lowe, Charles Allen, Gayle McGoodwin (my third cousin), Charles Scoggins (went by the name Sonny Satterwhite at the time, while living with his Satterwhite grand-parents),______?, Charles? Wallace, and Barbara Rice. The second row are Jack Ward (my first cousin on my dad's side), Nelda Pender, Kenneth Clowdus, _____?_____, Venita Lynn McGoodwin (Gayle's sister; my third cousin), Donelda Smith, and Wanda Tippit. You have a picture of the former Woodford school building among the pictures on your web site, taken about 1923 I believe. The one in this picture, the only one I remember, was a nice, solid old rock building which was later gutted by fire and later fell down to the extent it had to be razed. My mother graduated at Woodford in 1930 or 1931, and it recently dawned on me that I don't know which building was there then. I'm sure she attended the old one, but possibly the new one was there before she graduated. Maybe some of your readers will know." -Keith Ward, Oklahoma City http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/wood1944.jpg
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"Hi, Mr. Bridges. My husband's cousin Opal Hartsill Brown also wrote many and published many history books on Oklahoma. She was a teacher also. She was raised in Sulphur area. Just thought you might be interested."
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Butch: Possible omission re: grocery stores. Heartsill's on corner of B & 5th SW in Ardmore. I worked there 1947-48. Good family. Brothers Virgil and Vernon Straughn. One was the best softball pitcher in the world. I learned a while back that there was a national T.V. cable award named after Larry Boggs who started the TV cable business in Ardmore. I talked to a man who won it one year. Thanks for your good work. You are a great smile maker."
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"We have some ties to Oklahoma. My father, Carl M. Goen graduated from Wilson High School in 1926. He was born in Purcell in 1907. My grandfather, Jesse Dillard Goen was married to Ora Lee Smith in Purcell about 1906. Her second husband was C.D.White and he had a tin shop in Wilson. In the 1900 census, my great grandfather, Joseph Franklin Goen and his family were living near Chickasaw. Dallas White Smith, father of Ora Lee is buried at Wilson Cemetery. His first wife was Ollie Mooney and she is buried at Free-O cemetery north of Healdton. Llena Goen, my aunt, was married to Everett Burris. She as born 1910 in Hewitt which is now part of Wilson. Am interested in contacting anyone who might have info on these surnames." -Paul Lynn Goen, Albuquerque, NM lynn-betty@worldnet.att.net
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"Butch, here is a neat site, it lists all the hoaxes on the web." http://hoaxbusters.ciac.org/
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"I live in California and I'm researching my family history: I am the great grandson of Nathaniel C. and Mary Frances Griffin. They lived in Davis, Oklahoma from 1920 to 1943. Nathaniel died in 1931 and Mary Frances died in 1943. They are both buried in Davis, at the Green Hill Cemetery. Their children were: 1. Julius Griffin, my grandfather, who married Lula Sarah Hogan. They moved to California in 1937. 2. Fanny Griffin, who married George Batterton. They are both buried in the Green Hill Cemetery. They had four children, Silas, Ernest, Mildred and an unknown. Fanny and George owned the Busy Bee Restaurant in Davis. 3. Ada Griffin, who married Walter R. South. They are buried in the Green Hill Cemetery. They had three children, Pearle, Mary Frances and Luther. 4. Claude Griffin who is buried in Green Hill Cemetery. 5. Fleda Griffin, no information. Julius and Lula Griffin lived in Davis and Sulphur. They had a fruit stand on Highway 77 between Davis and Wynnewood. Their children were: 1. Wanda Griffin, my mother 2. Elmer Griffin 3. Albert Griffin 4. Glayds Griffin 5. Raymond Griffin 6. Ollie Griffin 7. Beulah Griffin. I hope to hear from someone, I appreciate your help. I will be happy to answer any questions about the family history, or tree. Hope to hear from someone, thanks again, Ronny Rhoades 164 Madison Ave., San Rafael, CA 94903. Ph 415 479 0176 rrhoades@mindspring.com
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"A number of years ago I read a book published (in 1935) by Motorbooks International about service station memorabilia, particularly logos on signs and pumps, etc., and it included a directory of oil companies that existed at one time, often with a description of what happened to them. Selected items in the directory were pretty interesting, telling how companies merged or changed their names, etc." http://www.motorbooks.com/cgi-bin/WebObjects/mbi.woa/wa/default
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"Many newspapers with today's technologies have thrown out all the old issues on paper because of the space required to store them and the impracticality of scanning all the old issues. The Oklahoma Historical Society went through a great project a number of years ago and microfilmed the archives of every newspaper in the state they could find. (The newspapers cooperated on this, of course.) For many, perhaps most, newspapers those are the only archives from pre-computer days. You have to reserve time on their microfilm readers since this is a very popular source and very difficult to search as they are merely arranged by the date of the paper. But you'll find some real gems in there."
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My 153 page Jul, Aug, Sept 2002 Collection of T&Ts is at the printers. The pages and format has now been approved and next is printing. After that the binding, and then shipping! Over 60 of the 100 copies have already been reserved, so if you want one of these plain vanilla books, send me email. There may be a long time before another printing of this particular series. The cost is $7 each with $3 shipping. And I'll include one of my free History CDs with the book! If you live out of town and dont have email, call me Toll Free at 1-866-459-8626 to reserve a book. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bookcover.html

"Let us consider the reasons of the case. For nothing is law that is not reason."
Sir John Powell, English judge (1633-1696)

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 2
Lone Grove, Oklahoma 73443

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Saturday October 19, 2002 T&T Weekly Vol 6 Issue 287

Based on the all the responses I got last weekend about my proposed 150 page book, I went ahead and ordered 100 copies to be printed. They will be ready in a week. Some of you even told me in person to hold a copy for you. I will do my best. I do not know how long 100 copies will last, and I may not print another run of Jul, Aug, Sep 2002 issues. If things go well, I may print T&Ts from Apr, May and Jun 2002 next time. As soon as the present order arrives, I will notified those of you who asked me for a copy, some of you wanted several copies. The cost will be $7 each plus $3 shipping for a dated and autographed copy. A free History CD will be included. Those of you in Ardmore can save the shipping if you want to, just give me a call. Here is a sneak preview of the plain vanilla cover: http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bookcover.html

A Reader sent me a link to an item on eBay this week. It is a 1908 book is authored and published by a couple of people from Sulphur, Oklahoma. By looking at the pics, the book sure looks interesting. Wish I had the book.... no telling what history lies between its covers! The name of the book is: "The Lure of the Indian Country and a Romance of Its Great Resort". Author: Oleta Littleheart. Publisher: A. Abbott, Sulphur OK. First Edition 1908. 153 pages on a scarce piece of Murray County & Sulphur history. Oleta Littleheart's text tells the tale of the creation of Sulphur from Chickasaw lands. It is a fascinating first hand account of life in turn of the century in Oklahoma and makes reference to the pioneers of the day, the creation of the Frisco & other rail lines, noted Chiefs & Senators, etc. Wonderful photographic illustrations and period advertisements. Contents Headings are as follows: Donald MacDonald, Medicine Springs, Platt National Park, Authula Sensation, White Husband Association, Council Chief Porter, William H. Murray, Haskell Betrothal, Washington, Flagler, Mexico, Yaquis, Robert Galbreath, Statehood, Landrum, Swords. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/thelure.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/thelure2.jpg

Speaking of books by local people, a Reader loaned me a book titled, "Selden Lindsey - US Deputy Marshal" by Harrell McCullough, grandson of Selden Lindsey. Harrell McCullough (1913-1999) was born here in Ardmore. As a child he lived at the end of South Washington, on the south side of McCullough Street SW. Now we know who the street was named after, his family! Badman Bill Dalton was killed near Pooleville, Oklahoma on June 8, 1894. Back then Pooleville was Elk, Oklahoma. Harrell is the grandson of Selden Lindsey. According to Harrell's book, outlaw Bill Dalton robbed a bank in Longview, Texas then hid out in a cabin west of Pooleville (NE Carter County). Deputy Marshal Selden Lindsey went to Pooleville to arrest Dalton, and Dalton ended up being shot by Lindsey. There is a historical marker paid for and erected by Harrell McCullough on the property by the road where Dalton was killed. Selden Lindsey lived 2 miles east of Dickson, Oklahoma and then north next to Wolf Creek where it empties into the Washita River. I'll have to get up to Pooleville soon and take a photo of that historical marker about U.S. Deputy Marshal Selden Lindsey. Harrell McCullough must have been one amazing recorder of history, wish I could have met him before he died in 1999. Here is a scan of Harrell McCullough's self-published 300 page book. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/lindseyst.jpg

The following obit was printed in The Daily Ardmoreite on October 14, 1999: "Memorial interment for Harrell McCullough will be at 10 a.m. Monday, Oct. 18, 1999, at Rose Hill Cemetery under the direction of Griffin-Kennedy-Watts Funeral Home. Mr. McCullough, age 86, was born May 5, 1913, in Ardmore, Okla., the only son of Carle and Quintella Lindsey McCullough. Mr. McCullough, beloved parent, cousin, mentor and friend, passed away on Oct. 7, 1999, at Oklahoma City. His family and dear friends feel a grievous, poignant loss which defies expression. Harrell worked for the U.S. Employment Service from 1936 to 1942, managing the Norman, Okla. office, where he was responsible for the then innovative idea of establishing an employment office on the University of Oklahoma campus. The New York times reported in June 1938 on this first student placement service to be operated by any state at any university. From 1942 to 1946, McCullough served with distinction as an armed guard commander in the U.S. Navy; most of his World War II service was as a lieutenant on the U.S. Latona, escorting troop and supply convoys across the Atlantic and throughout the Mediterranean. After World War II, he worked as an industrial economist for the Bureau of Labor Statistics and private firms in the Chicago area and taught economics in Ohio, Louisiana and at Oklahoma City University. He retired from Central State University at Edmond, Okla., in 1975. In 1990, after some 15 years of team research with a younger cousin, Mr. McCullough realized a lifelong dream by publishing a biography of his grandfather and historical vignette of the waning days of the Old West in Indian Territory. In 1992 his book Selden Lindsey, U.S. Deputy Marshal, was awarded the coveted Certificate of Commendation by the prestigious American Association of State and Local History, in recognition of Mr. McCullough?s life contributions to the preservation of Oklahoma history. Selden Lindsey was a pioneer U.S. Deputy Marshall for 16 years before Oklahoma statehood. Lindsey pursued and dispatched (among many others) the infamous outlaw, Bill Dalton, in June 1894. Early in his career, Selden took prisoners to Judge Isaac Parker?s Federal Court in Fort Smith, Ark.; later, federal courts were established first in Paris, Texas, and subsequently in Ardmore. Selden's grandfather, Elijah Lindsey, is celebrated as the Father of Arkansas Methodism, the first Methodist preacher in Arkansas, riding his Strawberry River circuit in northeast Arkansas as early as 1815. The Eli Lindsey Memorial Methodist Church, in Jessup, Ark., was dedicated in 1949 to his memory, with historical markers erected at the church, on Highway 117 near Jessup, and at the site of Lindsey's log adobe near Big Creek, about 16 miles northeast of Batesville, Ark. Stories of his ministry in the wilderness are still extolled in the area. Following his antecedents' examples, Harrell McCullough was active in civic affairs and championed excellence in education in Oklahoma while working tirelessly to preserve Oklahoma and Arkansas historical sites, pioneer cemeteries and endangered public records and documents. Mr. McCullough is survived by a large, extended family, including his daughter, Natasha Joan Williamson; a granddaughter, Robin Potter; and two great-grandsons, Leland and Guthrie Potter, all of Santa Fe, N.M.; one sister, Mrs. Christine McCollom; niece Ms. Leslie McCollom; nephew, Forrest H. Armstrong; aunt, Mrs. Zoma Lindsey Barricklow; cousins, Nina Fayrene Stone, Judy Lindsey Brown and Rena Lindsey Marsh, all of Ardmore; Gloria Schouw Reck of Diamond Bar, Calif.; beloved and devoted friend, Mildred DeVore, of Oklahoma City. Harrell's beloved elder sisters, Vivian Mae McCullough and Nina Vinita Ackerman, predeceased him. Mr. McCullough?s expressed sentiment was the wish that memorials be made to any animal protection society or shelter location. Harrell McCullough was very dear to his family and friends. His gentle, generous, witty and compassionate presence will be sorely missed by all who knew him, but our precious memories of Harrell and our wonderful times together will surely comfort and sustain us."

A number of you wrote me last weekend asking for the OklahomaHistory.net email address. My free offer is still good for any Reader who has use of an alternate mail address. Example: bridges@OklahomaHistory.net Just let me know and I'll set it up.

Two weeks ago I had a typo in my article about what they call the trunk of their cars in England. Across the Big Pond they call it the boot. And now you know! St Michael's Episcopal Church in Oklahoma City is located just north of 89th and South Penn on Penn. They have a very old bell mounted in front of the church. There is a heavy chain that is used to ring the bell and call worshipers to church services every week. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/stmichb2.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/stmichb3.jpg

Does anyone have info on an Ardmore company long ago named Peerless Oil Company, 1919? It was connected somehow, maybe preceded Wirt Franklin Oil of Ardmore? If anyone can help or tell me how to find out more about this company, I would really appreciate it. Send me some email or call me toll free at 1-866-459-8626

A few weeks ago I told about using the SHIFT key and the DELETE key together and permanently delete emails in your Outlook Express. I been using it everyday, getting rid of all that junk mail, spam, and porn emails I get everyday. Works great! When you are looking at an email in your Inbox, with it highlighted, just hold the SHIFT key down and hit the Delete key. A box will pop up asking if you want to permanently delete this message, Yes or No.

Our little history group is heading for a record month using WorldxChange. Saving money on long distance calls is what its all about. You can start saving on your very next call! http://www.worldxchange.com/agent/228072

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"If you form a triangle with Graham and Woodford being on the bottom Elk is at the top. It was north and west of Springer. Southeast of Tussy. It is on the foot of the SW side of the Arbuckle Mountains according to my map of the Chickasaw Nation!"
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"I am currently renting a 101 year old house in Ada, Oklahoma consisting of 18 rooms with a ballroom on the third floor. Needles to say, in it's day it must have been spectacular. I am constantly hearing stories of murder and haunting and whatever else that goes with an old house. I was wondering if you had any information regarding 905 South Broadway, Ada OK. I was also hoping if you do would you share it, and if you do not, could you send me in the right direction. Our Local newspapers are not current with today's technology and their archives can only go back 14 days. I tried the Oklahoman out of OKC but there search engine is extremely limited. Anything will be greatly appreciated."
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"Butch, I am attaching a little dittie that I wrote on Sept 11, 2001. By coincidence, my oldest son, Don Jr, called me a couple of weeks later and out of the blue said he just wanted to tell me he loved me and to thank me for raising him and providing for him all those childhood years. What a shock! A pleasant one, though, and I thought that your readers in T&T might be happy to hear that a son was so thoughtful. -Don Bridges (Sr, or course) http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/textfiles/memories.txt
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"Butch, There has been a lot of discussion recently in T&T regarding Washington Elementary, its teachers and children. I also attended Washington Elementary in the 1950s and have fond memories of Mrs. Whitmore, Mrs. Sherman, Mrs. Carson, Miss Norris, Mrs. Ringer, Mrs. Thompson, and Mr. Gilliam. I have attached a photo of Mrs. Ringer's 5th class, made May 26, 1954. I am standing on the left end of the third row next to Tommy Jacobs. Mrs. Ringer is in the middle standing behind Charlene Ellis. Thanks for T&T." -Doyle Williams http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/washsc54.jpg
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"You can buy local honey produced by E.L. Morton in glass quart jars at Key's Uptown-Downtown Grocery on East Broadway for $6.49."
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"Hi Butch, I am a beekeeper in Montana and caught your alarm in the rise in honey prices there. Don't feel alone. There is a world shortage and supply and demand has brought prices up by a factor of at least %300. Last December beekeepers here were selling truckloads of honey in barrels for 48 and 49 cents a pound. The low price was due to foreign imports (NAFTA). The last report I heard this week was of a beekeeper in eastern Montana selling 2 truckloads for $1.60 per pound. Yields in the northwest have been small this year so an increase in price is good news for the producer. Hopefully next year we will see some moderation and things will be back to normal. In the meantime rest assured your local honey man is not gouging you and is merely following the national pricing trend. P.S. Thanks for choosing honey as your sweetener of choice. Be careful of white sugar, it'll decay your teeth. Honey contains hydrogen peroxide and actually helps promote good oral hygiene." -Apiaries of Montana, Raw Honey-Beeswax, Pollen-Propolis 406-375-9443 honey@montana.com
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"After Sundown" By Lou Harper, Thackerville, Oklahoma luharper@brightok.net

As the air seems to develop a chill and the mornings whisper of change, my thoughts turn to the mystery of Brown's Springs once again.

Is there any truth to the tales that circulate? That is a question to be answered by each individual who visits the spring and the "Old Indian Cemetery."

It is a place that time has forgotten, a place which has the power to draw you into its web of mystery, eager to learn its truths. You will leave no wiser, just more curious and perhaps a bit jittery.

I live just four miles from Brown's Springs and I am familiar with the twisting dirt roads and trails which lead there as well as the more common route. Long years ago I trekked through the dense woods of that area on an autumn day. I came upon a sight I had never seen before. Two snakes appeared to be doing battle and finally one snake devoured the other! Perhaps that was an ordinary occurrence, but not to me when it happens near Browns' Springs.

The area is an ideal habitat for snakes of all kinds. Those most important to watch out for are the deadly Copperheads and Rattlesnakes. It is their domain, not ours, and they reign supreme.

Far more disturbing than the natural dangers of that dark and gloomy place, are the whispered rumors of a creature which many believe to live there. The elusive Bigfoot! Despite reason and logic, this myth persists along with other, more present and worldly dangers.

Frequently described as an eerily silent place where no birds sing and no furry little creatures scurry about, one tends to constantly glance behind them to see if anything's gaining!

The history of the site is truly bloody and brutal and this is part of its mystique. Tales of murder and revenge are intriguing. One can't help wondering if all the violence is truly "in the past" or if, at any time, the violence might erupt again!

We love mysteries and, while we hope to solve them, sometimes we don't really want them solved. Do we?

Are there evil spirits lurking in that dim silent place? When the photographs we take of the area are developed and show what was not in the scene before, do we shiver? Somehow, it is the photographs which, more than anything else have perpetuated the mystery of Brown's Springs. Do the revealing photographs seek to tell us of events existing in other, hidden realms?

I once stood beside the bubbling spring when, suddenly bursting from the underbrush were several grim and pale faced men on horseback. Running beside them were the most ferocious looking dogs I'd ever seen, and they wore muzzles. To my polite inquiry as to what they were hunting, one stony-faced rider replied in a word; "Hogs," then he and his brethren just seemed to disappear as quickly as they had appeared.

Not exactly a comfortable place to be, Brown Springs. Not too long ago I was told that, living in the lagoon across the road from the springs were alligators! I won't believe that until I see it for myself, even though a trusted source gave me the information. I was also told that a very large python eluded its owner several years ago and resides somewhere in the area. A large python is another thing I wouldn't want to meet in the woods down there.

We love to be scared as long as we can flee to safety if necessary. We keep going back, certain that we'll find something really scary that we can tell everyone about. We know there is nothing supernatural or evil there, but just in case there IS, we keep going back.

As October advances and Halloween draws closer, the Brown's Springs fever rises! The prospect of a walk through the fallen leaves (and tombstones) of the "Old Indian Cemetery" sparks our imagination and our spirit of adventure. But we won't go there.. after sundown!
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"From "Oklahoma Place Names," by George Shirk: ENID. County seat of Garfield County. Post office established August 25, 1893. Although there are a number of versions of the origin of the name, it undoubtedly was taken from Idylls of the King by Tennyson"
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"Hello Butch, Always enjoy your T&T each Friday evening. Looks like your new camera is working out good. Your pictures seem to be much sharper than with the other camera. I can't remember which camera you said you were using now but it seems to get the job done. Much success on your book venture. I'm sure there are many out there who would appreciate what you have if the word gets to them. So sorry to hear about the paramedics, so young! My in-laws came through there about an hour before that accident on their way to Ft. Worth, Texas to visit with us. They said it was really raining when they came through the Arbuckles. We were not even aware of the accident until I read it in your T&T. Our prayers are with their families." -Jerry Summy http://www.Horntown.com
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"Daltons Again. The Gang of Bill Fights United States Marshals - Several Killed - A Bloody Encounter. Arkansas City, Kan., Sept 2, 1893 - A posse of United States marshals and the Dalton gang of bank and train robbers met at Ingalls, Payne county, Oklahoma this morning. Two of the deputy marshals - Speed and Shadley were killed, and a third named Houston was fatally wounded. N. A. Walker, N. D. Murray, G. W. Ranson and a boy named Briggs were wounded, and a young man named Wilson was killed. Officials were informed that the gang was in town and drove out to arrest them and were fired on by the outlaws when they dismounted. The fire was returned and the outlaws started for their horses. Bill Dalton's horse was killed by Shadley and as the horse fell Dalton got on his feet and pumped four shots in rapid succession into the body of Shadley with his Winchester. "Arkansas Tom" was one of the outlaws, who was held at bay in a frame hotel where he took refuge. Messengers were sent to Stillwater for assistance and the sheriff left at once with a posse for the scene. The outlaw finally surrendered. It is thought that he is the man who killed Deputy Marshal Speed and the Simmons boy and wounded Marshal Houston. He is now in the Stillwater jail, guarded by a posse. There were six men in the gang, five of whom escaped, but they are being pursued by a large posse."
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"Cherokee Land Run. Arkansas City, Kan., Sept. 2, 1893 - A careful estimate of the people now on the border in the vicinity of Arkansas City awaiting the opening of the strip, can be placed at 10,000. There are at least 300 people in Arkansas City who are residing in comfortable homes, and some engaged in business in the city, who make the run. Since the issuing of the proclamation, the daily arrivals are large and a number are coming in on the trains who are purchasing ponies and saddles and getting ready for the grand opening. It will be twelve days now until the registering booths are open and ready for business, and unless they come in faster than at the present rate, not over 30,000 or 40,000 people will get their certificates from the Arkansas City booth. It is estimated that more people will enter the strip from this point than any other place on either the north or south lines. Kildare would have probably made the best town in the strip had it been located at Willow Springs and been designated a land office. All Arkansas City people had their eyes on this town, but since its location so far north and the land office given to Perry, the county seat of the county south, Kildare seems to be losing its grip. The people of Oklahoma and especially of Guthrie, will use every means to make Perry a city of 15,000or 20,000 people within the short space of six or eight months, and will no doubt succeed. Pond Creek and Enid will make good towns, but the odds seem to be on Perry. The land office at Perry has already been completed. All sorts of rumors are afloat about the mode of entering. Some claim that Secretary Smith will make all go in afoot. Others that no trains will be allowed to enter and carry passengers; and still others that the trains will enter, but only be allowed to run at a speed of five miles an hour, while a few think that Secretary Smith will rule that all who want claims must enter in a lumber wagon drawn by a span of white horses and driven by a red-headed girl. Notwithstanding all this talk, those who intend winning are purchasing good saddles and horses, feeding dry feed and training the animals to run a good long distance."
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"Check out the sacramento data, up to 250 meteors per hour on the nite of the Nov 19th. Should be worth getting up for." http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2002/09oct_leonidsforecast.htm
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"Joe's IGA was originally on Main street where the Chamber is now. Chuck Keeton had a store on Lake Murray Drive across from the coliseum. Brooks Food Liner was the original store where blockbuster is before selling to JC Luke. RL Williams had a store on Caddo where the electric supply is across from Key feed." -Bob Bell
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"Speaking of teachers at the high school in Ardmore, I had a wonderful English teacher by the name of Lillian Bishop. We had a librarian by the name of Miss Cherry. I think that my History teacher was Muncie Reese; however, I am not sure about that. Does anyone remember? I sat across the aisle from Herbert Mason, and I was attracted to him. This was in 1943-44. It seems that I remember my Biology teacher had the name of 'Faith' as first name or last name. Does anyone remember? She and formaldehyde just seem to go together. My Home economics teacher insisted that we say 'pro te in' rather than the way protein is usually pronounced. I still use her pronunciation; however, I have yet to hear anyone else say it that way. It seems that her name was Elizabeth (?) Those days were so long ago that it seems that my memory has got up and went! Those wonderful days!" -Janice of Copperas Cove, TX
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"Yo Cuz, Just wanted to let you know that I will be in OKC from 1 November through 9 November - coming in for the Bridges mini-reunion over at Furr's Cafeteria in Midwest City. Hope to see you there - want to bring you the bell I promised a few months back." -Ralph Leon Bridges Ford in Korea
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Since I started giving away my History CDs Sept 29, 2001, over 120 of you were lucky enough to win one. Since I will still be giving away the CD with the purchase of my new book, I will not be drawing any more names from the hopper. But look at it this way, by buying a book, you are guaranteed of winning a free CD!

"Quemadmodum gladius neminem occidit, occidentis telum est."
Latin: "A sword never kills anybody; it is a tool in the killer's hand."
-Seneca, Roman philosopher, dramatist, and statesman. 4 BC to AD 65

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 2
Lone Grove, Oklahoma 73443

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Saturday October 12, 2002 T&T Weekly Vol 6 Issue 286

I have been busy compiling the July, August and September 2002 T&Ts into a format that can be made into a book. Many of you have asked if the back issues of T&Ts are available in book form. Many of you have spent a small fortune the past 6 years in paper and printer cartridges printing out T&Ts each week. And many of you mail a printed T&T to a relative or friend who does not have a computer but wants to read the T&T every weekend. And I've had many phone calls and snailmails asking if I mail out the T&Ts in paper form. People have even said they would pay a subscription price to get the T&T in printed form through the mail.

So, here is what I've come up with. Printed in plain vanilla book form, this first book would be almost 150 pages. I think we should go with "plain vanilla" to try and keep the cost as low as possible. There will be no photos in the book, but the photo links like is in each email T&T will be included so the photos can be found on the T&T History CD which I will include with the purchase of the book. I know everyone's question is how much is this book going to cost?

First, I don't want to call it a book. Maybe someday when I retire I will make a book with all the color photos and fancy hardboard covers, etc. What I'm putting together is a "collection" of past T&Ts on paper with softback cover. I've stripped out "non-history" parts and tried to print the meat of the T&Ts... Oklahoma history. This includes the Mailbag in each week's issue and other parts of the T&Ts that pertain to history. The cost will be determined by how many books we have printed. The more printed, the cheaper the cost per book. But I believe we are looking at less than $10 per book (including a History CD) and maybe even $7 or $8 per book. I have the Jul, Apr and Sept of this year's T&Ts ready to go to the printers. What I need now is your thoughts on this. Is there enough Readers who would like to have a paper form of 3 months T&Ts to warrant printing say, 100 copies? Let me hear from you..... it all hinges on what T&T Readers have to say. Just send me email at bridges@OklahomaHistory.net

And anyone can give me a call Toll Free at 1-866-459-8626 and let me know if you like this idea of a book. If you know someone who doesn't have a computer and has been wanting a paper copy of T&Ts, give them the Toll Free number and have them call me. If I get a good positive response, I'll send it to the printers! If not, than we'll just have to wait until we get about 100 orders.

Here is a sample of two pages of text of the proposed 5 1/5 by 8 1/2 book. Actual size is larger than in this photo. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/booksample.jpg

Speaking of OklahomaHistory.net several of you requested a OklahomaHistory.net email address. My offer is still good, so contact me if you would like one. Just tell me what you want the first part to be, i.e. JoeSmith@OklahomaHistory.net or whatever. This is a free email address to the Readers of T&T. My friend Kenneth Eck in Healdton has already requested Kenneth@OklahomaHistory.net so it is taken. There are several others who know have an Oklahomahistory email, so get your request in early if you want one, its free!

And while we are on the subject of OklahomaHistory.net a few of you have even asked about having some kind of MailList or listserver. By this I mean, you send an email to my OklahomaHistory.net MailList Server and it will automatically re-send that email to everyone who requests to be on the MailList. If there are 200 members of a certain Mail Group, then everyone in that mail group will get the same message. Its all done automatically by the listserver. Example: there might be a MailList called AHS1970 or HealdtonAlumni, etc., and everyone who is a member of that list will be able to post and received email from the listserver. One just hast to come up with a catchy group name! Its free, so let me know if anyone wants to form a Mail Group and give it a try!

Thanks to a Reader near the panhandle, that part of the state is almost yellowed in with bell photos. This bell is at the First Baptist Church in Butler, Oklahoma (Custer County). http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/custbap2.jpg

This is the bell in front of the Church of the Nazarene in Vici, Oklahoma (Dewey County). http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/nazdewey.jpg

In the panhandle of Oklahoma at Turpin, Oklahoma (Texas County) at the Methodist Church stands this bell. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/turpin2.jpg

This bell is in Texas County at the United Methodist Church in Baker, Oklahoma. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/bakerok.jpg

This is a bell on a working ranch in Texas County northeast of Beasley, Oklahoma on the Beasley Ranch. It is used today to call in the family at meal time, saves lots of steps! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/beasley2.jpg

This is a second bell on the Beasley Ranch northeast of Beasley, Oklahoma. Mr. Beasley said it has been in his family as long as he could remember and was used by his dad to call the kids from play and the adults in from work to meals. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/beasley3.jpg

This bell is a Ft Supply, Oklahoma in Woodward County at the United Methodist Church. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/ftsupply.jpg

This bell is at the Baptist Church in Ft Supply, Oklahoma. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/ftsupply2.jpg

This bell stands in a park in Hammond, Oklahoma (Roger Mills County) in memory of veterans. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/hammond2.jpg

I've been told there are several bells in Boise City, Oklahoma way out in Cimarron County. One is at the Cimarron Heritage Center, another at Miller's Whispering Winds Gallery, and another bell is located at the Good Shephard Catholic Church in Boise City.

With the addition of the bells above, you can see from the map the panhandle is now covered. But we still need pics of bells in northeast Oklahoma. Let me know if you know of any! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/bellmap.jpg

Electrical workers from Oklahoma City have been busy the past few weeks retrofitting our court house. Many areas of the court house has very old electrical wiring and Osborne Electric out of OKC will be replacing most of it over the next 8 or 9 months. George Soter, an Electrical Engineer from Oklahoma City, started the initial work on the court house's electrical needs, and Osborne Electric will be doing the work. Here is a photo I took of Mr. Soter back in July 2001 when he was looking at some of the old panel boxes in the basement that will be replaced. http://www.Oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/soter2.jpg

Lonnie Davis (front) and Rick Scammahorn (rear) boring a 4 inch hole through the first floor to the basement area underneath the courthouse for electrical conduit http://www.Oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/osborne2.jpg

Electrical box that has just been installed on the first floor http://www.Oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/osborne3.jpg

Much of the conduit that will bring the electricity into the court house, must first come in through the dirt floor basement. This is the basement area under the first floor of the courthouse where new conduit is being run. http://www.Oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/osborne4.jpg http://www.Oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/osborne5.jpg

A couple of weeks ago I mentioned I was revising the Carter County Government's Website. It is pretty much finished now, just a little more to do. But one thing I added I think will be very helpful, is a "How To Find Us" webpage. It's got directions and maps on how to find your way to the court house, the annex building, the sheriffs office, and the county barns. This will help if you are from out of town. Just go to this link and look near the bottom for "How To Find Us". http://www.brightok.net/cartercounty/

Some of you have emailed me saying you tried to pull up photos in old issues of T&Ts using the xoom.com webpage I used long ago. If you are looking for any photos from the xoom.com pages, you should be able to make a correction in the URL, following the example below, and be able to see the pics...... April 1999: "Got another great photo from Ardmore's past sent in by Robert Hensley. It was taken about 1898 at the corner of Caddo and East Main inside the Dew Drop Inn. A great pic!" http://members.xoom.com/_XOOM/OklahomaPast/photos/dewdrop.jpg The above link does not work but it can be changed to..... http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/xoom/dewdrop.jpg which does work.

It's really been a sad week here with the lose of two young Medics with our local ambulance service here in Ardmore. Paramedic Shawn Skelly and critical care medic Shane Gilmore died working an automobile accident in the Arbuckle Mountains last Sunday afternoon. I worked for the ambulance service 14 years and I know it is a very trying time the Service is going through. My heart goes out for everyone at the Southern Oklahoma Ambulance Service. http://www.ardmoreite.com/stories/100702/loc_emts_wreck.shtml# http://www.ardmoreite.com/stories/100802/loc_ambulance.shtml

I called London, England again this week and talked to the people at Ginness World Records. They are the most wonderful people, I loved talking to them. I guess if there was any place in the world I'd like to visit, it would be England. Anyway, I talked to Kate White and she said there was several people from Oklahoma who have set world records and so recorded in the Ginness World Records book. Here is her reply to my inquiry:

"Many thanks for your message. Please find below some details on records which are held by people in Oklahoma. I have put the couple which are in this year's book at the top of the email. I hope this is of help, Kind regards, Kate.

In the 2003 edition

Largest stitched teddy bear- The largest stitched teddy bear measured 11.79 m (38 ft 8.5 in) in length on 21 January 2001 and was constructed by Dana Warren (USA) of Edmond, Oklahoma, USA.

Tallest dinosaur- Dinosaur remains found in 1994 in Oklahoma, USA, belong to what is believed to be the largest creature ever to have walked the Earth. Sauroposeidon ('lizard earthquake god'), was giraffe-like in shape though it was 30 times larger than the largest giraffe. It stood a staggering 18 m (60 ft) tall (the size of a six-storey building) and weighed 60 tonnes (132,300 lb). This lofty dinosaur lived about 110 million years ago, in the Mid-Cretaceous period.

Not in the 2003 edition

Longest straw chain- Crossings Community Church, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA pieced together 24,387 regular-sized drinking straws to form one continuous chain measuring 14,825 ft (2.8078 miles) on 29 April 2001.

Most Golden wedding anniversaries in one family- The greatest number of golden weddings in a family is 11, the three sons and eight daughters of John Lester and Evaline Bradley of Hollis, Oklahoma, USA, all celebrating their golden wedding anniversaries between 1963 and 1997, and the seven sons and four daughters of Clifton E Rutledge and Mary Luella (Moore) Rutledge of Mooreland, Oklahoma, USA, celebrated golden wedding anniversaries between 1972 and 1991.Thomas and Molly Frey of Nebraska, USA had 17 children; 11 of these children celebrated golden anniversaries between the years of 1968 and 1991.

Tallest water tower- The Waterspheroid at Edmond, Oklahoma, USA, built in 1986, rises to a height of 66.5 m. (218 ft.) and has a capacity of 1,893,000 litres (416,000 gal.). The tower was manufactured by Chicago Bridge and Iron Na-Con, Inc.

Youngest published author- At the age of 6, Dennis Vollmer of Grove, Oklahoma, USA, wrote and illustrated Joshua Disobeys and had it published by a commercial publisher, Landmark Editions, Inc. of Kansas City, MO, after his story won a national student writing contest in 1987."

Kate White, GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS
338 Euston Road
London NW1 3BD
(011) 44 207 891 4516
(011) 44 207 891 4536
www.guinnessworldrecords.com

Speaking for world records, I wonder if I should enter this super long gourd I have? It came from east Texas, and might be a world's record at 32 and 1/2 inches long!!! http://www.Oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/gourd2.jpg

I had a request from FL this week concerning Wirt Franklin Oil Company of this county back in the 30s and before. They was wanting to know what company bought out Wirt Franklin Oil?

My neighbors, Daryl and Donna Householder now have a website to tell about their answering service, BridgeMessaging, Inc. If you are in need of an answering service, I recommend them! http://www.bridgemessaging.com/

So far this month, many in our T&T group has been saving money on their long distance calls! http://www.worldxchange.com/agent/228072

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"Butch, I remember seeing the movie "Dillinger" which was shot in Ardmore and Dougherty. It stared Warren Oates and used several area extras. I remember seeing Robert Denney, James Clark, the two Bacon Brothers, Wayne Worthen and Henry the man who shined shoes at the Carter County Court House. There were scenes I recognized was at Dougherty and in Ardmore was Caddo and Main. The Chickasaw Lake Club Clubhouse, The Knox Hotel and so on. While one of the Actors was getting his shoes shined at the Court House, he was sitting under a big sign that said Lake Murray and Colverts Dairy. I had that movie but I have lost it, I don't know what happened to it. But I'd like to see it again."
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"Butch, I can not ever tire of hearing information regarding Washington School. Those were the happiest years of my carefree life. I do remember clearly Miss Ringer and her pictures placed around the room at the blackboards. On Fridays, if it was our day to have art instead of music, Miss Ringer would spend the entire class period telling us the history of the artist and the circumstances of why the particular painting was made. I was literally terrified of Miss Ringer, and only had her for art during the upper elementary school years. I was very poor in art, but out of those years I was able to do two things which she praised to high heaven. One was I was called on to go up the blackboard and take the pointer and name each one of the paintings as well as its painter. I did every painting correctly without even pausing to think. Miss Ringer was so proud of me. Another time, she let us to finger painting with different color paste or some kine of potion she mixed up (remember the sink in the back of her room). My color was green, and near the end of the class she told us to paint a picture for her that would good enough to be posted in her classroom. Well, I could't draw worth a flip, so I quickly thought up the idea to draw a musical staff with a treble cleft, and a couple of sharps or flats as well as a time signature. Miss Ringer was so proud of me, and I actually did a good job that my painting made the group to be hung with the selected ones. She said it was so original as no one else had that idea. I always did better in music with Mrs. Wilna Lasiter, and she was also my 5th grade homeroom teacher. She was a great teacher, and she was not as rough as I feared Miss Ringer might be, and literally could be. Many people have inquired about Mrs. Lasiter and they would say Wilma Lasiter, but her first name was Wilna. At one time she directed the choir at The Calvary Presbyterian Church, and I think she played the piano for a local church. She was a very talented lady and was a very sweet woman. At the end of the school year, she put on the play about the great American composer, George M. Cohen. We practiced all semester on those wonderful patriotic songs. I will never forget that program that the fifth and sixth grade did in May of 1956. I am sure that many of Washington School former students will also remember those extremely nice Christmas treats that the PTA gave each student. I remember Mrs. Gentry very well. Also, Mrs. Smithers who made such lovely chocolate cake on soup day each Wednesday. I would give ten dollars for a piece of cake that taste just exactly like that did. I have never had any just like it flavor wise, and I have even tried to make it myself. I have often wondered if Mrs. Smither would give us the receipe for this cake. I know the school received commodities in those days, therefore real butter was used in our food, and we always had that delicious cheese. In those days, there was no such items as pizza, pigs in a blanket, or chili con carne on our menus at school."
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"Butch, I am attaching a little dittie that I wrote on Sept 11th last. By coincidence, my oldest son, Don Jr, called me a couple of weeks later and out of the blue said he just wanted to tell me he loved me and to thank me for raising him and providing for him all those childhood years. What a shock! A pleasant one, though, and I thought that your readers in T&T might be happy to hear that a son was so thoughtful. -Don Bridges (Sr, or course) http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/textfiles/memoriesdb.jpg
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"Hi Butch, Just read this week's T&T, interesting as usual. Good job! Don't know if anyone else learned the poem about the days of the month like I did or not but when I was in school, this is the way it went."
Thirty days has September, April, June and November
All the rest have thirty-one, except February alone
Which hath but twenty-eight, in fine,
Till Leap Year gives it twenty-nine.
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"Hi Butch, great work on the site. Love all the history and emails from everyone. As to the Rascals, my aunt Jerry Spurlock Almon, was wither in the movie or tried out for it, can't remember which. You might know her, she was the City Manager's secretary for years. They had an article in The Ardmoreite in the last couple of years on her and The Rascals, I think. Keep up the good work." Karla
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"In your column, you mentioned a girl that won a part in the Little Rascals Movie. I believe that is Jerry Almon from here in Ardmore. I have seen a newspaper clipping she has about the movie and how she was picked. You might contact her. Also, thought I would tell you that one resident out at the Magnetic Hill said that when it rains the water runs backwards UP the hill. Enjoy your column very much. Save every one."
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"Just read "THE MAILWASHER FAN" letter and only can hope they sent a small pittance of a donation to these fine folks down under in Christ Church, New Zealand. The download IS free but the support is not so if you will need ongoing updates I would suggest that anyone using this program make a donation to it's programmers "Nick Bolton" and the "MAILWASHER TEAM". I have been using the program (Beta Version) for several months now and have had no difficulty with it as the coding has been written quite well. You can sign me Satisfied in Shreveport, La." leehhiltoniii@sport.rr.com
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Butch, here is a picture of the first and second grade at Wheeler School, northeast of Healdton, where I started to school. It was taken in the spring of 1943 on the front steps of the Wheeler School building. Teacher was Mary Steele Beaty. Mrs. Beaty's father was the principal. I do not recall his first name. Names were not on the picture, but with some help I have been able to identify many of them. If anyone can help with identities, contact me at suzee54@brightok.net http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/wheel43.jpg
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"Butch, I have been reading a book entitled "Selden Lindsey, U.S. Marshall". He was from Carter Co OK but lived in close neighboring counties at one time, according to the book which was written by his grandson whose last night is (was) McCullough. I will send you more details after I re-locate the book and scan through it. Anyway, Marshall Lindsey was the person who brought the body of the outlaw, Bill Dalton, to Ardmore OK after Dalton was shot and killed at a place named Elk (?Elk City). Lindsey led a posse to the home of some people by the last name of Wallace, who were giving Dalton and some of his men a place to stay. This was right after a bank in Texas (I believe). Another posse led by a different U.S. Marshall was also in the area. According to the notes by Marshall Lindsey, from which this grandson got his notes, along with a set of notes given by an accompanying posse member Loss Hart, one of Dalton's gang members saw one of the posse members and warned Dalton who came out shooting. Lindsey opened fire and Dalton was shot in the middle of his left chest. Hart who was in a barn, also shot as Dalton was going down and got him in the right side. The body was loaded up in a wagon and driven back to Ardmore. It was a hot day and the body swelled up pretty bad, even though Lindsey stopped on occasion and poured water over it from springs or wells. Apparently, Loss Hart was always given credit for killing him. He did shoot him, but it was not the fatal shot. Neither Lindsey or Hart ever asked for the reward money, which had been about $20,000 - unheard of for that time. I'll write more details when I have time to reread some of the book. Dalton's widow came to pick up her husband's body and stayed in one of the hotels in downtown Ardmore. It was believed that Dalton was trying to amass money and supplies so that he, his wife and their children could escape to Mexico and live there. I just thought this was interesting and adds to our "frontier" era in Indian/Oklahoma Territory. There is another book about a U.S. Marshall who served in Ardmore...it's called "Gunman's Territory" and is about Marshall Bob Hutchins. These really bring the "old west" to life and I'm glad I came across these at the public library."
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"I have so many memories of all the trips I made to Devils Den over a 40 year time frame, and would like to talk or email with the present owner. My email is lh49ddok@attbi.com
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"I do remember having fun at Washington School in Miss Ringer's art classes a great number of us kids "renamed" the various paintings she had us learn. Blue Boy became "Pinkie" and The Gleaners became "Picking Up Sticks." Those were happy days. I had intended to mention that the last time I wrote but forgot to do so."
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"Hi Butch: Metta and I joined a very large group in Oklahoma City Saturday afternoon to celebrate the 80th birthday of Helen Flannagan. While there we met a pretty friend of yours who works at the Ardmore County Court house. Her name is Dixie Harper."
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"I have so many memories of all the trips I made to Devils Den over a 40 year time frame, and would like to talk or email with the present owner. My email is lh49ddok@attbi.com
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"Butch, did you tell me you had an old map in your possession of the ferry sites along Red River? If so, could you forward me a copy of it." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/lovemap.jpg
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"Well I thought that your Brown Springs album was really interesting. I live in Thackerville, several of my friends have been to the springs and we have seen many things that cant be explained. Such as little black creatures flying in and out between the trees when really no one is there. We have heard voices and seen nothing. Many things happen there. All of which we have heard and seen at night. I think that some sort of spirit still stays there to watch over the cemetary. It is a proven fact that many bodies have been found there. Several cults have meetings there and crucify bodies. I myself have heard things that make me want to run and never look back. Many times i have been lost and cant find my path when i know it by heart, or thats what we all think until we are there and cant find our way out. We would love to go with you sometime on one of your trips. Many of my friends and i read and look at your web site every day at school. We know what you mean because we have been there and seen things things that cant be explained."
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"After having read several things from your Brown Springs web page, i decided to examine this myself. Some of my pupils and i went to the cemetary to further explore the springs. When doing so we found that things happen when it is dark that not even the human eye can explain. I had taken my video camera to hopefully catch some things on tape.While following the path we had come across a copperhead, being afraid that it would bite us we killed it, or my friend wilderness man (Joshbgosh) had smashed its head in. It seemed as if the snake was the gate keeper for the headstone. After killing the snake a headstone fell over by itself, no one had touched it. The indians believe that if an owl crosses your path someone close to you is going to die. While walking further down the path we came upon a white owl sitting in a tree. We shined our light so we could get a better look and when we did the owl flew away not making a sound all of which we have on tape. At this point things began to get very strange. Our light had gone dead and we couldnt see. Trying to find our way out it seemed as if we were going in circles. After a period of running around in the dark we managed to find the fence that led to the way out. As we were walking down the path we heard voices of little girls screaming like they were being hurt. We began to run to our vehicles in panic afraid that they wouldnt be there. As we got to the bottom of the hill we got in our vehicles and left and havent been back since then."
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"Hi Butch, my name is Dennis Teegardin, in 1965, I dated Jim Ozment's daughter Mae Lynn Ozment, I have tried to find out where she might be, and how she is doing, but have had no success. She was a student nurse at St Joseph's school of nursing, in Ok City at the time, and I was in the Air Force. Funny how things work out, in later years, I became a fire chief!! (Her dad Jim Ozment was an Ardmore Fire Chief.) I'll always remember what nice people her family were, Jim, his wife, and her brother frank. Any clues as to her whereabouts, or what she's done with her life." capt52@mindspring.com http://mrmusic20.tripod.com/mrmusicsmp3oldies/id1.html
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"Thought you might like to see these. Wreaths on the ambulances" http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/soas10a.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/soas10b.jpg
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"Hi Butch, Just wanted to remind folks that Saturday, Oct. 19th from 2pm 'til 6pm there is a FREE concert in Medicine Park, Oklahoma (5 miles north of Lawton). The Reeves Brothers are playing on the Island. Bring your lawn chairs and relax on the lawn under the beautiful Katalpa trees. At the same time the Volunteer Fire Dept. is serving a Bean and Brisket dinner for donations. This event is a family affair and free of alcohol. The shops are staying open late for those of you who really want to make a day of it! Come enjoy our concert and take in the sights this historical town has to offer! Butch, come on up and join us! Thanks for T&T! --Joy at "The Purple Parrot Art Gallery & Such" In Beautiful Medicine Park, Oklahoma."
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"The local former child actor of Little Rascals fame to whom you referred in your Oct. 5 edition is a woman named June Thompson. She should be in her mid-ups about now. Her phone number seems to be unlisted. I couldn't find the number for her daughter and son-in-law, Bob and Elizabeth Lucas, either, though they are probably still here, too. Her son's name is Joe Lacy; he tried to resurrect the old Haney Grocery Store in Gene Autry a few years ago. Before retiring from show business June was quite the jazz singer for many big bands."
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"I must say I wish my folks were here to read your column, it is well worth it. And thanks for trying to help me to figure out about my grandfather. Do you know any of these people? Trilla Hamms, Rebecca Williams, Arthur John, Opal McSwegon, Raymond Johnson, Evla Mae Cuirrull, Miss Ethel McClure, Cordelia Fraser, Eva Lee Cason, Mrs. Lincille Griffin, Gladys McClure, J. L. Stegar, Mildred Nickles, Eva Beasley, Viola Turnbow, James R. Strouge, Anna E. Rinnie, Harold Michael, J.L. Le argile?, Mike Shelton, Sam Swanson, Mary arit Ritter?, Mary H. Boudway, Ruth Milburn, Dorthy Marcum, and Ernestino Royster, I'm not sure if these names are to an old picture that my mother had. Perhaps some of your readers may know, and could let me know." -Vera Jones kamieljones@webtv.net
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"I have a request for my 96 year old Great-Aunt. She says that three doctors left Equity, then Kincaid, KANSAS about the time of the land rush into the CHEROKEE STRIP. One wrote back to Kincaid that they had named the city of Enid after her sister, Enid ROUTZONG. Does anyone have information on the naming of Enid, OK? My G-Aunt is a collector of trivia (lists and lists) and has been wondering about this for years. She is very lonely and would just be thrilled by this information. Also a list of early doctors into Enid would be great. Many thanks." -Rita Wood, Kansas rwood@lvnworth.com
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"The AHS Class of 1967 is having a Cookout/Picnic/Gab Fest! October 26th, 4-10pm, (or however long you can stand!!) Martin's Landing Pavilion, east side of Lake Murray. It's almost time!! One week from tomorrow!! Reservation for the pavilion is made, firewood is gathered, weather is crisp, and we are ready for the First Annual AHS Class of 1967 Cookout!! All AHS alumni, (any year), other schools alumni, family, friends, any interested (and interesting) people are invited. We furnish the pavilion, campfire & charcoal grills (lit), you furnish food & drinks for you and your guests. There is a dock if anyone is interested in fishing, if you want to bring a boat (with lifejackets), great, oldies music would be nice...whatever you want. Looks like a good time for all, and you can't complain about the PRICE!!! Please try to make this, you WILL have a good time, if you didn't make the reunion, don't worry...they all look just as old as you do!! Name tags (with LARGE print) will be provided, bring any old pictures, yearbooks, memories & come for a great evening, stay as long (or as short) as you like, but COME!! See you there!" -Nancy Wages Chadwell 580-223-4583 crenan@swbell.net
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I knew the economy was bad and all from watching the newscasts. Layoffs, furloughs, 401Ks now 201Ks, etc. But it really hit home this week when I went to buy more of that Cranmore Honey we talked about last December. It's made over in Coleman, Oklahoma (north of Durant). Last month 4 pounds of Cranmore Honey cost %6.29 and it came in a glass jar. Now it comes in a plastic container, and it will cost you around $6.17 for 2 pounds 10 ounces. Ouch! That's almost double! Guess I'l be using plain sugar in my hot tea this winter. Here's that glass jar of honey we talked about last December. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/cranhon2.jpg

Here are two more winners for a free "History CD" this week! Over 4,100 files totaling over 410mgs! And here are those two winners for this week!
schahara@sprynet.com
tommiej@fuse.net

"History is a relentless master. It has no present, only the past rushing into the future. To try to hold fast is to be swept aside." -John Fitzgerald Kennedy

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 2
Lone Grove, Oklahoma 73443

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Saturday October 5, 2002 T&T Weekly Vol 6 Issue 285

A Reader reminded me last week about a movie made locally here sometime between 1945 and 1949. The movie was based after the TV show "The Little Rascals" but the cast being made up of all local residents. She said the Ritz Theater (117 West Main) would show this movie on a regular basis during those years. I know of one Ardmoreite who "starred" in the movie, but I was told she didn't know where a copy of the movie was either. Maybe someone will remember this homespun movie will be remembered by someone out there, and some of the actors in it.

Speaking of the Little Rascals, there was one Ardmoreite who acted in that national film syndication. I can not think of her name right now, but her son lives in the Gene Autry area. Maybe someone will remember her name.

Another Reader told me this week about a bubbling spring that in the 40s was behind a house in my stomping grounds on 3rd NE. I told about the spring that used to be behind my grandfather Carmon's lumber yard. But I don't remember the spring that was behind Annie Grider's house in the southwest corner of 3rd and M Street Northeast. The Reader said it bubbled up out of the ground a few hundred feet south-southwest of Annie Grider's home. This would have been out in the wooded area northwest of Cardinal Ball Park.

Last week we talked about the "wild woman" Ethel Hindman of the Arbuckle Mountains. I had heard that Ethel Hindman moved on to California to be a stunt woman, but didn't know what ever happened to her out there. A Reader answered that question in the Mailbag below. She died as she lived, always looking for that next rush.

On September 7th we talked about Magnetic Hill near Springer, Oklahoma. I've heard from several of you, telling me you went out there and check out this mystery. A Reader told me about one office here in town taking their entire staff out there, including a couple of engineers to examine this stretch of Pitt Road where your car seems to roll up hill. She said while they were out there, this one area farmer drove by 3 or 4 times trying to figure out what in the world was going on. I predict teachers will be taking students out to Magnetic Hill as an experimental outing! Here are those photos I took a month ago including a map how to get to Magnetic Hill NW of Springer. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/maghill2.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/maghill3.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/maghill4.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/magmap.jpg

Last Saturday, September 29th, was pickup day for us who participate in the Share Program. Once a month about 70 people from all around this area pickup our groceries behind St Mary's Catholic Church here in Ardmore. I took my camera last Saturday and snapped some photos of the truck being unloaded with the goodies. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/share9a.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/share9b.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/share9c.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/share9d.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/share9d.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/share9f.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/share9g.jpg

To learn more about the Heartland Share program call Carole Ellis at 580-223-5287 or check out their website at

My bell expert in St Louis, Missouri looked at the bell photos that were in last weekend's T&T and made some interesting comments:

shawneeb.jpg - "This was sold as an alarm bell (fire bell), as indicated by the shape of the yoke, which probably carries the name of The C.S.Bell Co. You can see that the crossbar of the right-hand upright has a pulley on the underside; the left-hand upright will look just the same (though in this picture it's too shadowed). Alarm bells like this had two ropes tied to the clapper; one went over each pulley. This arrangement made it possible to yank the clapper back and forth very quickly, producing a very agitated sound, very different from that of a swinging bell, and very appropriate for use as a fire alarm." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/shawneeb.jpg

cabrini2.jpg - "iron, style of C.S.Bell" http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/cabrini2.jpg

forgan.jpg - "iron, style of C.S.Bell, but different from the Cabrini bell. Notice the wheel, where the spokes are C-shaped instead of straight. Also, the yoke doesn't fit as closely to the bell in this case." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/forgan.jpg

maycog.jpg - "iron, style of C.S.Bell" http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/maycog.jpg

laverne3.jpg - "interesting tower! I doubt the bell is brass; maybe iron painted brass color." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/laverne2.jpg http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/laverne3.jpg

gfriends.jpg - "iron, probably a very early C.S.Bell Co. product. Notice the little curlicues at the elbows of the yoke and on each side of the mounting bolt at the center of the yoke; I think those were originally intended as reinforcements rather than decorations." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/gfriends.jpg

gateumc.jpg - no comment! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellphotos/gateumc.jpg

"Good work! Now if you could just persuade your correspondents to tell you more about the inscriptions on the bells or their fittings..." -Carl Zimmerman, St Lous, MO

I had the pleasure of meeting Ardmoreite Marvin Lewis this week. He is a local artist and travels around the country to Indian Pow Wows. Marvin sells his paintings as he travels and meets people. After talking to him a few minutes, I could tell we both had one thing in common, the love of history! You can email Marvin at redeagle@arbuckleonline.com Marvin was reluctant, ain't we all, hahaha, to send me his photo, but he finally did. Here's a pic of local artist Marvin Lewis. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/marvinlewis.jpg And here is a pic one of Marvin's paintings. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/lewism9.jpg

I know a lot of us do much of our communicating through emails. But sometimes its really nice to just get a good old fashioned phone call with a voice on the other end. That happened to me this week when local long time Carter county resident Jimy Brady Rose gave me a call. She just wanted to say hello and tell about the delightful snailmails she had received from all over the country (she does not have a computer) concerning our T&T and mentions of her. Some of her friends who knew Jimy did not have a computer, printed out the T&Ts and mailed them to her. I could have picked her wealth of local historical knowledge but decided we'd be on the phone for hours. I did ask Jimy about the history of the bell that was out on their ranch north of Ardmore that we spoke about in the last issue. She said her grandparents brought the bell with them from Texas in 1892 when they came to Indian Territory and settled near Pooleville. So it has been in her family for over 100 years. Here's a pic I took of that bell in case some of you missed it! http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/brady9a.jpg

A GLIMPSE INTO THE PAST....

BODY OF AERONAUT KILLED AT PAULS VALLEY BURIED AT SHERMAN

The Daily Ardmoreite
Ardmore, Oklahoma
Tuesday, September 19, 1917

Mr and Mrs R.C. Adams of Legate, uncle and aunt of Miss Beulah Crabtree, who was killed at Pauls Valley last week, when she fell from a parachute, passed through Ardmore yesterday en route to Sherman, Texas where the body was taken for burial. Miss Crabtree is said to have lost her hold on the parachute and fallen 200 feet after she had made a balloon ascension at a carnival being held at Pauls Valley. She was considered one of the best aeronauts in this country. She was related to John T. Spears and V.C. Adams of Ardmore.

I have the capability to set up personal emails using oklahomahistory.net for anyone wishing one. Examples: jones@oklahomahistory.net or Madill@oklahomahistory.net or Choctaw@oklahomahistory.net etc. When someone sends you email at this secondary email address, it will be instantly forwarded to your present primary email address on record. I have bridges@oklahomahistory.net set up for me. If anyone sends me email at that address, it automatically goes to my primary email address of bridges@brightok.net . If anyone wants a free oklahomahistory.net email addy, just let me know.

Last week in the Mailbag a Reader told about a relative possibly being in the McGinnis Book Of World Records. This Ardmoreite's name was William McDougal and the record was suppose to have been set around 1925. I called the McGinnis World Record office in London, England yesterday and asked them to check their database for such a person. Come to find out "the book" did not exist before 1953, so Mr. McDougal of Ardmore may have set some kind of record but it would not be in the McGinnis World Book of Records. But I did enjoy talking to those Britons and thought how my ancestors were burned at the stake back in 1588 at near Norwich, England for heresy. They finally left England in 1633 under persecution for practicing their Puritan faith. Who knows, I may have been talking to some long distance cousins yesterday! There was one part of the conversation that I didn't understand immediately when he said "McDougal was not in the boot". Several times I thought he used the word "boot" and that is what the English call the trunk of their automobiles. But after a minute or two, I figured out he was saying "book". hahaha. And then when I mention something about their accent in England, they tell me it is me who has the accent. hahaha. Talk about an accent, I've been told the Cockney dialect in the London area and on south, is almost impossible to understand them! By the way, using WorldxChange only cost 7 cents a minute, so my 10 minute conversation to London totaled 70 cents! Well worth the call!! Our T&T group talked 13,500 minutes for September. Low Rates. Crystal clear calls. No switching! http://www.worldxchange.com/agent/228072

SOME LETTERS FROM THIS WEEK'S MAILBAG

"I too went to Washington Elementary and remember those teachers. Mrs.Dawson was my first grade teacher, Mrs. Sherman, 2nd grade, Mrs. Cox, 3rd grade, Mrs. Arrington, 4th grade, Miss Ringer, 5th grade and Mrs. Thompson, 6th grade. I also remember going to Moran Grocery store and getting those "lucky" suckers. I also enjoyed the Mom and Pop Grocery Stores you mentioned. The Pittman's were my great aunt and uncle, and I knew Mrs. Abe (Pearl) Carmon (1117 4th NE) that lived next door to them. Thanks for letting me relive some great memories."
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"In reference to the letter from Beth Gunn, Arlington, TX Can anyone tell me the full name and more about the principal Mr. Cisco at Franklin grade school? Some of the Cisco family from Kentucky to Ardmore are my family." -Bud Caudle BnLFAMILY@aol.com
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"When the workers finish archiving the records at the courthouse, there will be copies left at the courthouse wont there? I mean, we won't have to go to Utah to preview them will we? The last time I was at the courthouse and opened one of the marriage books a piece of paper fell out. I looked at the book and realized then that they were being used way to much and that they had little life left in them at the rate they were going. In the 3 year span that I had been there, genealogy had become very popular and the books were being used more and more. I had the feeling and I voiced them to you that we should not be using the actual books anymore, that they should be scanned or microfilmed or something. I am so thrilled that this is being done. yet it's kind of sad to know that these books will go into an archive and we will no longer have access to them. But it's that access that is destroying them. I can't wait to go through the new microfilms. are they going to index them? That would be the cats meow!"
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"Hi Butch, Thanks for your efforts..You have gouged the memories of many, including myself..Lily Chandler taught me in the fifth grade at Franklin School (Prin. Johnny Newcomer)..I remember her sharp car..A '39 Chevy Coupe..Someone asked if anyone remembered Mr. Stamper..I remember Bill Stamper taught Vets Agri..Vera Jones wrote about Irene McDougal and I would like to know what happened to Judith Ann Jones..I would like Vera to E-mail me..The poem: Sniper Not Guilty, might shed a little light on Irene. Butch have you ever seen Les Gilliam perform? He is a walking history library, very interesting and talented..He's tops in my book.. Happy Trails." -Bud budroller31@hotmail.com
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"Saw your wild woman article. I know of a daredevil woman who lived in the caves there with her hermit Dad. Don't know her name though, just the story. She jumped off old biplanes into lakes for shows. She was friends with my GrAunt Willie Roberts Bobo. Willie rode Bulls. The woman went out to California and was doing shows there. She jumped off a plane and misjudged, hit the dock there and died. Just one of those stories that has been passed down."
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"Butch, this picture is the sixth grade graduation at Healdton Sunset Elementary School in 1948. Teachers of the two sixth grade classes were Mary Barker and Mary Frost. Several of us have gotten out heads together and identified all but three of the students in this picture. This class graduated from high school in 1954 and a 50th anniversary reunion already is being planned for June 2004. We are trying to locate as many of our classmates as possible --- not just those who graduated from Healdton, but all who attended school with us through the years. A group of us has been working on this for several months and have had some success, but many are still "missing." Anyone with information on this group may e-mail me at suzee54@brightok.net Thanks for you help." -Sue Hess Miller http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/heald48b.jpg
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"Butch, in your T&T 9/28, someone wrote about some more of the Washington School teachers who were there in the 50's and 60's. I definitely remember them. Mary Ringer was a 5th grade teacher, who also taught art. She was a small red-haired lady who was extremely strict so even for one so small, she always had full control of her classes. Mrs. Zumwalt taught music (was also a 5th grade teacher). We switched classes in order to have both art and music. Mr. Stamper was teaching 6th grade when I was in that grade but seems to me that,before that, he taught 4th grade right next to Juanita Arrington's 4th grade classroom and during that time Griffin Biles taught 6th grade. Later, it seems, that Mr. Stamper moved up to 6th grade when Mr. Biles left. Some of this is fuzzy in my memory so this might not be completely right. Back to Mrs. Ringer. Her room was covered in famous paintings such as Blue Boy, Pinkie (I think that's what it was called), The Gleaners and many more. Each day she would touch every one of them and we had to tell her the names of the paintings and the artist's name. Teachers in Ardmore Jr High always knew if you were a "Washington Sc. Kid" because those students knew the names of all of these paintings. There were probably 15 or 20 of them, maybe more. Each day she would ask her students questions (the same ones) at the beginning of the day such as "Did you brush your pearls (your teeth)?; wash behind your ears? and a few others I can't remember. I remember Mrs. Carson who taught 2nd grade but had Mrs. Sherman for a teacher. Students from those days were well behaved and had respect for their school, teachers and classmates. We had very few discipline problems because the teaching staff was allowed to take care of problems early and nip them "in the bud", and the parents were very supportive of those teachers. Mr. George Connely (?SP) was principal when I was at Washington and he always had a big smile on his face. He was usually on the playground during recess, especially when 4th, 5th and 6th grade was having theirs in the little park west of the school. We had swings, merry-go-round, monkey bars and teeter-totters. I fell off those monkey bars one day, all the way from the top and I think I hit every bar on the way down. That's probably what's wrong with me now. Haha. He and the teachers would sit on the rock benches in the park, drink their coffee and watch us play. Jump rope was a big favorite pastime of ours, as well as kick ball. I don't remember any of the students from that time being so caught up in "going together" like they are now days. We were all just friends. One other person I remember was the custodian when I was in the 4th - 6th grades...a Mr. Watson. He had a daughter named Sharon. Sharon had the most beautiful black curly hair and was somewhat taller than most of the other girls. I always envied her both. She was a little learning disabled but that didn't matter to any of us. We were very patient when she read out loud, it just took her a little longer. Mrs. Rose Solomon had started her spec. ed. classes by that time, but seems like all of her students were Downs Syndrome children, so Sharon didn't go to any special classes that I can remember. However, she was able to learn just fine, only at a slower pace. Mrs. Gentry was one of the lunch room cooks and boy could she ever cook! She had the best beans, stew, cornbread, pea salad and cobblers than any cook around. She always gave you seconds if you asked for them. No one left her lunch room hungry. We were given plenty of time to eat and I don't recall any one ever bringing their lunch. My sister was married to one of her sons (John Lee), so I got many "second helpings" at her house when we visited. So many things have changed since then, many for the good, but there are a number of things I would change back like they were "way back then" if I could. By the way, Shirley Higginbotham Keeton, who was one of my former classmates, passed away this year. She was only 54. She was Carnival Queen in 6th grade. I remember the dress she wore, a red satin, semi-formal with T-length. The newspaper sent out a photographer and took her picture. Can't remember who was king. Too bad we didn't have school pictures during those times. You didn't get one taken in Ardmore Schools until you got into high school and that was because they had a yearbook. 8th grade and down didn't. Rural schools took them for every grade. Thanks, Butch, for triggering my long-buried memories."
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"Butch, I just got this and thought you might like to have it. You probably have it but I don't recall seeing it in the newsletter. The Officer Down Memorial Page at http://odmp.org was created in January 1996. Since then, it has taken on a life of its own. The Web site was intended to honor fallen law enforcement officers from the United States in 1996 alone. Chris Cosgriff, a freshman at James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Va. introduced the concept."
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"Hi Butch Bridges I just wanted to let you know that I'm using MailWasher, a program designed to keep out unsolicited commercial email (otherwise known as spam) and email viruses from your computer, so I've just got it to write you a quick email message. It also allows you to preview and delete emails before you download them, like emails with large attachments or viruses. So you never have to download bad emails again. Plus a really handy feature allows you to bounce emails back to people so it looks like your address doesn't exist. So if you're getting a lot of unsolicited email or you gave your email address to the wrong person you can now bounce it back to them so they can take your name off their list. Here's a neat program to view your E-mail on your ISP's server before downloading it to your computer. You can manipulate it by deleting E-mail messages from YOUR server before you expose your system to a download virus or damaging Trojan payload. It's free and easy to download and use, so do it now! Just click on the link." http://www.mailwasher.net/download/
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"Hi Butch, went to Guthrie Ok, and Coalgate Ok last week, here the pictures of the towns I took while there." http://www.worldisround.com/articles/12459/index.html http://www.worldisround.com/articles/12429/index.html http://www.worldisround.com/articles/12422/index.html
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"I don't know how many of your readers are out of state and unable to visit the OKC memorial. I shot some photos of the memorial last week and added them to my site where I had some photos from the one year anniversary. If you would like to share this memorial with your readers, the address is: http://www.jrmints.com/photography/okc_mem_2002.html
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"Well, you certainly opened my eyes to some new information about my Dad - had no idea that he used to help walk cattle through Ardmore - see what you can learn about your family just by reading your T&T."
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"The "Front Porch Bunch" of Ardmore, spearheaded by Brenda Wood, was written up in the October Guidepost magazine. F. Earl Jenkins, also of Ardmore, sent the article in. It is a great thing that the volunteers from Brenda's church are doing. They give their time and efforts to help people. Thanks again for the T&T Butch. We enjoy it every time."
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"I happened upon your site and thought you might be able to help me. I'm looking for old photos or picture postcards of Marietta, OK and/or Love County. Do you know of a resource?" jim@mcanally.info
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"We've got his picture, but we don't know who he is. At the signing of the Social Security Act on August 14, 1935, there were a number of dignitaries on hand who were photographed with President Franklin D. Roosevelt. During the years, we have been able to identify all those in the photographs with the exception of one mysterious person -- the one we call "Bowtie Man." We think he was a member of Congress and was probably a member of one of the two committees with jurisdiction over Social Security legislation in 1935. There are five members of Congress who might have been present, and one of them might be our man. Can you identify Bowtie Man or rule out any of our five candidates? To provide clues or solve the mystery, visit Bowtie Man's very own website. Watson, the game is afoot!" http://www.ssa.gov/history/bowtieman.html
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"Little known fact in Ardmore, my marriage to Mary Jean Sprekelmeyer on June 28th 1952 was the first Nuptial Mass performed in the new St Mary's church. The celebrant was Father Alexander Andrews and the alter boy was a young Bernard Jewitt, the son of Father Andrews sister Kitty Jewitt. He is and has been a priest in Oklahoma City for quite a few years. John Sprekelmeyer, my deceased wife's Uncle was a heating and air conditioning contractor in Fort Worth, he air conditioned the first office building in Texas. At the time St Mary's was being built in the Spring of 1952 John offered to put in the heating and air conditioning units at no cost to the parish, but as I understand it, the church board turned him down. I find this story incredible. But the family say's its true."
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"Greetings, I am doing some research on the life and architecture of Solomon Andrew Layton, who as you probably know was the architect of the Oklahoma State Capitol. I found your courthouse pictures on the internet, and would like to thank you for taking them. Many of these courthouses I had not seen before. Layton also designed about 15 county courthouses, so it is great to find pictures of them. If you are interested in Laytons' work or have stumbled onto other examples, let me know." Bret.A.Carter@conoco.com
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"Dear Butch, My Grandfather W. H. Ivie also called "Bud" was a traveling Veterinarian around Carter, Garvin, Stephens, and other counties. I recently talked with his late brother's 99 year old wife and his 70 something daughter in Wilson and they said my Grandfather died at their home in wilson about 1941 or 1942. They said he is buried in Love county. After this long lead in I wanted to know if there might be death records in Carter county or should I write the state? I plan on traveling out there in the next month or two to visit those ladies before it's too late. Thanks for all you do!" -Wade Durham (Grew up in Sulphur 1944 model) http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/ok/carter/cartercm.htm http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/ok/love/lovecem.htm
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"The First Presbyterian Church at Ardmore in 1927." http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/1stpres.jpg
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"Hi Butch. You would not believe what I have been watching tonight.... Okie Noodling !!!! Unbelievable... If I had not heard of it from you, I would have not even have battered an eyelash !!! Oh my them men rooting in holes to catch them fish...Something else."
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Wilson Monuments in Lone Grove informed me this week the new Airbase Memorial stone now has the names of those who died at the airbase during training 50 years ago finished. The next step is to get it set at the airpark. I took a pic of the finished Autumn Rose granite from Mill Creek, Oklahoma, but the sun was at the wrong angle, so it was not a good pic. I'll get another pic next time I'm at Lone Grove. Also this marker look small in the photo, but is much larger in real life, it weighs over 2,000 pounds! Anyway here is that poor quality photo I took. http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos/airmem2.jpg

Here are two more winners for a free "History CD" this week! Over 4,100 files totaling over 410mgs! If you have not entered the drawing for a free CD, and want in, just send me an email! Here is a pic of those history CDs. http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/ttphotos/t&tcd.jpg

And here are those two winners for this week! brasherjaniece@ce.com
tbear@air-internet.net

"30 days has September,
April, June and November,
All the rest have 31,
Except February has 28."

See everyone next Saturday!

Butch Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 2
Lone Grove, Oklahoma 73443

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