This and That Newsletter

www.OklahomaHistory.net

Vol 21  Issue 1048     Circulation 5,000      February 23, 2017

Ardmore, Oklahoma

My permanent email address:  butchbridges@oklahomahistory.net

580-490-6823


#15-21 North Washington, Ardmore, Oklahoma. Hotel Wisnor/Carter-Booker Bldg. The 50 room, 3 story, Hotel Wisnor was named in honor of Benjamin Wisnor Carter, prominent Chickasaw Indian for whose family Carter County was named. Built in 1884 ($17,000) it was the first and finest establishment of its kind in Indian Territory. It was destroyed by fire in 1899.  In 1903 the Carter-Booker Building was erected at this location and provided offices for the Cotton Exchange as well as independent cotton buyers. Extensive renovation adhered as closely as possible to the original appearance. Eight luxury apartments occupy the second floor with retail on street level. On the left is the U.S. Court House. Both were located south of the present day Hamburger Inn.

HOTEL WISNOR DESTROYED - July 13, 1899
About 3:30 o'clock this morning our people were aroused by the shooting of fire arms, Ardmore's fire alarm. Those at a distance were some time in locating the fire and hopes were brightening that wherever it was it had been subdued. Presently an ominous flash appeared, then all was dark again. So sudden was this that eye witnesses at a distance could not locate it. They had not long to wait, however, when a blaze shot heavenward through the roof of the Wisnor hotel. In the meantime Ardmore's fire fighters were on the scene and the battle began. No one knows how the fire originated, but it was discovered in what might be termed a lumber room on the third floor, where the present management had some plunder stored, and in every likelihood was the result of spontaneous combustion. Quickly did the fire spread in all the room on the third floor, many of the guest loosing their apparel and effects, yet glad to get down the fire escapes. For a time it seemed that the fire boys were victors and the fire would be extinguished on the third floor, but fate willed it otherwise. The water supply was limited and to this fact alone is due the destruction of the entire building. The boys fought nobly and persistently and at the time the supply was cut off there must have been over an inch and one-half of water on the third floor. This was between 6 and 7 o'clock. Gradually the fire burned through the second story below, and here the work of destruction raged again. The fire engine in the meantime had been pumping water from the cistern on West Main street into the one at the crossing of Springer and Main. This gave the boys fresh ammunition, and right well did they use it, but this too gave out, and during the morning hours the inferior of the building kept falling in leaving only the blackened stone walls three stories high standing. The upper portion of the brick front fell with a crash about 9 o'clock. The fire will smolder now at least for a couple of days. Considerable of the hotel furniture was saved from the building, there being ample time and plenty of willing hands to assist. The loss on the third floor, however, is total and there, Mrs. HALL and daughters had most of their effects. The building, which was an imposing structure and the pride of the city, was erected in 1894 at a cost of $17,000 and was completed in July, exactly five years ago. The present owners of the building are C.D. CARTER and his mother, Mrs. B.W. CARTER, and the members of SOLOMON E. JACKSON's estate. The hotel was under the management of Mrs. LOU HALL and daughters, whose loss will be quite heavy. BERT CONCANNON narrowly escaped the fire by way of the escape at the rear of the building. His personal effects were a total loss. E.W. MARTIN, representing the American Tobacco company, occupied a room on the third floor adjoining the one in which the fire originated. He escaped hurriedly leaving clothing, and jewelry to the mercy of the flames.

The Wisnor Hotel was built on Springer Street, later renamed Washington Street. The Wisnor's guest were met at the depot by a large red and yellow trimmed stagecoach and transported back to their lodging, the first hotel in town to advertise a room with bath, said bath and plumbing fixtures located in full view in the corner of the room.

http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos17a/WisnorHotelArdmoreOK.jpg

January 1932
Establishment of a sewing room at Convention Hall to provide work for women whose husbands are too ill to do work, widows with dependents, and unmarried women who have dependents was announced by the County's relief superintendent. The women will make garments to be given to the needy. Women employed at this work will be paid at the rate $0.25 per hour for 6 hours work each day. Work will start on Monday at 8:30 a.m. Materials will be supplied by the Red Cross chapter. Funds will come from the state money for relief work.

January 1962
Ira Bridges has been awarded a diamond-studded gold emblem in recognition of his 20 years with Mobil Oil Company. He is superintendent of the Lone Grove Products Terminal and joined Mobil in 1942.

You can find current gas prices for a particular Oklahoma town by entering the name or zip code in the GasBuddy search box.
http://www.oklahomagasprices.com/

Q. Where in Oklahoma was a woman hit by falling space junk?
A.  Lottie Williams, back in January of 1997, she and two friends were walking through a park in Tulsa, Oklahoma around 3:30 a.m. when they saw a huge fireball streaking from the skies.
http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2011/09/21/woman-gets-hit-by-space-junk-lives-to-tell-tale.html

Q. How many Indian reservations are located in Oklahoma?
A. Answer in next week's newsletter

Below is from This and That newsletter archives of February 13, 2005

"Butch here are two photos of the original Gene Autry School and a class at the old young school. And do you remember the man by the gas truck, it's Jake Hollenbeck who ran the Skelly station where Wal-Mart is now." -Doug Williams
http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos5a/BerwynSchool5a.jpg

http://www.oklahomahistory.net/ttphotos5a/Hollenbeck.jpg
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"In Boise City, Oklahoma they still have the brick streets around the courthouse."

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"Alexander L. (H.) Shadden was killed in April 1898. He was buried at Newport Cemetery, I bleieve on 30 April 1898. He has just an old fieldstone for his grave. The man responsible for shooting (I understand this took place in Carter Co.) him was John Perry Bowling. John Perry was married to Bonnie Pearl Shadden, Alexander's daughter. Bonnie Pearl gave birth to a child in 1897 and both died not long after. John Perry Bowling was on trial of May 1898. I am trying to find any information concerning the trial of this shooting. Also it is believed that John Perry Bowling had another trial but not sure if it was connected. John Perry Bowling died in 1939 and buried close to Woodward. His dad is buried at Newport also. Any advice as to where to find such records would be appreciated."
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"My source says the St. Paul's Episcopal Church, across the street from the Turner Apts. in Gainesville, have real bells. The bells are set on a timer."
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"Butch, I don't know if you have any readers relocated from Sperry, Oklahoma but their only grocery store burnt down last night - it had been in operation since 1908. As of right now they don't have a cause for the fire."
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"J. W. Bailey was a farmhand in 1886 when he left Nocona, Texas with Dr. Walter Hardy to bring a herd of 25 mules (possessions of the Hardy family) to Ardmore, Oklahoma. The mules were taught to follow a grey mare wearing a bell. The party crossed the Red River to old Spanish Fort at Mud Creek, Courtney Flats. The creek was on a rampage so they had to use Brown's Ferry. The mules all went to one side of the boat in fear. Their weight caused the boat to capsize and they and everyone on board went into Old Mud. Bailey, "an old hand, cried out to Hardy to get his horse by the tail. He swam to safety with his horse leading the way and all the animals and men were saved". (Daily Ardmoreite Newspaper 1886) The second item I mentioned to you concerned J.W's wagon yard. This yard was located east of Ardmore along Main Street. It caught fire in stored hay and burned everything." -Horace "Butch" Bailey
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July 13, 1899
During the month of February, a trunk belonging to A.D. BURCH, a merchant at Pauls Valley, was stolen from the depot at that place. The theft was a deft piece of work and it was some time before any arrests were made. At the first of this month a trunk at the same depot was stolen from Miss CLARA WILLIAMS who was arranging to board the train for Holdenville where she was employed as a teacher. L.C. PAYTON, a relative of the young lady, and J.E. MARTIN deputy marshal of Pauls Valley assisted by Deputy United States Marshal BUCK GARRETT began work in earnest to discover the guilty parties. With the incarceration of SAM FELLORS committed by Judge WINN at Center yesterday, 10 persons, all of whom are black, are now in federal jail here charged with thefts. These officers certainly deserve credit for their untiring efforts in apprehending and placing behind the bars this horde of petty thieves.

HOTEL WISNOR DESTROYED
About 3:30 o'clock this morning our people were aroused by the shooting of fire arms, Ardmore's fire alarm. Those at a distance were some time in locating the fire and hopes were brightening that wherever it was it had been subdued. Presently an ominous flash appeared, then all was dark again. So sudden was this that eye witnesses at a distance could not locate it. They had not long to wait, however, when a blaze shot heavenward through the roof of the Wisnor hotel. In the meantime Ardmore's fire fighters were on the scene and the battle began. No one knows how the fire originated, but it was discovered in what might be termed a lumber room on the third floor, where the present management had some plunder stored, and in every likelihood was the result of spontaneous combustion. Quickly did the fire spread in all the room on the third floor, many of the guest loosing their apparel and effects, yet glad to get down the fire escapes. For a time it seemed that the fire boys were victors and the fire would be extinguished on the third floor, but fate willed it otherwise. The water supply was limited and to this fact alone is due the destruction of the entire building. The boys fought nobly and persistently and at the time the supply was cut off there must have been over an inch and one-half of water on the third floor. This was between 6 and 7 o'clock. Gradually the fire burned through the second story below, and here the work of destruction raged again. The fire engine in the meantime had been pumping water from the cistern on West Main street into the one at the crossing of Springer and Main. This gave the boys fresh ammunition, and right well did they use it, but this too gave out, and during the morning hours the inferior of the building kept falling in leaving only the blackened stone walls three stories high standing. The upper portion of the brick front fell with a crash about 9 o'clock. The fire will smolder now at least for a couple of days. Considerable of the hotel furniture was saved from the building, there being ample time and plenty of willing hands to assist. The loss on the third floor, however, is total and there, Mrs. HALL and daughters had most of their effects. The building, which was an imposing structure and the pride of the city, was erected in 1894 at a cost of $17,000, and was completed in July, exactly five years ago. The present owners of the building are C.D. CARTER and his mother, Mrs. B.W. CARTER, and the members of SOLOMON E. JACKSON's estate. The hotel was under the management of Mrs. LOU HALL and daughters, whose loss will be quite heavy. BERT CONCANNON narrowly escaped the fire by way of the escape at the rear of the building. His personal effects were a total loss. E.W. MARTIN, representing the American Tobacco company, occupied a room on the third floor adjoining the one in which the fire originated. He escaped hurriedly leaving clothing, and jewelry to the mercy of the flames.

CAMP ORGANIZED
The young men of the city met as per call, last night at the city hall and organized a camp of Sons of the Confederate Veterans. W.M. FRANKLIN called the meeting to order and stated the object of the call. HARVE A. YOUNGBLOOD and Rev. N.F. LAW made many useful suggestions to the body. Permanent organization was effected by the election of W.M. FRANKLIN, commander; R.H. LAW, 1st Lieut.; H.H. YOUNGLOOD, 2nd Lieut.; N.R. TISDAL, adjutant; Dr. A.A. SMITH, surgeon; E.L. DEEN, color bearer; W.S. SMITH, chaplain. As a name for the camp "SAM DAVIS" was put in motion by J.C. GRAHAM with a short speech in eulogy of the young southerner. The name was unanimously accepted.

Others mentioned in this article: J.F. EASLEY, SUMMERS HARDY, S.M. TORBETT, JESS HILL, T.B. FRENSLEY, STANLEY BRUCE, L.C. LANDRUM, W.S. SMITH, C.R. FRENSLEY, R.H. LAW, H.H. YOUNGBLOOD, A.J. CARSON, JACK SANDLIN, N.R. TISDAL, T.W. DEEN, and Atty. J.C. GRAHAM.
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November 1, 1933
AGED ARDMORE MAN IS CHARGED WITH SHOOTING
JACK ADAMS, 15, of 702 East Broadway, is in the Hardy sanitarium with half a score of birdshot in his head and nearly as many in his left forearm, C.H. BEAN, 13, of 207 C street northwest, and D. TILLMAN, 15, of 1215 Fifth northeast, are at their homes suffering from less serious injuries as the result of a tragic conclusion to a Halloween prank in northeast Ardmore last night. JOHN EGGELSTON, 70, pioneer blacksmith of Ardmore, was arrested by city police for the shooting. Witnesses said that the aged man, aggravated by the pranks of youngsters in his neighborhood, fired on Adams, Bean and Tillman with a shotgun. He told officers that he only meant to frighten the youngsters. The shooting took place at Eggleston's home in the 1300 block on Third northeast. All three of the boys have been given anti-tetanus serum. Adams was in considerable pain today but was not believed in a critical condition. None of the shots struck the boys in their eyes it was said. Adams said that he and his companions were on the ground when the man fired on them. Six other boys were with the three wounded. They are HAROLD ADAMS, ELLIOTT DOOL, JACK WORLEY, WENDELL SHAW, CLYDE BEAD, AND RALPH ADAMS. Eggelston was at liberty on bond today. MARVIN SHILLING, county attorney, said that he plans to file charges of assault with intent to kill against the aged man. Neighbors in the vicinity of the Eggelston home were considerably incensed at the act and expressed much resentment at the man's action. No other major difficulty on Halloween was reported to police. A few shop windows and windshields were soaped; lawn furniture was piled up in the streets and other minor offenses recorded. However officers described the night as a "peaceful one".
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Some mail from this week's MAILBAG.....

This is a rare photo to find of a deceased baby brought to a photographer in Ardmore to be photographed before burial.
http://www.oklahomahistory.net/postcards/UnknownPostMortemBaby.jpg
"Butch: There has been recent discussion in T&T about broomcorn. My maternal grandparents Dill and Arlie Roller lived in western Garvin County a few miles southwest of Antioch on Panther Creek near the foot of Table Top Mountain. In the 1930's and early 1940's broomcorn was king in that area as a cash crop. I spent many a summer with my grandparents and worked broomcorn. It was a tough job and the harvest season was during August, the hottest time in Oklahoma. Broomcorn grows as a tall stalk about the size of a broom handle to a height of about eight feet with a head of numerous straws about 18 inches long with a thousand or more small fuzzy seeds about the size of No. 6 shot in a shotgun shell. It required intensive hand labor in a 10-12 day time frame to harvest. If not harvested at the right time the entire crop could be lost. First, the stalks had to be "tabled". That means workers walked between two rows and broke the stalks over behind them at an angle forming a table-like structure about waist high with the heads laying on top. Then, the "johnnies" came alongside the "tables" using a special knife called "johnny knife" and cut the heads from the stalks and placed them in small stacks on the "tables." Then, mule drawn wagons with special beds came along and workers picked up the stacks and gave them to the two workers on the wagons. They stacked the broomcorn heads in a certain way so air circulated through them else moisture could collect and spoil the broomcorn straws and seeds. When the wagons were loaded they went to a curing shed constructed with open slats so air circulated through it. Workers (usually kids known as "piss ants") carried arm loads off loaded from the wagons to "stackers" working in the shed. Again, the rows of broomcorn heads had to be stacked in a certain way so plenty of air circulated to aid the curing process. Then, after a two to three week drying process the "piss ants" again carried arm loads of broomcorn heads to workers running the power "seeder." The heads were fed a certain way through the seeder which striped the tiny seeds from the straws. Seeds flew everywhere. They are fuzzy and irritable to the skin causing itching and burning. Everyone wore long sleeve shirts tightly buttoned at the neck and wrists and bandanas over mouth and nose and tight fitting headgear. It was hot and miserable. The "seeded" heads were then placed systematically in a baler much like the roll hay balers used today only stationary. The baler compressed the stalks into a large round bale secured by 10 or 12 strands of a special baling wire making a bale of about 1,000 pounds. The bales were hauled to Lindsay and sold for cash. Lindsay then claimed to be the Broomcorn Capitol of the World. I not only was a "piss ant" but later as a teenager "tabled" and "johnnied" broomcorn. I remember some of the guys I worked with. They were Red Ketchum, Bill Blackwood, "Heavy" Brookshire, and "Bit" Fowler. He was called "Bit" because in a fight the other guy took a bite out of his left ear. I don't think broomcorn is grown in the United States anymore. All the straw brooms sold here now come from Mexico." -Don Davidson, Brenham Texas

Hope for the best and prepare for the worst.
-Thomas Norton & Thomas Sackville (1536-1608)

See everyone next week!

Butch and Jill Bridges
Nashobish Ikana
PO Box 11
Ardmore, Oklahoma 73402

http://www.OklahomaHistory.net

Vicious Dog Attacks in Oklahoma
http://www.oklahomahistory.net/viciousdogs.html
Oklahoma Bells: http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/bellpage.html
Bill Hamm's Cemetery Database
http://www.usgwarchives.net/ok/carter/cartercm.htm
American Flyers Memorial Fund - Administration Webpage
http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/crash66.html
Official American Flyers Memorial Website
http://www.brightok.net/~wwwafm
Ardmore Army Air Field/Ardmore Air Force Base Website
http://www.brightok.net/~gsimmons
Mirror Site of the Ardmore Army Air Field/Ardmore Air Force Website
http://www.OklahomaHistory.net/airbase/
Carter County Government Website
http://cartercountyok.us

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